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Digital Humanities Grant Opportunities for Art Historians

3D Photogrammetry For Cultural Heritage Workshop

CFP deadline December 1, 2017.

A one-week training workshop (March 25-31, 2018) at UCSC on photogrammetry for early-stage graduate students. Participants in this workshop will gain intensive hands-on experience in the techniques and processing workflow for photogrammetric recording for cultural heritage projects, presented within the context of a critical engagement in discussions of the politics of digital knowledge production. Click here for more information: ARC Photogrammetry Workshop Call UCSC.

 

Research Project: Ed Ruscha’s “Streets of Los Angeles”

CFP deadline January 19, 2018.

Scholars from a wide range of fields are invited to submit proposals for research projects investigating Ed Ruscha’s “Streets of Los Angeles” archive—including, but not limited to digital humanities, cultural geography, architecture, art history, photography, and visual culture. Interdisciplinary approaches and team-based projects are particularly encouraged. Selected researchers would collaborate with Getty Research Institute (GRI) staff as part of a larger research-technology project, which seeks to digitize and make publicly-accessible a portion of the archive in innovative ways. The goal is to publish resulting scholarship at the close of the project. For more details, click here.

 

Visualizing Venice Summer Institute: Advanced Topics in Digital Art History: 3D (Geo)Spatial Networks

CFP deadline Janurary 5, 2018.

This Getty Foundation supported workshop will support interdisciplinary teams focused on the hard questions of Digital Art History as a discipline, a set of methods, and a host of technical and institutional challenges and opportunities.

Participants will gather from June 4-16, 2018 in Venice, Italy at Venice International University, with follow-up activities taking place over the course of the 2018-19 academic year, and leading into a follow-on gathering in Summer of 2019 that will operate as a writing and digital publication workshop, building upon work done over the course of the year by the project teams and in collaboration with our wider network.

 

NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

CFP deadline January 16, 2018.

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (DHAG) support digital projects throughout their lifecycles, from early start-up phases through implementation and long-term sustainability. Experimentation, reuse, and extensibility are hallmarks of this grant category, leading to innovative work that can scale to enhance research, teaching, and public programming in the humanities.

This program is offered twice per year. Proposals are welcome for digital initiatives in any area of the humanities.

 

 

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Event: Affordable Course Content Workshops

Friday, Dec. 8

Open Textbook Workshop – Faculty & Lecturers

9:30-11:30 a.m. | Academic Innovation Studio, 117 Dwinelle Hall

Are you an instructor who is concerned about the impact of high textbook costs on your students?  Are you considering adopting or creating innovative pedagogical materials?  Explore possible open textbook solutions by attending a two hour workshop and writing a short textbook review.  The Library will provide you with a $200 stipend for your efforts!  Space is limited, so please submit a very brief application form:

http://bit.ly/facultyOpenTextwkshp

Friday, Dec. 8

Open Textbook Workshop – Staff & Campus Partners

12:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. | Academic Innovation Studio, 117 Dwinelle Hall

Register http://bit.ly/openwkshpcampuspartners

Are you a UC Berkeley staff or affiliate who is concerned about the impact of high textbook costs on students, or you are working with a faculty member who is?  Do you want to support the adoption or creation of innovative pedagogical materials?  Learn the landscape, opportunities, and challenges for open textbooks, and how to discuss whether open textbooks are a good fit.

Tuesday, Feb. 20

Publish Digital Books and Open Textbooks with Pressbooks

1:10-2:30 p.m. | Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle Hall 117 (Level D)

Register http://bit.ly/0220pressbooks

If you’re looking to self-publish work of any length and want an easy-to-use tool that offers a high degree of customization, allows flexibility with publishing formats (EPUB, MOBI, PDF), and provides web-hosting options, Pressbooks may be great for you.  Pressbooks is often the tool of choice for academics creating digital books, open textbooks, and open educational resources, since you can license your materials for reuse however you desire.  Learn why and how to use Pressbooks for publishing your original books or course materials.  You’ll leave the workshop with a project already under way!

Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) workshop

Ingenuity Pathway Analysis

A representative from Qiagen will offer a hands-on training workshop on using IPA to interpret expression data (including RNA-seq).

