UC Berkeley students get free Lynda.com subscriptions, thanks to Library grant

Staff at computer
Chris O’Dea, a manager for the School of Journalism’s Production Lab, talks about the benefits of students having access to online tutorials through Lynda.com on Feb. 6, 2018. (Photos by Jami Smith for the University Library)

Not long ago, the coolest perks for UC Berkeley students were probably free bus rides and gym memberships.

But now, students also have free access to a world of classes outside of the UC Berkeley campus through the online learning platform Lynda.com. As of last month, all students have premium memberships to the website, which hosts nearly 6,500 courses on topics ranging from web design and programming to media production and creative skills.

The campus-wide Lynda.com availability began as a joint effort by campus and Library staff members who, a few years ago, recognized the lack of resources available to students responsible for navigating and ultimately leading in an increasingly digital world.

One early champion of Lynda.com was Chris O’Dea, the production manager at the campus’s Graduate School of Journalism who heads technical instruction.

The J-School, O’Dea said, has cages full of technical equipment that students must quickly master, on top of the suite of editing software needed for multimedia journalism. Lynda.com offers full tutorials for the Adobe suite, used extensively at the J-School. The site also has introductory classes on computer coding, which are invaluable for journalism students learning data visualization, O’Dea said.

“We are the smallest professional school on campus, but we have some of the biggest technical needs,” said O’Dea, who has used Lynda.com for the past 10 years. The learning curve can be overwhelming for students, O’Dea said, and tools such as Lynda.com can be important buffers for the rocky road. Previously, the J-School had purchased individual subscriptions.

On the site, which is owned by LinkedIn, courses are taught by experts in the field — including Berkeley faculty members — and come with downloadable exercise files for users to work alongside the instructor. There is also a transcript of each lesson below the video, and corresponding text is highlighted as the instructor speaks.

Portrait of Chris O'Dea
O’Dea was part of the team who helped get Berkeley students free access to Lynda.com.

That interface is key for the Berkeley campus, which has a large international student body, O’Dea said.

“(Having the words) is pivotal when you’re trying to learn something,” he said.

In the search menu, courses can be filtered by skill level, duration, instructor, and subject. And because the lessons are fully transcribed, users can scan entire courses for particular words and skip to the sections they need.

“There’s really nothing to compare it to,” O’Dea said. “If I’m on YouTube, I could waste an hour on one topic, easily. There’s a million YouTube videos out there, and some of them are decent, and some of them are garbage.”

Three years ago, O’Dea approached campus administrators about getting Lynda.com for students. O’Dea was so passionate, in fact, that the campus thought he was trying to sell them something.

“They thought I was from Lynda.com,” O’Dea said, smiling. “They scheduled an appointment, … and I sat down and was like, ‘No, I work for you guys.’”

The campus gave O’Dea a job: to rally support from other departments and gauge how the platform could benefit other schools and centers on campus.

O’Dea started with the Library — which, incidentally, had similar efforts underway.

Cody Hennesy
E-Learning and Information Studies Librarian Cody Hennesy wrote a proposal for Lynda.com student subscriptions. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

According to Cody Hennesy, the campus’s e-learning and information studies librarian, the Library had conducted a survey of students to learn what their technological needs were and which of them were not being met by the campus.

Using that information, along with discussions with O’Dea and others, Hennesy wrote a proposal for Lynda.com student subscriptions and offered it to the Student Technology Fund, which makes recommendations to the chancellor’s office on how to allocate funds for technology projects.

“We wanted to help students create media on their own — to be more empowered to create multimedia presentations, videos, and podcasts,” Hennesy said. “But that’s not something we have the capacity to teach. So this fills that need.”

Students can find recommended Lynda.com courses for UC Berkeley students on the website for the Library’s Level Up initiative, which aims to strengthen student’s digital literacy and technical skills. 

The voting members on the Student Technology Fund Committee (STFC) are mostly students. The STFC recommended $63,750 for a two-year pilot program, said Aneesh Chimbili, a program associate at the Student Technology Fund who helped provide a student perspective to the committee.

The STFC may decide to continue funding the subscriptions after two years if the Library can show data that enough students have used and benefited from the platform, said Aayush Patel, also a program associate at the Student Technology Fund.

