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Library Leaders Forum 2016

2016-10-27 Libraries Leaders-162
The aerial shot of the group at the Library Leaders Forum 2016 by Brad Shirakawa

On October 26-28, I had the honor of attending the Library Leaders Forum 2016, which was held at the Internet Archive (IA). This year’s meeting was geared towards envisioning the library of 2020. October 26th was also IA’s 20th anniversary. I joined my Web Science and Digital Libraries (WS-DL) Research Group in celebrating IA’s 20 years of preservation by contributing a blog post with my own personal story, which highlights a side of the importance of Web preservation for the Egyptian Revolution. More personal stories about Web archiving exist on WS-DL blog.

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Brewster Kahle opens the Library Leaders Forum 2016

In the Great room at the Internet Archive Brewster Kahle, the Internet Archive’s Founder, kicked off the first day by welcoming the attendees. He began by highlighting the importance of openness, sharing, and collaboration for the next generation. During his speech he raised an important question, “How do we support datasets, the software that come with it, and open access materials?” According to Kahle, the advancement of digital libraries requires collaboration.

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IA’s Golden Floppy

After Brewster Kahle’s brief introduction, Wendy Hanamura, the Internet Archive’s Director of Partnership, highlighted parts of the schedule and presented the rules of engagement and communication:

  • The rule of 1 – Ask one question answer one question.
  • The rule of n – If you are in a group of n people, speak 1/n of the time.

Before giving the microphone to the attendees for their introductions, Hanamura gave a piece of advice, “be honest and bold and take risks“. She then informed the audience that “The Golden Floppy” award shall be given to the attendees who would share bold or honest statements.

Next was our chance to get to know each other through self-introductions. We were supposed to talk about who we are, where we are from and finally, what we want from this meeting or from life itself. The challenge was to do this in four words.

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“Partnership is important for advancing the library system”, Sylvain Belanger.

After the introductions, Sylvain Belanger, the Director of Preservation of Library and Archives in Canada, talked about where his organization will be heading in 2020. He mentioned the physical side of the work they do in Canada to show the challenges they experience. They store, preserve, and circulate over 20 million books, 3 million maps, 90,000 films, and 500 sheets of music.

We cannot do this alone!” Belanger exclaimed. He emphasized how important a partnership is to advance the library field. He mentioned that the Library and Archives in Canada is looking to enhance preservation and access as well as looking for partnerships. They would also like to introduce the idea of innovation into the mindset of their employees. According to Belanger, the Archives’ vision for the year 2020 includes consolidating their expertise as much as they can and also getting to know how do people do their work for digitization and Web archiving.

After the Belanger’s talk, we split up into groups of three to meet other people we didn’t know so that we could exchange knowledge about what we do and where we came from. Then the groups of two will join to form a group of six that will exchange their visions, challenges, and opportunities. Most of the attendees agreed on the need for growth and accessibility of digitized materials. Some of the challenges were funding, ego, power, culture, etc.

Chris Edwards from the Getty Research Institute.
Chris Edwards from the Getty Research Institute.

Chris Edward, the Head of Digital Services at the Getty Research Institute, talked about what they are doing, where they are going, and the impact of their partnership with the IA. Edward mentioned that the uploads by the IA are harvested by HathiTrust and the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA). This allows them to distribute their materials. Their vision for 2020 is to continue working with the IA and expanding the Getty research portal, and digitize everything they have and make it available for everyone, anywhere, all the time. They also intend on automating metadata generation (OCR, image recognition, object recognition, etc.), making archival collections accessible, and doing 3D digitization of architectural models. They will then join forces with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) community to develop the capability to represent these objects. He also added that they want to help the people who do not have the ability to do it on their own.