Date: Thursday, Nov. 9
Time: 1:30-4:30 pm
Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 Valley Life Sciences Building

You are invited to participate in this free training, and are encouraged to bring your own laptop or use the computer workstations in our training room.

Please register if you are interested in attending.

The workshop will cover how to:

  • Format, upload your data, and launch an analysis
  • Identify likely pathways that are expressed
  • Find causal regulators and their directional effect on gene functions and diseases
  • Build pathways, make connections between entities, and overlay multiple datasets on a pathway or network
  • Understand the affected biological processes
  • Perform a comparison analysis: utilize a heat map to easily visualize trends across multiple time points or samples

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith (esmith@library.berkeley.edu)

Event: HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) UnCamp

The UC Berkeley Libraries are excited to host the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) UnCamp, on January 25-26, 2018.
HTRC UnCamp 2018 aims to bring together researchers, developers, instructors, librarians, and other information professionals to showcase innovative research, participate in hands-on coding and demonstration sessions, and build community around themes of digital libraries, metadata, copyright, digital humanities, computational text analysis, and digital pedagogy. The UnCamp will discuss topics relevant to understanding and utilizing the HathiTrust Digital Library, including:
  • Demystifying HathiTrust metadata
  • Fair use, copyright, and non-consumptive research
  • HathiTrust development, news, and updates
  • Digital pedagogy and text analysis curricula
  • Scholarly tools and methods for text analysis
  • Corpus creation
  • Early registration price of $100 through November 29, 2017.
  • Standard price of $150 begins on November 30, 2017.
More info is available from the Library news.

Event: Workshops for faculty and graduate students

The Library is excited to share news and registration info for a full slate of informative and practical workshops and panels during Open Access Week, Oct. 23-27.  The events are intended to help attendees enhance their scholarly publishing skill sets and knowledge, by covering topics related to dissertation and book publishing, copyright, peer review, scholarly impact, and more.  You can read more in this blog post: http://news.lib.berkeley.edu/2017/09/28/boost-your-scholarly-publishing-skills-during-open-access-week-oct-23-27/

 

Monday, Oct. 23
Copyright and Your Dissertation
1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall
From the beginning of the writing process to submitting and publishing your dissertation or thesis, we will walk you through a useful workflow for addressing copyright and other legal considerations.

 

Tuesday, Oct. 24
Publishing Your Dissertation
2-3:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall
Hear from expert panelists about what happens once you submit your dissertation, how to shape your dissertation’s impact, and how to go about publishing your first book.

 

 Wednesday, Oct. 25
Increasing and Monitoring Scholarly Impact
10-11:30 a.m. | 309 Sproul Hall
Discover strategies and tips for preparing and promoting your scholarship, and the best ways to monitor and increase your citations and success. You’ll also learn how to: understand metrics, select and use scholarly networking tools, choose reputable open access journals and publishing options, and participate in open access article and book funding opportunities.

 

Thursday, Oct. 26
Understanding the (Changing) Realm of Peer Review 
1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall
Are you publishing an article or reviewing someone else’s work? Panelists demystify the peer review process, what’s expected of you and what you’ll experience, and how the world of peer review is evolving with new models that foster transparency and impact.

 

Friday, Oct. 27
Making Textbooks and Course Readers Affordable
11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Wurster Hall, Environmental Design Library
Do you wonder how to make your assigned readings more affordable, and how much time and effort you’d need to invest? The University Library and Center for Teaching and Learning have partnered in an innovative pilot program to reduce course content expenses and incentivize the creation of high quality, free, and open course materials. In this panel event, you’ll hear from participating faculty and lecturers who will discuss their experiences and provide practical tips from the leading edge of course content affordability.

Events: 2 Google Workshops (one of them is mine)

Google logoHere are upcoming workshops on Google-related tools. Snacks and soft drinks will be provided.