For Chimbili and Patel, who are both students, the great benefit of Lynda.com is that it widens the range of disciplines that students have access to in a traditional course load. Aside from software and technical skills, the site also has classes on business strategy, marketing, and leadership.

“I’m a computer science major,” said Chimbili. “But if I want to learn more about entrepreneurship or business, and I don’t have the ability to get into those Haas classes, now I can, as a student of UC Berkeley, freely access a platform that has courses specifically for that content.”

Of course, Lynda.com does not supercede professorship, O’Dea said; nothing can replace the sense of inspiration and guidance born in a real classroom. But it can certainly complement the academic experience, and the challenge now will be for campus instructors to figure out how to integrate the learning platform into their classes.

For now, the J-School wants to use Lynda.com as kind of homework, where professors might assign a 15-minute video on editing software to a student and have them come in the next day to work on a shared piece.

“If you give everybody access to Lynda.com and you don’t give them any kind of chaperoning, it’s just going to go to waste,” O’Dea said. “It’s really important for the professor and the faculty to incorporate it into their class and have a reason and way to use it.”

“This — properly harnessed — can only add benefit in a classroom,” he said.

Read the 2018 PEN America Literary Awards Winners

Pen Award Winnersby Taylor Follett

The 2018 PEN American Literary Award Winners were announced on February 20th in PEN America’s 55th annual award ceremony. The PEN Awards pride themselves in their long history of bestowing awards to influential and diverse voices in literature, the grants they are able to award to well-deserving authors, and most importantly, the incredible books they choose to honor.

As a rule, the books selected by the PEN judges make wonderful reads. This year’s winners are no exception:

(more…)

Library celebrates donors with exclusive exhibit at Music Library

John Shepard and a crowd of people
John Shepard, Curator of Music Collections, third from left, talks about a rare collection of books during a luncheon for the Library Legacy Circle at the Music Library on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photos by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

At a special viewing of rare musical materials, the message to the audience was clear: We could not have done this without you.

Gathered around an impressive display in the Jean Gray Hargrove Music Library was the Library Legacy Circle of The Benjamin Ide Wheeler Society, a group of donors who have remembered the Library in their bequest plans.

This was the first such event for the Legacy Circle, and the Library plans to continue the tradition annually — unearthing gems from each of the campus’s 25 libraries.

After a tour of the Music Library, John Shepard, curator of music collections, showed the group treasures he had selected from the collection and described their unique story. Among the gems were an original manuscript of Ludwig van Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 6, scribbled in his own hand; a theory book on Gregorian chant music from 1375; Jacopo Peri’s La Dafne d’Ottavio Rinuccini, recognized as the world’s first opera; and first editions of George Frideric Handel’s coronation odes, which have been performed at every English coronation ceremony since that of King George III. The Library has several first editions of Handel pieces, which regularly attract musicologists and Handel experts to the campus, Shepard said.

The Music Library has eight substantial endowments, which allow Shepard to chase and collect unique materials.

donors look at books
Donors view one of the Music Library’s rare collections at the luncheon.

“I can’t tell you what a joy it is to be able to build on our collection’s strengths,” Shepard said. “There are names of alumni on these endowments, and this,” he said, motioning to the items on the table, “could not have happened without their support.”

Before the viewing, University Librarian Jeffrey MacKie-Mason thanked donors for their support and described recent developments and efforts underway at the Library — including the Level Up initiative on digital literacy, and the Digital Lifecycle Program, which makes rare collections more accessible to scholars worldwide.

“We’d like to make all of those (resources) available online right now, so that all of you, and every K-12 student in California, and on the planet, can access our special, rare historical collections anytime, anywhere,” MacKie-Mason told the group. The Library has 60 million items not yet online, he said. Meanwhile, state funding per student continues to decline, and it is increasingly difficult for campus departments to stay afloat. Only 14 percent of the campus budget comes from the state; the remainder is pulled from tuition and donors.

Librarian speaks
Jeffrey MacKie-Mason, University Librarian, center, welcomes donors to the Library Legacy Circle luncheon at the Music Library on Feb. 10, 2018.

“This isn’t just for the Library — it’s for the whole university,” said Sheryl Wong, a Legacy Circle member and longtime Library Board member. “It is not going to survive without philanthropy.”