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Wendy Hanamura is presenting the IA’s strategic plan for 2015-2020

After lunch, Wendy Hanamura walked us quickly through the Archive’s strategic plan for 2015-2020 and IA’s tools and projects. Some of these plans are:

  • Next generation Wayback Machine
    • Test pilot with Mozilla so they suggest archived pages for the 404
    • Wikimedia link rots
  • Building libraries together
  • The 20 million books
    • Table top scribe
    • Open library and discovery tool
    • Digitization supercenter
    • Collaborative circulation system
  • Television Archive — Political ads
  • Software and emulation
  • Proprietary code
  • Scientific data and Journals – Sharing data
  • Music — 78’s

No book should be digitized twice!”, this is how Wendy Hanamura ended her talk.

img_6973Then we had a chance to put our hands on the new tools by the IA and by their partners through having multiple makers’ space stations. There were plenty of interesting projects, but I focused on the International Research Data Commons– by Karissa McKelvey and Max Ogden from the Dat Project. Dat is a grant-funded project, which introduces open source tools to manage, share, publish, browse, and download research datasets. Dat supports peer-to-peer distribution system, (e.g., BitTorrent). Ogden mentioned that their goal is to generate a tool for data management that is as easy as Dropbox and also has a versioning control system like GIT.

After a break Jeffrey Mackie-Mason, the University Librarian of UC Berkeley, interviewed Brewster Kahle about the future of libraries and online knowledge. The discussion focused on many interesting issues, such as copyrights, digitization, prioritization of archiving materials, cost of preservation, avoiding duplication, accessibility and scale, IA’s plans to improve the Wayback Machine and many other important issues related to digitization and preservation. At the end of the interview, Kahle announced his white paper, which wrote entitled “Transforming Our Libraries into Digital Libraries”, and solicited feedback and suggestions from the audience.

Brad Shirakawa
The photographer Brad Shirakawa while taking  an aerial shot at the Great room.

At the end of the day, we had an unusual and creative group photo by the great photographer Brad Shirakawa who climbed out on a narrow plank high above the crowd to take our picture.

On day two the first session I attended was a keynote address by Brewster Kahle about his vision for the Internet Archive’s Library of 2020, and what that might mean for all libraries.

Heather Christenson from HeathiTrust.
Heather Christenson from HeathiTrust.

Heather Christenson, the Program Officer for HathiTrust, talked about where HeathiTrust is heading in 2020. Christenson started by briefly explaining what is HathiTrust and why HathiTrust is important for libraries. Christenson said that HathiTrust’s primary mission is preserving for print and digital collections, improving discovery and access through offering text search and bibliographic data APIs, and generating a comprehensive collection of the US federal documents. Christensen mentioned that they did a survey about their membership and found that people want them to focus on books, videos, and text materials.

A panel discussion about the Legal Strategies and Practices for libraries.
A panel discussion about the Legal Strategies and Practices for libraries.

Our next session was a panel discussion about the Legal Strategies Practices for libraries by Michelle Wu, the Associate Dean for Library Services and Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, and Lila Bailey, the Internet Archive’s Outside Legal Counsel. Both speakers shared real-world examples and practices. They mentioned that the law has never been clearer and it has not been safer about digitizing, but the question is about access. They advised the libraries to know the practical steps before going to the institutional council. “Do your homework before you go. Show the usefulness of your work, and have a plan for why you will digitize, how you will distribute, and what you will do with the takedown request.”

Tom Rieger talks about the LOC’s 2020 strategic plan.
Tom Rieger talks about the LOC’s 2020 strategic plan.

After the panel Tom Rieger, the Manager of Digitization Services Section at the Library of Congress (LOC), discussed the 2020 vision for the Library of Congress. Reiger spoke of the LOC’s 2020 strategic plan. He mentioned that their primary mission is to serve the members of Congress, the people in the USA, and the researchers all over the world by providing access to collections and information that can assist them in decision making. To achieve their mission the LOC plans to collect and preserve the born digital materials and provide access to these materials, as well as providing services to people for accessing these materials. They will also migrate all the formats to an easily manageable system and will actively engage in collaboration with many different institutions to empowering the library system, and adapt new methods for fulfilling their mission.

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In the evening, there were different workshops about tools and APIs that IA and their partners provided. I was interested in the RDM workshop by Max Ogden and Roger Macdonald. I wanted to explore the ways we can support and integrate this project into the UC Berkeley system. I gained more information about how the DAT project worked through live demo by Ogden. We also learned about the partnership between the Dat Project and the Internet Archive to start storing scientific data and journals at scale.

