New Release: Wayne Feinstein, Former Executive Director, Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties, 1991-2000

The Oral History Center of The Bancroft Library is pleased to announce the release of a new life history interview with Wayne Feinstein, who served as Executive Director of the Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties from 1991 to 2000.

Wayne Feinstein was born Albany, New York, in 1952 and raised largely in Columbus, Ohio. He was active in his local Jewish congregation as a teenager and seriously considered the idea of attending seminary. He took an undergraduate degree from Colgate College and after graduation went to work for a series of Jewish community nonprofits, including: the United Jewish Appeal, the Jewish Welfare Federation in San Francisco, and the Council of Jewish Federations in New York. His first leadership role was as executive director of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit, which was followed by years heading up the Los Angeles Jewish Federation and the San Francisco Jewish Community Federation, where he was executive director from 1991 to 2000. In 2000, he switched careers, going into the private sector, eventually becoming a vice president at the Capital Group. In this interview, Feinstein discusses his childhood, education, and experiences formative in the development of his decision to serve the Jewish community for roughly three decades. He surveys the landscape of Jewish communal organizations and describes how the roles played by those organizations changed over the last quarter of the 20th century. Feinstein details, in particular, the three federations for which he served as staff executive, focusing on the fundraising and service functions of those organizations.

Wayne Feinstein, former Executive Director of the Jewish Community Federation

Mr. Feinstein’s interview adds yet another voice to our long-running interest in documenting Jewish philanthropy and community life in the San Francisco Bay Area, particularly through our “Jewish Community Leaders” oral history project. Other significant interviews from that project include: Annette DobbsPeter Haas, Samuel Ladar; William Lowenberg; Brian Lurie; Roselyn Swig; and many more.

“I Can’t Afford Your Class”

I can't afford your class.

Two Sessions:
Friday, May 5, 3:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Monday, May 8, 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Academic Innovation Studio
117 Dwinelle Hall

The high and ever-increasing costs of textbooks and other assigned course readings are a major concern for UC Berkeley students. College textbook prices have risen 88% in the past decade, with individual textbooks often costing at least $200 each. Print course pack costs further compound students’ financial burdens. These rising expenses come at a time when 42% of the UC student body systemwide experiences food insecurity due to inadequate living funds.

The UC Berkeley campus has begun to tackle these issues, and there are nuanced questions to address with numerous stakeholders. The Center for Teaching & Learning, University Library, and Academic Innovation Studio are excited to invite you to join this conversation and learn about:

  • The landscape for course content affordability issues, and the situation at UC Berkeley;
  • What campus-wide and Library-led efforts are being undertaken; and
  • The tools, resources, and services instructors and students can rely on to help limit costs.

We hope you’ll join us as we launch a broad discussion about this important topic! There will be plenty of time reserved for questions and debate. We are hosting the same event on two dates to try to accommodate as many attendees’ schedules as possible.

If you have any questions, please contact Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communication Officer at the Library, at rsamberg@berkeley.edu.

Summer Reading List: March

March

March
by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell
Marietta: Top Shelf Productions, 2016

Before he became a respected Congressman, John Lewis was clubbed, gassed, arrested over 40 times, and nearly killed by angry mobs and state police, all while nonviolently protesting racial discrimination. He marched side-by-side with Martin Luther King as the youngest leader of the Civil Rights Movement that would change a nation forever.

March, a compelling trilogy of graphic memoirs about Lewis’s experiences participating in nonviolent civil rights protests (the third book of the trilogy recently won a National Book Award), speaks directly to the theme “What Can We Change in a Single Generation?” and to the current era of social justice activism many Berkeley students are engaged in.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Celebrating Cal Day in the Library!

As you tour the Berkeley campus in celebration of Cal Day, make sure to stop by our libraries. Across a dozen locations, we have hands-on activities for all ages, exhibits that highlight unique library materials and talks with our expert curators. We’ll update this page with photos throughout the day. Check out our Cal Day schedule. And, Go Bears!