Google Search Tips, Tricks and Hacks
October 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Library
Refresh your memory on a variety of tricks and strategies to make searching Google, Google Scholar, and all Google’s information products more productive. Taught by Jennifer Dorner and Jesse Silva. (RSVP here)

New Google Sites workshop: Organize, collaborate and share
October 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Library
October 16 | 3-4 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Library
Learn how to organize, collaborate, and share online content in the New Google Sites. Sites offers an intuitive drag & drop interface, responsive design, and pre-defined templates. Whether for school, work, play, family, or social, Sites is a simple way to design, manage, and publish a website, wiki, or portfolio, without any prior programing or design skills.Taught by Jen Bellenger and Rob Silva from the bConnected Team. (RSVP here)

Workshops: Digital Publishing

flyer imageWhether you are looking to create a companion website for your book or a full-scale digital project, this workshop series is designed to get you up and running with the user-friendly, open source web publishing platforms Scalar, WordPress, Omeka and Drupal.

  • All platforms are easily managed right through your web browser.
  • No programming or coding knowledge is required.
  • Options for hosting will be covered.
  • Technology workshops will be hands-on; bring a laptop if you can.

This series is designed for faculty, graduate students, and staff in the Humanities and Social Sciences and is open to any member of the UC Berkeley community. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

WordPress for Easy and Attractive Websites
Thursday, April 20, 4-5pm
Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle Hall 117 (Level D)

In this hands-on workshop, we will learn the basics of creating a WordPress site, a web-based platform good for blogs, scholarly portfolios, and websites. By the end of the workshop, you will know how to post content, embed images and video, customize themes and appearance, and work with plugins.
Register

Omeka for Digital Collections and Exhibits
Wednesday, April 26, 1-2pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

Omeka is ideal for creating and displaying an online collection or exhibit composed of many digital items. If you have a bunch of digital images, scans, and files around a certain theme or project, and you would like to organize, describe, and showcase these files, Omeka may be a good fit for you. In this hands-on workshop, we will learn how to add and describe items in Omeka, the basics of the Dublin Core metadata schema, and how to create webpages with the Simple Pages plugin.
Register

Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects
Thursday, April 27, 11-12noon
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

This training will help you navigate the copyright, fair use, and usage rights of including third-party content in your digital project. Whether you seek to embed video from other sources for analysis, post material you scanned from a visit to the archives, add images, upload documents, or more, understanding the basics of copyright and discovering a workflow for answering copyright-related digital scholarship questions will make you more confident in your publication. We will also provide an overview of your intellectual property rights as a creator and ways to license your own work.

Designing in Drupal
Friday, April 28, 11-12noon
Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle Hall 117 (Level D)

Drupal is a powerful open source content management system that provides a flexible platform for developing web-based digital research projects. This workshop will cover the basics of how Drupal works, how you can create templates for storing your research materials, and how you can organize, display, and analyze those materials. Drupal is a good choice for many kinds of projects, including websites and projects underpinned by a database.

Scalar for Multimedia Digital Projects
Tuesday, May 2, 5-6pm
Berkeley Center for New Media Commons, 340 Moffitt

Developed by the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, Scalar is a web platform designed especially for multimedia digital projects and for multimedia academic texts. Like WordPress, it is easy to create content, but it is distinguished by multiple ways of navigating through a project, annotation and metadata features, and image and video options. Choose it to develop born digital projects and books, or as a companion site for traditional scholarship. In this hands-on workshop, we’ll learn how to create a Scalar project, create pages and media, add metadata and annotations, and define paths.

Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Advanced PubMed workshop

PubMed logo

Want to make your searches for biomedical information more effective and efficient? The Library’s Life and Health Sciences Division is holding a hands-on workshop on advanced features of PubMed, including:

  • How to use filters to focus search results on specific article types, publication dates and more
  • How to add field tags to find articles by author, title, journal, and other criteria
  • How Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) can help you find additional relevant information
  • How to use My NCBI to save searches, set up alerts, and display results in your preferred format
  • How PubMed links to information in other NCBI resources

Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 VLSB
Date: Wednesday April 12
Time: 12 – 1 pm

No pre-registration is required; all are welcome.

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith at esmith@library.berkeley.edu

Great talks and tips in Love Your Data Week 2017

This week, the University Library and the Research Data Management program were delighted to participate in the Love Your Data (LYD) Week campaign by hosting a series of workshops designed to help researchers, data specialists, and librarians to better address and plan for research data needs. The workshops covered issues related to managing, securing, publishing, and licensing data. Participants from many campus groups (e.g., LBNL, CSS-IT) were eager to continue the stimulating conversation around data management. Check out the full program and information about the presented topics.