Wong’s parents met when they were students at Cal. During her father’s junior year, he received a scholarship that let him stay in college — and gave a shy kid a reason to ask Sheryl’s mother out on a date.

“My mom was very popular,” Wong said, laughing. “My dad knew her, but he was a nerd, an engineering student — he would never have asked her for a date.

“But he walked up to her and said, ‘I just got some really good news. I have a little bit of money, would you like to go to lunch with me?’ And she said yes. And that’s why I’m here.”

After her father died, Wong helped her mother endow a scholarship in her parents’ name.

Closing his remarks, MacKie-Mason gave one last thank you on behalf of the Library for the Legacy Circle’s perennial support.

“It’s because of people like you that we have a bright future,” he said.

Donors chat in Music Library
Left to right: Dr.​ ​Victor W. Willits ’62, Ed.D. ’68, Col.​ ​Don E. Kosovac ’58, ​and ​Mark W. Jordan J.D. ’66 chat at the event.

March 1: Lunch Poems featuring Rosa Alcalá

Rosa Alcalá

Thursday, March 1
12:10 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Morrison Library in Doe Library
Admission Free

Born and raised in Paterson, NJ, Rosa Alcalá is the author of three books of poetry, most recently MyOTHER TONGUE. Her poetry also appears in a number of anthologies, including Stephen Burt’s The Poem is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them. The recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship, her translations are featured in the forthcoming Cecilia Vicuña: New & Selected Poems. Alcalá teaches in the Department of Creative Writing and Bilingual MFA Program at the University of Texas-El Paso.

UC Berkeley celebrates Love Data Week with great talks and tips!

Last week, the University Library, the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), the Research Data Management program were delighted to host Love Data Week (LDW) 2018 at UC Berkeley. Love Data Week is a nationwide campaign designed to raise awareness about data visualization, management, sharing, and preservation. The theme of this year’s campaign was data stories to discuss how data is being used in meaningful ways to shape the world around us.

At UC Berkeley, we hosted a series of events designed to help researchers, data specialists, and librarians to better address and plan for research data needs. The events covered issues related to collecting, managing, publishing, and visualizing data. The audiences gained hands-on experience with using APIs, learned about resources that the campus provides for managing and publishing research data, and engaged in discussions around researchers’ data needs at different stages of their research process.

Participants from many campus groups (e.g., LBNL, CSS-IT) were eager to continue the stimulating conversation around data management. Check out the full program and information about the presented topics.

Photographs by Yasmin AlNoamany for the University Library and BIDS.

Eric Livingston explains the difference between Elsevier APIs.

LDW at UC Berkeley was kicked off by a walkthrough and demos about Scopus APIs (Application Programming Interface), was led by Eric Livingston of the publishing company, Elsevier. Elsevier provides a set of APIs that allow users to access the content of journals and books published by Elsevier.

In the first part of the session, Eric provided a quick introduction to APIs and an overview about Elsevier APIs. He illustrated the purposes of different APIs that Elsevier provides such as DirectScience APIs, SciVal API, Engineering Village API, Embase APIs, and Scopus APIs. As mentioned by Eric, anyone can get free access to Elsevier APIs, and the content published by Elsevier under Open Access licenses is fully available. Eric explained that Scopus APIs allow users to access curated abstracts and citation data from all scholarly journals indexed by Scopus, Elsevier’s abstract and citation database. He detailed multiple popular Scopus APIs such as Search API, Abstract Retrieval API, Citation Count API, Citation Overview API, and Serial Title API. Eric also overviewed the amount of data that Scopus database holds.

The attendees conduct live queries on Scopus APIs.

In the second half of the workshop, Eric explained how Scopus APIs work, how to get a key to Scopus APIs, and showed different authentication methods. He walked the group through live queries, showed them how to extract data from API and how to debug queries using the advanced search. He talked about the limitations of the APIs and provided tips and tricks for working with Scopus APIs.

 

Eric explains code snippets for querying Scopus APIs.

Eric left the attendances with actionable and workable code and scripts to pull and retrieve data from Scopus APIs.

The Data Stories and Visualization Panel.