Visitors and dinosaur replica

Visitors young and old check out some prehistoric finds outside the Bioscience & Natural Resources Library. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Books and other materials

Items are on display at the Bioscience & Natural Resources Library. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Doe Library

Students and visitors flock to the Doe Library on Cal Day. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Kids color

Little Cal fans color images from our collections in the Morrison Library. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Kids color

Little Cal fans color images from our collections in the Morrison Library. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Coloring pages hang in library

Coloring pages are on display in the Morrison Library. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Curator discusses materials with patrons

Curators at The Bancroft Library are available to discuss our current exhibit, “New Favorites: Collecting in the Bancroft Tradition.” (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Curator discusses materials with patrons

Curators at The Bancroft Library are available to discuss our current exhibit, “New Favorites: Collecting in the Bancroft Tradition.” (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Patrons buy books at book sale

Literary enthusiasts swarm the book sale in Doe Library room 303. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

JAMAevidence: New evidence resource from the library

The UCB Library recently purchased access to JAMAevidence.

JAMAevidence is a resource of evidence-based tools and more, including Users’ Guides to the Medical Literature. This online guide includes Education Guide slide sets, audio summaries, calculators, and critical appraisal and information cycle worksheets – these are not included in the print version.

The Users’ Guides 29 chapters are under these headings:

  • The Foundations
  • Therapy
  • Harm (Observational Studies)
  • Diagnosis
  • Prognosis
  • Summarizing the Evidence
  • Moving From Evidence to Action

Enjoy!

C. V. Starr East Asian Library acquires the largest Chinese film studies collection in North America

Materials from the Paul Kendel Fonoroff Collection for Chinese Film Studies. (Photograph by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Materials from the Paul Kendel Fonoroff Collection for Chinese Film Studies. (Photograph by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

The C. V. Starr East Asian Library at UC Berkeley today announces its acquisition of the largest and most comprehensive Chinese film studies collection in North America. The over-70,000 periodicals, posters, photographs, and ephemera contained in the Paul Kendel Fonoroff collection document the development of the film and entertainment industry of greater China from its inception in the early decades of the twentieth century to the 1990s.

“This amazing collection makes Berkeley the premier research information center of Chinese film studies in the country,” says Peter Zhou, director of the C. V. Starr East Asian Library.

The library acquired the collection in 2015, and has spent the past year receiving the materials and developing a comprehensive website that scholars at UC Berkeley — and across the world — can access to gain a fresh perspective on the history of Chinese popular culture, media, and social life. The public can also learn more about Fonoroff’s experience as a collector.

“The Fonoroff Collection is a unique trove of historical materials on Chinese cinema and media, one which will allow scholars and students to make fresh discoveries, and tell new and more comprehensive stories about modern Chinese culture and history in this tumultuous century,” explains Andrew F. Jones, Louis B. Agassiz Professor of Chinese at UC Berkeley.  

The collection includes:

  •       436 pre-1950 periodicals in 5,901 issues
  •       239 post-1950 periodicals in 4,638 issues
  •       4,195 posters
  •       21,233 lobby cards, in 2,194 sets
  •       3,332 theater flyers
  •       4,370 scripts, booklets, and novelettes
  •       5,976 pieces of ephemera
  •       9,214 photographic negatives and slides
  •       4,145 stills and publicity photos
  •       837 VHS tapes
  •       2,450 articles and columns authored by Paul Fonoroff
  •       5,637 Mao badges
Paul Fonoroff pictured in the C. V. Starr East Asian Library. (Photograph by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Paul Fonoroff pictured in the C. V. Starr East Asian Library. (Photograph by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Born in Cleveland, Paul Fonoroff completed an undergraduate degree in Chinese at Brown University and an MFA in cinema at the University of Southern California before moving to Hong Kong in 1983. Once there, he established himself as a movie critic and a media personality, appearing in countless television programs and Chinese movies. He also amassed a large collection of movie literature and memorabilia, including posters, lobby cards, movie magazines, stills, souvenir booklets, novelettes, scripts, and ephemera produced for films made in Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Southeast Asia. Some of the photographs in his former collection are autographed, some of the scripts are annotated, and some of the periodical runs are astonishingly full, surpassing those in any library in North America. Many of the publications, which range from the 1920s to the 1980s, are scarce; some are unique.

