New Art History Books for September 2017

You can find these titles and other recent acquisitions on the Art History and Classics Library’s New Book Shelf.

 

 

 

 

La rentrée littéraire

September is the month when an unusually high concentration of new publications are released to the European market, notably in France and Belgium. While it may take a few more weeks for these books to reach us in Berkeley and get cataloged, some are already making their way to the shelves. Remember, all new books destined for the Main Stacks are first displayed on the third floor of the Moffitt Library and also listed on the recent acquisitions lists for French, Italian and Iberian studies in OskiCat for your convenience. Enjoy!

Want to upgrade your digital skills? The Library’s Level Up initiative can help.

Virtual reality, fake news, do-it-yourself web design — what do these things have in common? All are part of our ever-changing information landscape, for better or worse. And all are explored in a new initiative, Level Up, which aims to help students take a closer look at the technology in their lives through dozens of fall workshops and online guides. Want to learn about 3-D printing? Need help getting started on a research project? We’ve got students covered.

“We want to empower students to create new media, experiment with emerging technologies, and be critical consumers of information in an age when bogus stories are increasingly common,” says E-Learning and Information Studies Librarian Cody Hennesy, who is designing and implementing the initiative.

This week, the Library launched a Level Up web resource, which includes information for students interested in enhancing their digital information skills and teaching tools for faculty members on these topics.

Video: Center for Connected Learning: The Undergraduate ‘Collider Space’

Moffitt Library provides undergraduates with something that no other space on campus can — a place where students of all disciplines can come together to actively discover, develop and prototype solutions that change the world. As the undergraduate hub for connected teaching, learning, and discovery at Berkeley, Moffitt Library now serves 10,000 students each day. “This is a very special place,” explains University Librarian Jeffrey MacKie-Mason.

And this is just the start. This summer, the Library received campus approval to build a campaign for the Center for Connected Learning at Moffitt Library. The Library is now laying the groundwork to bring together students, faculty, Library staff, and supporters to design an innovative and interactive teaching and learning space that spans all five floors of Moffitt Library.

We envision the Center for Connected Learning as a “collider space” where students flow between multimedia classrooms, collaborative project spaces, hands-on studios, and peer-to-peer and expert consultation — all within the same building. Students would have access to one-stop consultation on retrieval, evaluation and use of advanced information resources, tech support, and the skills required for 21st century information literacy.

Watch our video, Center for Connected Learning: The Undergraduate Collider Space, to learn more.

Summer Reading: The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer

The Emperor of All Maladies

The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer
Siddhartha Mukherjee
New York: Scribner, 2011

A very readable Pulitzer Prize winner. Despite the somewhat depressing topic, I couldn’t put it down. Maybe our future students will find a cure.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

UPDATE: Elsevier Data Publishing Requirements

Last spring, we posted about data publishing requirements from Elsevier, Springer/Nature, and AAAS. At the time, Elsevier was the most lenient on their data publishing policies and used language that was suggestive and encouraging of data publishing. As of September 5th, 2017, that is no longer the case. Elsevier has signed on to the Transparency and Openness Guidelines (TOP) through the Center for Open Science. We talk and write a lot about transparency, openness, and sharing in science; however, there is a disconnect between the conversations and the daily workflows and practice of scientists. I was once told, after giving a workshop on data sharing, that I was an idealist trying to preach to realists. In order to close that gap, we need more publishers, like Elsevier, to make the ideal a reality, and enforce strict guidelines on data sharing and publishing.

Elsevier Logo

 

Let’s take a look at the 5 new data sharing requirements, which will be implemented for 1800 of Elsevier’s titles:

Option A:  you are encouraged to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article

Option B: you are encouraged to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • If you can’t do this, be prepared to explain why!

Option C: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • if you can’t do this, be prepared to explain why!

Option D: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article

Option E: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • peer reviewers will review the data prior to publication

The new Elsevier policy is similar in nature to Springer/Nature with their tiered system of requirements. It’s important to check with your individual journal to see which option it falls under. Ideally, you will always follow option E, where you make your data openly available, cited, linked, and provide the proper amount of metadata to go through the peer review process or be reused by another researcher.

 

If you have any questions about how to enrich the metadata of your dataset, or where to deposit your research data, please email researchdata@berkeley.edu!

 

 

Workshops on Scopus for literature searching and research impact

Want to make the most of our subscription to Scopus to improve your literature searching or evaluate your research impact? Attend one of our upcoming Scopus workshops! The Library is hosting two back-to-back workshops on September 28 to provide tips on using this large abstract and citation database covering the peer-reviewed literature across disciplines.

Scopus banner image

Advanced Literature Searching with Scopus
September 28 | 2-3 p.m. | Bechtel Engineering Center, Kresge Engineering Library Training Room 110MD

Want to improve your literature searching and save yourself time? This workshop will cover advanced searching with Scopus, a large abstract and citation database covering the peer-reviewed literature: scholarly journals, books, and conference proceedings. The database covers publications in science, technology, medicine, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Come learn useful tips and techniques for finding relevant publications for your literature reviews.

Scopus Tools for Assessing Research Impact
September 28 | 3-4 p.m. | Bechtel Engineering Center, Kresge Engineering Library Training Room 110MD

This workshop will cover tools and techniques available in the citation database Scopus for maximizing and assessing your research impact. Topics to be covered include: citation analysis for authors, comparing journals with CiteScore, linking your Scopus Author ID to your ORCID ID, and using PlumX metrics in Scopus.