Notes from “Long-Term Storage for Research Data Management” session.

We then formed into small groups around different topics on our field to discuss what challenges we face and generate a roadmap for the future. I joined the “Long-Term Storage for Research Data Management” group to discuss what the challenges and visions of storing research data and what should libraries and archives do to make research data more useful. We started by introducing ourselves. We had Jefferson Bailey from the Internet Archive, Max Ogden, Karissa from the DAT project, Drew Winget from Stanford libraries, Polina Ilieva from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), and myself, Yasmin AlNoamany.

Some of the issues and big-picture questions that were addressed during our meeting:

  • The long-term storage for the data and what preservation means to researchers.
  • What is the threshold for reproducibility?
  • What do researchers think about preservation? Does it mean 5 years, 15 years, etc.?
  • What is considered as a dataset? Harvard considers anything/any file that can be interpreted as a dataset.
  • Do librarians have to understand the data to be able to preserve it?
  • What is the difference between storage and preservation? Data can be stored, but long-term preservation needs metadata.
  • Do we have to preserve everything? If we open it to the public to deposit their huge datasets, this may result in noise. For the huge datasets what should be preserved and what should not?
  • Privacy and legal issues about the data.

Principles of solutions

  • We need to teach researchers how to generate metadata and the metadata should be simple and standardized.
  • Everything that is related to research reproducibility is important to be preserved.
  • Assigning DOIs to datasets is important.
  • Secondary research – taking two datasets and combine them to produce something new. In digital humanities, many researchers use old datasets.
  • There is a need to fix the 404 links for datasets.
  • There is should be an easy way to share data between different institutions.
  • Archives should have rules for the metadata that describe the dataset the researchers share.
  • The network should be neutral.
  • Everyone should be able to host a data.
  • Versioning is important.

Notes from the other Listening posts:

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Polina Ilieva from UCSF wrapped up the meeting.

At the end of the day, Polina Ilieva, the Head of Archives and Special Collections at UCSF, wrapped up the meeting by giving her insight and advice. She mentioned that for accomplishing their 2020 goals and vision, there is a need to collaborate and work together. Ilieva said that the collections should be available and accessible for researchers and everyone, but there is a challenge of assessing who is using these collections and how to quantify the benefits of making these collections available. She announced that they would donate all their microfilms to the Internet Archive! “Let us all work together to build a digital library, serve users, and attract consumers. Library is not only the engine for search, but also an engine for change, let us move forward!” This is how Ilieva ended her speech.

It was an amazing experience to hear about the 2020 vision of the libraries and be among all of the esteemed library leaders I have met. I returned with inspiration and enthusiasm for being a part of this mission and also ideas for collaboration to advance the library mission and serve more people.

–Yasmin AlNoamany

ChemSearch Challenge 2016

The Elsevier-Reaxys ChemSearch Challenge is a chemistry search competition. A new challenge consisting of four or five questions will be posted every week for 8 consecutive weeks, and players compete on the speed with which they can submit correct answers.

Players can compete as individuals or groups, and a $200 donation will be made on behalf of each week’s winner to their choice of Doctors Without Borders, World Wildlife Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council, Partners in Health, or Oxfam International. In order to compete, an account is required.

The first challenge was posted on October 17, and subsequent challenges will be posted every Monday at 12 pm GMT.

For more information, please see:

Connect Your Scholarship: Open Access Week 2016

Open Access Week 2016

Open Access connects your scholarship to the world, and for the week of Oct. 24-28, the UC Berkeley Library is highlighting these connections with five exciting workshops and panels.

What’s Open Access?

Open Access (OA) is the free, immediate, online availability of scholarship. Often, OA scholarship is also free of accompanying copyright or licensing reuse restrictions, promoting further innovation. OA removes barriers between readers and scholarly publications—connecting readers to information, and scholars to emerging scholarship and other authors with whom they can collaborate, or whose work they can test, innovate with, and expand upon.