“This vast and unique collection is truly a heritage of world cinema,” explains Weihong Bao, Associate Professor of Chinese & Film and Media at UC Berkeley. “It tells us vividly how Chinese language cinema has always crossed assumed boundaries of nation, region, and media. Its richness invites new approaches and interdisciplinary dialogues for many years to come.”

Media inquiries can be directed to Tiffany Grandstaff, director of communications for the University Library, librarycommunications@berkeley.edu.

Items from the Fonoroff Collection on display in the C.V. Starr East Asian Library (Photograph by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)

Items from the Fonoroff Collection on display in the C.V. Starr East Asian Library (Photograph by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)

About the Library

The C. V. Starr East Asian Library is part of the University Library at UC Berkeley, an internationally renowned research and teaching facility at the nation’s premier public university. A highly diverse and intellectually rich environment, Berkeley serves a campus community of approximately 27,400 undergraduate students, 10,700 graduate students, and 1,600 faculty members. The Library is comprised of more than two dozen libraries, including the Doe/Moffitt Libraries, The Bancroft Library, The C. V. Starr East Asian Library, and many subject specialty libraries. With a collections budget of over $15 million, the Library offers extensive collections in all formats and robust services to connect users with the collections and build their research skills, while working to help UC Berkeley scholars build research impact.

Exhibit: New Favorites: Collecting in the Bancroft Tradition

New Favorites: Collecting in the Bancroft TraditionBancroft Library Gallery
April 21 – September 1, 2017

For the first time in many years the Bancroft Library presents an exhibition of recent additions to its major collections. The exhibition also includes recently rediscovered masterpieces carefully collected in years past. Gold Rush-era memoirs and advertisements, early editions of William Langland and Jane Austen, “branded” books from 18th c. Mexico, and David Johnson’s photographs of the African American community in San Francisco after World War II are but a few of the items featured.

The exhibition showcases the Bancroft curators and their distinctive collecting practices, which expand the remarkable vision of library founder Hubert Howe Bancroft–documenting California as it was happening and building a library for the American West that would rival its European antecedents.

Presented by the Friends of the Bancroft Library.

The Bancroft Library Gallery is open Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm, excluding holidays.

For more information, please call 510-642-3782 or visit bancroft@berkeley.edu.

Virtual Reality for Cal Day

The Kresge Engineering Library will be one of the host sites for VR @ Berkeley, a student group that brings virtual reality to the campus community. By working with industry and UC-Berkeley researchers, VR @ Berkeley makes virtual reality an accessible experience. Each year, members of the group focus on a wide range of projects that bend the intersection between our physical realities and the virtual. Their work spans many applications including: changing the way we read and interact with textbooks, allowing medical workers in the field communicate with doctors in a more intuitive manner, and a virtual experience of our iconic, 61 bell Campanile.

Virtual Reality at Berkeley Landships

 

During Cal Day, the Kresge Engineering Library will be hosting Project Landships, a multiplayer tank combat simulator. Players can work together as a crew to aim, shoot, drive, and spot. The experience emulates a WWII Sherman Firefly Tank.