On the second day, we hosted a Data Stories and Visualization Panel, featuring Claudia von Vacano (D-Lab), Garret S. Christensen (BIDS and BITSS), Orianna DeMasi (Computer Science and BIDS), and Rita Lucarelli (Department of Near Eastern Studies). The talks and discussions centered upon how data is being used in creative and compelling ways to tell stories, in addition to rewards and challenges of supporting groundbreaking research when the underlying research data is restricted.

Claudia von Vacano talks about the Online Hate Index project.

Claudia von Vacano, the Director of D-Lab, discussed the Online Hate Index (OHI), a joint initiative of the Anti-Defamation League’s (ADL) Center for Technology and Society that uses crowd-sourcing and machine learning to develop scalable detection of the growing amount of hate speech within social media. In its recently-completed initial phase, the project focused on training a model based on an unbiased dataset collected from Reddit. Claudia explained the process, from identifying the problem, defining hate speech, and establishing rules for human coding, through building, training, and deploying the machine learning model. Going forward, the project team plans to improve the accuracy of the model and extend it to include other social media platforms.

Garret S. Christensen talks about his experience with research data.

Next, Garret S. Christensen, BIDS and BITSS fellow, talked about his experience with research data. He started by providing a background about his research, then discussed the challenges he faced in collecting his research data. The main research questions that Garret investigated are: How are people responding to military deaths? Do large numbers of, or high-profile, deaths affect people’s decision to enlist in the military?

Garret shows the relation between US deaths rate and the number of applicants to the military.

Garret discussed the challenges of obtaining and working with the Department of Defense data obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request for the purpose of researching war deaths and military recruitment. Despite all the challenges that Garret faced and the time he spent on getting the data, he succeeded in putting the data together into a public repository. Now the information on deaths in the US Military from January 1, 1990 to November 11, 2010 that was obtained through Freedom of Information Act request is available on dataverse. At the end, Garret showed that how deaths and recruits have a negative relationship.

Orianna DeMasi related her experience of working on real problems with real human data to taming dragons.

Orianna DeMasi, a graduate student of Computer Science and BIDS Fellow, shared her story of working with human subjects data. The focus of Orianna’s research is on building tools to improve mental healthcare. Orianna framed her story about collecting and working with human subject data as a fairy tale story. She indicated that working with human data makes security and privacy essential. She has learned that it’s easy to get blocked “waiting for data” rather than advancing the project in parallel to collecting or accessing data. At the end, Orianna advised the attendees that “we need to keep our eyes on the big problems and data is only the start.”

Rita Lucarelli is discussing the Book of the Dead in 3D.

Rita Lucarelli, Department of Near Eastern Studies discussed the Book of the Dead in 3D project, which shows how photogrammetry can help visualization and study of different sets of data within their own physical context. According to Rita, the “Book of the Dead in 3D” project aims in particular to create a database of “annotated” models of the ancient Egyptian coffins of the Hearst Museum, which is radically changing the scholarly approach and study of these inscribed objects, at the same time posing a challenge in relation to data sharing and the publication of the artifacts. Rita indicated that metadata is growing and digital data and digitization are challenging.

It was fascinating to hear about Egyptology and how to visualize 3D ancient objects!

Daniella Lowenberg presents on Research Data Management Planning and Publishing.

We closed out LDW 2018 at UC Berkeley with a session about Research Data Management Planning and Publishing. In the session, Daniella Lowenberg (University of California Curation Center) started by discussing the reasons to manage, publish, and share research data on both practical and theoretical levels.

Daniella shares tips about publishing research data.

Daniella shared practical tips about why, where, and how to manage research data and prepare it for publishing. She discussed relevant data repositories that UC Berkeley and other entities offer. Daniela also illustrated how to make data reusable, and highlighted the importance of citing research data and how this maximizes the benefit of research.

Daniella’s live demo on using Dash for publishing research data.

At the end, Daniella presented a live demo on using Dash for publishing research data and encouraged UC Berkeley workshop participants to contact her with any question about data publishing. In a lively debate, researchers shared their experiences with Daniella about working with managing research data and highlighted what has worked and what has proved difficult.

We have received overwhelmingly positive feedback from the attendees. Attendees also expressed their interest in having similar workshops to understand the broader perspectives and skills needed to help researchers manage their data.

I would like to thank BIDS and the University Library for sponsoring the events.