Photographs by Yasmin AlNoamany for the University Library.

The Securing Research Data Panel.

The first day of LYD week at UC Berkeley was kicked off by a discussion panel about Securing Research Data, featuring
Jon Stiles (D-Lab, Federal Statistical RDC), Jesse Rothstein (Public Policy and Economics, IRLE), Carl Mason (Demography). The discussion centered upon the rewards and challenges of supporting groundbreaking research when the underlying research data is sensitive or restricted. In a lively debate, various social science researchers detailed their experiences working with sensitive research data and highlighted what has worked and what has proved difficult.

Chris Hoffman illustrated Securing Research Data – A campus-wide project.

At the end, Chris Hoffman, the Program Director of the Research Data Management program, described a campus-wide project about Securing Research Data. Hoffman said the goals of the project are to improve guidance for researchers, benchmark other institutions’ services, and assess the demand and make recommendations to campus. Hoffman asked the attendees for their input about the services that the campus provides.

The attendees of Securing Research Data workshop ask questions about data protection.
Rick Jaffe and Anna Sackmann in the RDM Tools and Tips: Box and Drive workshop.

On the second day, we hosted a workshop about the best practices for using Box and bDrive to manage documents, files and other digital assets by Rick Jaffe (Research IT) and Anna Sackmann (UC Berkeley Library). The workshop covered multiple issues about using Box and bDrive such as the key characteristics, and personal and collaborative use features and tools (including control permissions, special purpose accounts, pushing and retrieving files, and more). The workshop also covered the difference between the commercial and campus (enterprise) versions of Box and Drive. Check out the RDM Tools and Tips: Box and Drive presentation.

Anna and Rick ask attendees to do a group activity to get them talking about their workflow.

We closed out LYD Week 2017 at UC Berkeley with a workshop about Research Data Publishing and Licensing 101. In the workshop, Anna Sackmann and Rachael Samberg (UC Berkeley’s Scholarly Communication Officer) shared practical tips about why, where, and how to publish and license your research data. (You can also read Samberg & Sackmann’s related blog post about research data publishing and licensing.)

Anna Sackmann talks about publishing research data at UC Berkeley.

In the first part of the workshop, Anna Sackmann talked about reasons to publish and share research data on both practical and theoretical levels. She discussed relevant data repositories that UC Berkeley and other entities offer, and provided criteria for selecting a repository. Check out Anna Sackmann’s presentation about Data Publishing.

Anna Sackmann differentiates between different repositories in UC Berkeley.
Rachael Samberg, UC Berkeley’s Scholarly Communication Officer.

During the second part of the presentation, Rachael Samberg illustrated the importance of licensing data for reuse and how the agreements researchers enter into and copyright affects licensing rights and choices. She also distinguished between data attribution and licensing. Samberg mentioned that data licensing helps resolve ambiguity about permissions to use data sets and incentivizes others to reuse and cite data. At the end, Samberg explained how people can license their data and advised UC Berkeley workshop participants to contact her with any questions about data licensing.

Rachael Samberg explains the difference between attribution and license.
Rachael Samberg explains the difference between attribution and license.

Check out the slides from Rachael Samberg’s presentation about data licensing below.

 

The workshops received positive feedback from the attendees. Attendees also expressed their interest in having similar workshops to understand the broader perspectives and skills needed to help researchers manage their data.


Yasmin AlNoamany

Special thanks to Rachael Samberg for editing this post.

Webinar: Cultural Competencies for an Aging LGBTQ Population

Want to learn more about the aging LGBTQ population? Interested in improving cultural competency for this vulnerable population? Then you might want to attend this free webinar by HRSA, to be held on Tuesday, December 13th from 10am-12pm PST.

This webinar will discuss the health and social care needs of older adults in the LGBTQ community. It will highlight the special obstacles faced by this population, opportunities to improve cultural competency and best practices to integrate LGBTQ-friendly care into your organization.

The webinar should be of interest to HRSA grantees, healthcare providers, public health officials, community-based organizations and advocates wanting to improve competency in serving the needs of aging LGBTQ patients in their practices.

Please be sure to register in advance as space is limited.

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