We encourage you to register online for these workshops but drop-ins will also be welcome as space allows.

COLLECTIONS as CONNECTORS Holdings from Off-Center

by Steven Black, Bancroft Acquisitions

Things fall apart; the center cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world…
–William Butler Yeats, from “The Second Coming”

As they do in a teeming metropolis, connections occur naturally among collections in libraries and other repositories. These linkages may involve ideas and people, whether by description (cataloging and metadata), archival arrangement, researcher access and review, or, in the case of a new exhibit at The Bancroft Library, by time-shifted serendipity.

“The Summer of Love, from the Collections of The Bancroft Library” fortuitously brings together two representative figures who, in 1967, circled each other warily, but never met.

Joan Didion

Joan Didion in Golden Gate Park’s Panhandle, near Oak and Ashbury, 1967, photographed by Ted Streshinsky, BANC PIC 2004.132–NEG, M674-2, frame 9A

Joan Didion’s reportage in “Slouching Towards Bethlehem” is highlighted in a timely Bancroft exhibition along with images of the hippie scene in San Francisco taken by photographer Ted Streshinsky.

One thread running through her piece (in a reproduction of her typescript essay as submitted for later book publication) is a search for the Communication Company printer and publisher Chester Anderson.

Chester Anderson

Photo of Chester Anderson from the back cover of The Butterfly Kid. New York : Pyramid Books, 1967., p PS3551.N358 B8 1967

Funded by proceeds from his cult-hit novel The Butterfly Kid (1967), Anderson arrived in the Haight district of San Francisco just as the seeds for the coming “Summer of Love” were sown.  In January 1967 he purchased a state-of-the-art mimeograph machine from Gestetner “to provide quick & inexpensive printing service for the hip community.”

Among the works issued by this newest member of the Underground Press Syndicate were innumerable Diggers flyers and handbills, a chapbook by Richard Brautigan (All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace), revolutionary manifestos, notices for performances, the Invisible Circus, other happenings, and street level public service announcements.

Gentleness: a play in infinite acts ., 1967, The Communication Company, publisher Chester Anderson papers, BANC MSS 92/839 c, box 1, folder 3

In her quest, Didion describes meeting Com/Co’s co-founder, who (she writes) “says his name is Claude Hayward, but never mind that because I think of him just as The Connection.”

As she is on assignment for a mainstream publication, Didion is considered (in a Diggers phrase-du-jour) to be “a media poisoner.” The Connection urges her to dump the photographer she is with “and get out on the Street” leaving her cash (“You won’t need money”) behind.

Responding to her request to speak directly with Chester Anderson, The Connection says:  “If we decide to get in touch with you at all, we’ll get in touch with you real quick.” Although she crosses paths with The Connection again that spring in the Panhandle during an agitprop intervention by the San Francisco Mime Troupe, his passive refusal to hook her up rebuts his street-inflected nickname.

Joan Didion was unable to find the oracular man who could ostensibly help her understand “the scene,” or genius loci. Despite this missed connection with Chester Anderson, by detailing her forays into the Haight-Ashbury and other hippie enclaves around San Francisco, Didion captured in prose a time in violent flux. “Slouching” became the title essay of her celebrated first book of non-fiction, securing her reputation as a caustic and insightful social seismograph.

janis didion excerpt

Joan Didion papers, BANC MSS 81/140 c, carton 1

Today their works are co-located in Bancroft’s Summer of Love retrospective: two radically different writers can be seen in a long-delayed meeting that eluded them in real life.

*                          *                          *

Provenance notes:

Joan Didion (1934-) Joan Didion’s manuscript (BANC MSS 81/140 c carton 1) came to The Bancroft Library as a gift of the author.

Chester Valentine John Anderson (1932-1991) Chester Anderson’s papers (BANC MSS 92/839 c) came to The Bancroft Library via friend and fellow underground journalist Paul Williams.

Paul Williams (1948-2013) founded Crawdaddy, the first zine of rock and roll journalism (predating Rolling Stone), authored many works of hippie (Apple Bay: or, Life on the planet) and new age journalism (Das Energi), books on Bob Dylan and Philip K. Dick (whose literary executor he was, for close to 20 years). Through his imprint Entwhistle Books, he published two books by Chester Anderson:  Fox & hare : the story of a Friday night (f PS3551.N358 F6 1980 Bancroft) and Puppies (p PS3572.A395 P9 1979 Bancroft) under Anderson’s pseudonym John Valentine.

Ted Streshinsky (1923–2003) Ted Streshinsky’s photo archive (BANC PIC 2004.132) was a gift of his wife Shirley.

Workshop: Image Copyright for the Dissertation and Beyond

Join us for a workshop and discussion on image copyright, designed for graduate students working with visual media.

Wednesday, September 27
12:00-2:00 in 308A Doe Library, (inside the Art History/Classics Library)

Presented by:
Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communications Officer
Lynn Cunningham, Art Librarian

 

copyright workshop

Ecocity Berkeley: Thirty Years On

Woman watering a garden planted inside a car

September 15 – December 15, 2017
Environmental Design Library – 210 Wurster Hall

In 1987 Richard Register released his first major book, Ecocity Berkeley: Building Cities for a Healthy Future, inserting “ecocity” into the urban planning lexicon. Using Berkeley as a test bed, he promoted a new vision for urban development; his ideas and drawings presaged a number of contemporary design elements, tuning architecture and urban design to nature’s and human needs and desires. This exhibit explores his inspiring vision and its international influence.

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