Yasmin AlNoamany

 

Which American presidents have visited UC Berkeley? 🇺🇸

After Theodore Roosevelt's visit to UC Berkeley, he toured Yosemite. Here he is seen at Glacier Point with naturalist John Muir. (Courtesy of The Bancroft Library [full credit below])
After Theodore Roosevelt’s visit to UC Berkeley, he toured Yosemite. Here he is seen at Glacier Point with naturalist John Muir. (Courtesy of The Bancroft Library [full credit below])
With UC Berkeley consistently ranked as the one of the top public universities in the nation, it’s no wonder it gets some world-class visitors, including — you guessed it — American presidents.

In honor of Presidents Day, here’s a list of the sitting presidents who have visited Cal. We’ve tried our best to be comprehensive, but for brevity, we’ve excluded visits by presidents before or after their time in office, as well as the president who had an official visit scheduled but canceled — we’re looking at you, William McKinley.

Much of this information appeared in a past Library exhibit called All Hail to the Chief, and the Library resources related to each president listed are by no means comprehensive.

1. Benjamin Harrison (1891)

During the spring of 1891, Benjamin Harrison came out for a visit, along with his wife and some of his cabinet members. After spending time in Southern California, his welcome in San Francisco “was a tremendous one of blazing lights, firing of cannon, tooting of whistles and pyrotechnics galore.”

On May 2, Harrison visited Berkeley, delivering a brief speech at the university, heralding the importance of institutions of higher learning. Later that day, he headed to Oakland, but the crowds were so unruly there that he couldn’t make it to the stand where he was supposed to speak. Instead, he delivered his speech while standing up in his carriage.

More: An account of Harrison’s travels, Through the South and West with the President, April 14-May 15, 1891, compiled by John S. Shriver, is available at The Bancroft Library.

2. Theodore Roosevelt (1903)

Theodore Roosevelt visited UC Berkeley in 1903, while he was president, as well as after his presidency, in 1911.

Roosevelt was friends with UC President Benjamin Ide Wheeler dating back to when Roosevelt was the governor of New York and Wheeler was teaching at Cornell University. When Roosevelt was planning a trip to California, Wheeler invited the president to speak at that year’s commencement ceremony. Roosevelt — a loyal pal — obliged.

The president was escorted to campus by mounted African American “Buffalo Soldiers” and gave the commencement address in the Greek Theatre, which, at the time, was not yet finished.

Afterward, Roosevelt, ever the outdoorsman, toured Yosemite, bonding with legendary conservationist John Muir.

More: The picture of Muir and Roosevelt that is shown above is part of Bancroft’s pictorial collection. Letters between Roosevelt and Muir are available on Calisphere.

3. William Howard Taft (1909)

William Howard Taft visited Berkeley in October of 1909, not long after taking office, an occasion marked by tragedy.

He was supposed to have been greeted by Beverly L. Hodghead, Berkeley’s first mayor, and mathematics professor Irving Stringham, who served as dean of faculties.

But that’s not what happened.

Stringham — who had fallen ill — died the morning Taft arrived. But despite that tragic turn, Taft’s visit otherwise went smoothly, with the president making a grand entrance — complete with a cavalry troop and university cadets — at the Greek Theatre, where he delivered an unplanned 10-minute address.

More: Bancroft holds an invitation from Taft’s reception during the visit. And many of the papers of then Oakland Mayor Frank M. Mott relate to Taft’s visit to Alameda County.

4. Woodrow Wilson (1919)

Woodrow Wilson — with the fitting nickname of The Professor — visited UC Berkeley as president in September of 1919, on a tour meant to garner support for America’s participation in the League of Nations, the international peacekeeping organization established after World War I.

At the time, Wilson was eyed as a potential successor to the recently retired UC President Benjamin Ide Wheeler.

Wilson, who apparently had been instructed by his physician to avoid speaking, made an unexpected speech at the Greek Theatre.

Not too long afterward, Wilson’s health began to decline. After a series of strokes, Wilson ended his tour early. Plagued by health problems, he spent the rest of his term secluded in the White House.

More: Photos from Wilson’s visit are held at Bancroft and are available on Calisphere.