Check out other VR @ Berkeley Projects on Cal Day at the following locations:
1. Kresge Engineering Library
2. ESS Patio
3. Jacobs Hall
4. Sproul Plaza
5. The House (Bancroft)
6. Moffitt Library

 

 

 

 

Edible Book Festival 2017: The Results

People viewing the Edible Book Festival Entries

Does reading make you hungry? Have you ever wanted to eat a book? The Edible Book Festival is an opportunity to do just that (or to imagine doing it, anyway). This year’s festival, held on Monday, April 10 in Moffitt Library, was a display of culinary renderings of famous literary works. Entries ran the gamut, from “A Wrinkle in Thyme” (A Wrinkle in Time) to “Red Velveteen Rabbit Cupcakes” (The Velveteen Rabbit) to “Me Guac Pretty One Day” (Me Talk Pretty One Day). Some entries played directly off their book’s title, as in the case of an olive twist bread, while others made references to the content: a daikon radish boat sailing over a pile of collard greens (Love in the Time of Cholera).

Susan Powell with her entry, 'Charred Lettuce Web'

Susan Powell with her entry, ‘Charred Lettuce Web’

Judges Julie Chen, Jeff MacKie-Mason, and Susan Schweik selected entries for the categories of Best in Show, Least Edible, Most Edible, Punniest, and Best Undergraduate Student Entry. There was also a People’s Choice award, for which the 80-plus attendees cast votes for their top three picks. Competition for this award was fierce: the winter was “Love in the Thyme of Collard Greens,” with “Olive(r) Twist” and “The Last UniCorn Dog” taking second and third place, respectively. “Love” also took Best in Show, while the corn dogs went home with Punniest.

Other winners were “The End of Your Leaf Book Club” (The End of your Life Book Club) for Most Book-Like, and “Rye + Pressed Juice = This” (Pride and Prejudice) for Best Student Entry. “12th Night” (Twelfth Night), “Olive(r) Twist” (Oliver Twist), and “The Last UniCorn Dog” (The Last Unicorn) all took Edible Mentions.

The Edible Books Festival is held on or around April 1, which is the birthday of French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, author of Physiologie du gout. The other, highly flexible rules of the festival require that all entries “. . . must be ‘bookish’ through the integration of text, literary inspiration, or, quite simply, the form.” It is an international phenomenon, with participation in Germany, Australia, Japan, and China, among other countries. This year’s festival was UC Berkeley’s first, but the judges, participants, and attendees are already looking forward to next year.

'Love in the Thyme of Collard Greens,' an entry in the Edible Book Festival

'12th Night,' an entry in the Edible Book Festival

 

Cal Day in the Library!

Images of UC Berkeley Libraries

Saturday, April 22

ARTIST AND POP-UP BOOKS
210 Wurster Hall, Environmental Design Library
9 AM – 12 PM

DISCOVER MOFFITT LIBRARY
Mofftt Library, 4th Floor
10 AM – 12 PM

COLOR THE UC BERKELEY LIBRARY COLLECTIONS
Morrison Library, Doe Library, 1st Floor
10 AM – 3 PM

BANCROFT GALLERY TALKS
The Bancroft Library Gallery, 2nd Floor
10 AM – 3 PM (at the top of the hour)

TAKE THE WORLD FOR A SPIN
50 McCone Hall, Earth Science & Map Library
10 AM – 3 PM

CALLING ALL ECLIPSE CHASERS
351 LeConte Hall, Physics-Astronomy Library
10 AM – 3 PM

WOMEN WHO FIGURE: THE MATHEMATICIANS OF HIDDEN FIGURES
100 Evans Hall, Mathematics Statistics Library
10 AM – 3 PM

CHECK OUT BEARS, BUGS, DINOSAURS, AND MORE
2101 Valley Life Sciences Building, Bioscience & Natural Resources Library
10 AM – 3 PM

CELEBRATE SOCIAL JUSTICE
30 Stephens Hall, Ethnic Studies Library
10 AM – 4 PM

VISIT THE INTERLIBRARY SERVICES DEPARTMENT
133 Doe Library, 1st Floor
11 AM – 4 PM

EAST ASIAN LIBRARY TOUR
C. V. Starr East Asian Library
2 PM – 3 PM

Click here to view a full list of library events!

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