5. Harry S. Truman (1948)

President Harry S. Truman delivered the commencement address here in 1948. Professor Garff Wilson, in charge of ceremonies and protocol, estimated 60,000 attended the event, but a local Republican-owned paper ran a photo of seats that were left empty on purpose, stating the stadium was “sparsely filled.”

More: BAMPFA Film Archive has an 11-minute film documenting the commencement.

6. John F. Kennedy (1962)

The last sitting president to visit Cal, John F. Kennedy spoke in 1962 on Charter Day, which marks the founding of the university. A crowd of nearly 100,000 descended upon Memorial Stadium, making it the largest audience Kennedy had addressed, and Kennedy was awarded an honorary law degree.

More: The Library holds the binder and manuscript of the speech used by Kennedy. The Library also has video recordings of the speech, which is also available to view digitally on Calisphere.

Who else?

In more recent times, Barack Obama’s oldest daughter, Malia, scouted UC Berkeley on her college tour — but her father was nowhere to be seen.

Malia eventually opted to attend Harvard, her parents’ alma mater.

But, hey — at least it wasn’t Stanford.

California Faces: The Bancroft Library Portrait Collection, Muir, John–POR:65. Courtesy of The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.

Event Showcases Art Collections from Around Campus and Beyond

Thank you to everyone who attended our successful event on Tuesday, February 13th, showcasing many of the Library’s treasures from around campus:

Open House + Arts/Visual Collections Showcase

Students, faculty, staff, and members of the public enjoyed seeing rare and special collection items from collections such as: the Bancroft Pictorial Collections; Artists’ books from the Environmental Design Library and the Bancroft Library; prints from the Graphic Arts Loan Collection at Morrison Library; media resources from the Media Resources Center; image collections from the Visual Resources Center in the History of Art Department and the College of Environment Design; and many more!

 

openhouse 2

 

open house 3

 

open house 4

 

open house 5

 

Follow us on social media
Twitter: @ah_library_ucb
Instagram: berkeley_art_history_library

 

Bancroft roundtable reveals secrets to processing rare material

Bancroft Library manuscripts cataloger Kenna Fisher gives a presentation on two new library acquisitions at the Bancroft Library Roundtable: Solving Mysteries. The event was held at the Faculty Club on Feb. 15, 2018. (Photos by Cade Johnson for the University Library)
Bancroft Library manuscripts cataloger Kenna Fisher gives a presentation on two recent library acquisitions at the Bancroft Library Roundtable: Solving Mysteries event at the Faculty Club on Feb. 15, 2018. (Photos by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Kenna Fisher is the manuscripts cataloger at The Bancroft Library.

But another apt title might be treasure hunter.

At a lunchtime roundtable on Thursday, Fisher took audience members behind the scenes of the fifth floor of Bancroft, where rare materials are investigated and their secrets unturned. The talk, called “Solving Mysteries At the Bancroft Library: The Fifth (Floor) Dimension,” attracted an eclectic mix of community members, professors, and Library staff, who gathered in the Faculty Club’s Lewis-Latimer Room, filling every chair.

Last year, Fisher received a journal — one of many that have crossed her desk over the years. But this one stood out: It wasn’t just a diary, but a “Ship Capitol’s Log Book.” The journal tells the story of a passenger aboard one of the earliest ships to sail for California during the Gold Rush, arriving in San Francisco in July 1849. It’s full of ornate drawings of large ships and harbors, along with song lyrics by other passengers.

And, on top of all that, a mystery: The signature on the “property of” inscription was not entirely legible, and it did not match the handwriting in the rest of the journal. The vendor who sold the journal had told Fisher they didn’t know who wrote it.

“But I’m a little stubborn, and I’m curious: Who is this guy who signed it?” she said. “And that’s when I started to dig.”

Attendee talks
Left to right, acquisitions assistant Rachel Lee, map metadata and curatorial specialist Heiko Mühr, and curator José Adrián Barragán-Álvarez were among those in attendance.

The inscription included two unclear initials and the last name Maraspin, the year 1917, and an address in Massachusetts. From that alone — with the help of Google and Ancestry.com — Fisher was able to track down the mystery identities. Paul Maraspin had authored the journal, and Francis Lothrop Maraspin (F.L. Maraspin) — his son — had signed it 68 years later. The address on the journal — 117 Court St., Boston, Massachusetts — exactly matched the address given by Francis Maraspin on a Sons of the American Revolution application form from 1935.

“I literally stood up at my desk and cheered,” Fisher said. “‘Yes! Got him.’”

Then, by checking passenger lists from the voyage, she tracked down the name of the journal’s illustrator — using just the initials scribbled in the corner of the drawings.

Fisher also shared her experience unpacking rare materials belonging to Dr. Raymond Arthur Babcock, who was captain of the Masonic Ambulance Corps in the 91st Division of the United States Army during World War I. After the war, Babcock returned to Willits, where he became the beloved country doctor known for driving his Buick to his patients’ homes as far up the hills as it would go and then trekking through mud the rest of the way.

Babcock, like Maraspin, kept a remarkable diary, full of not only WWI stories, but also notes on medical cases and instructions on how to set up field hospitals. The materials in Bancroft also include a canteen engraved by a cartoonist who served with Babcock, and a locket containing Babcock’s Mason membership information.

Among the trinkets was what looked like a strange pair of brass scissors, with a rectangular bulge on the handle and a curved tip. Fisher guessed that it was a medical object, perhaps, but an audience member spoke up, solving the mystery.

“That’s a candle snuffer, isn’t it? We have one in our house from the 1920s,” he said.

Attendee talks
Randal Brandt, head of cataloging, participates in the event.

In fact, tipoffs such as that are a fun and important resource for Librarians. The research team does their best to describe material, but sometimes there are very few leads to follow. The case of the Gold Rush journal, in which each clue led to another, was an “extraordinary circumstance,” said Randal Brandt, head of cataloging at Bancroft. “A lot of times, we can’t do that.”

By making collections publicly available, though, the Library can crowdsource its puzzles to the community, collecting invaluable tidbits from unexpected places. At the Bancroft Library, visitors can fill out a form to further enlighten curators about material they come across.

“We have to describe things to the best of our ability, put it out there, and then hope that somebody, someday, comes in and finds it and says, ‘Hey, I know more about this — that person was my grandfather,’” Brandt said. “We always look for that.”

Judy Nakadegawa, a Berkeley resident who often attends the roundtables, said she appreciated the diverse gathering of community and staff members. She found Thursday’s roundtable especially compelling.

“Even if it’s a specific subject that I think I don’t have a particular interest in, the talk is always interesting,” she said.

Cambridge Structural Database 2018 Available

The 2018 Cambridge Structural Database System (including ConQuest and Mercury) is available for downloading from the UC distribution site. The Cambridge Structural Database is crystal structure database, with over 900,000 entries for organic and organometallic compounds.

Downloading CSD:

  • You must be on the campus network or wifi or using VPN to access the files on that page.
  • Don’t forget the site and confirmation codes, which you can get by clicking Berkeley (UCB) link. You’ll need those codes during the CSDS installation.
  • CSDS is available for Windows, OSX, and Linux/Unix. It is recommended that you uninstall CSDS 2017 before you start this installation.
    • There’s an additional Windows application that can be downloaded separately. CrossMiner is a “novel tool that allows crystal structure databases such as the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to be searched in terms of pharmacophore queries.”
  • You can also search the CSD structures through WebCSD, without installing any software.

CSDS Documentation:

Please contact Kortney Rupp if you have questions about CSD.

Art + Feminism + Race + Justice Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Art + Feminism + Race + Justice Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Drop in any time, stay as long as you like!

Tuesday, March 6, 12:00pm-5:00pm

Moffitt 405

wiki

Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity is not: content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an important repository of shared knowledge. Let’s change that! Drop by the A+F Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, learn how to edit Wikipedia and make a few changes of your own! This year, we’re partnering with the American Cultures program and expanding the scope to highlight the theme of race and justice. We are now calling it the Art+Feminism+Race+Justice Wikipedia Edit-a-thon.

 

  • People of all gender identities and expressions welcome.

  • Bring a laptop.

  • Drop in for half an hour or stay for the whole afternoon.

  • No editing experience necessary; we’ll provide training and assistance.

    • Optional: Training sessions at 12:30 & 2:30.

    • Get a headstart! Create an editing account ahead of time.

  • Refreshments will be provided.

 

Learn more!

http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/wikipedia-edit-a-thon

RSVP (encouraged, but not required)

 

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