Open Access Week @ UC Berkeley

OA Week 2016 is a global effort to bring attention to the connections that OA makes possible. At UC Berkeley, the University Library—with participation from partners like the D-Lab, California Digital Library, DH@Berkeley, and more—has put together engaging programming demonstrating OA’s connections in action. We hope to see you there.

Schedule

To register for these events and find out more, please visit our OA Week 2016 guide.

  • Digital Humanities for Tomorrow
    2-4 pm, Monday October 24, Doe Library 303
  • Copyright and Your Dissertation
    4-5 pm, Monday October 24, Sproul Hall 309
  • Publishing Your Dissertation
    2-3 pm, Tuesday October 25, Sproul Hall 309
  • Increase and Track Your Scholarly Impact
    2-3 pm, Thursday October 27, Sproul Hall 309
  • Current Topics in Data Publishing
    2-3 pm, Friday October 28, Doe Library 190

You can also talk to a Library expert from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. on Oct. 24-28 at:

  • North Gate Hall (Mon., Tue.)
  • Kroeber Hall (Wed.–Fri.)

Event attendance and table visits earn raffle tickets for a prize drawing on October 28!

Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Library, and organized by the Library’s Scholarly Communication Expertise Group. Contact Library Scholarly Communication Officer, Rachael Samberg (rsamberg@berkeley.edu), with questions.

Primary Sources: UCLA KTLA News Project

screenshot of news broadcast
Martin Luther King, Jr. campaigns for civil rights in Los Angeles.
The UCLA Film & Television archive recently added to its collection 100 clips of news footage from the 1950s to the 1980s filmed by Los Angeles station KTLA-TV.

According to the press release, “The curated news segments document local, national and international issues, covering politics, economics, civil rights and women’s activism, as well as African-American, Asian-American, Mexican-American, Native American and LGBT communities. Additional news stories on an expanded range of topics will be added to the portal on a periodic basis.”

Publish in RSC journals for free

RSC Gold for Gold

The UC Berkeley Library is partnering with the Royal Society of Chemistry to support free Open Access publishing under the RSC’s Gold for Gold initiative.

But you must act soon: the Gold for Gold program will only continue until March 2017.

The program offers voucher codes that enable Berkeley researchers to publish their papers in Royal Society of Chemistry journals free of charge, as Gold Open Access (OA) articles, without paying the normal article publication fee (between £1000 and £2500).

You are eligible if:

  • You are a UC Berkeley affiliate (faculty, staff, or student)
  • Your article is new and has been accepted for publication by RSC (i.e., vouchers cannot be used for articles that have already been published) and
  • You have not previously received a Gold for Gold voucher from the UC Berkeley Library in 2016

The application form is available at http://goo.gl/GAUwr, and as noted above, vouchers must be used by March 2017.

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith, Interim Chemistry Librarian, at esmith [at] library.berkeley.edu

Two New Journals Now Available, and One Discontinued

The Public Health Library is pleased to announce that you now have access to the full text of two new journals:

* AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control

* Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology

Along with this change, we have discontinued access to the full text of the Archives of Disease in Childhood. You will still be able to see articles from Volume 81 (July 2001) to Volume 101 Number 6 (June 2016), but if you need any others, you can request them through our Document Delivery service.

NCBI bioinformatics tools: An introduction

NCBI-Logo_sm

A hands-on workshop introducing NCBI bioinformatics tools such as PubMed, Gene, Protein, Nucleotide, and BLAST:

  • Starting with a disease, syndrome, or process, identify the genes/proteins involved
  • Starting with an organism and a protein, find the protein sequence and gene coding region
  • Starting with a sequence, identify the gene/protein and source

The workshop will cover selecting the proper tools for your question, navigating through the interlinked NCBI databases, and saving your results.

  • Date: Wednesday, Sept. 7
  • Time: 12 – 1 pm
  • Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2189 VLSB (inside the library)

Add this workshop to my bCal

Open to all interested students and researchers; no registration is required.

Questions? Contact esmith@library.berkeley.edu

Chinese Consul General: East Asian Library serves as gateway between China, U.S.

Peter X. Zhou, left, shares some of the library’s unique treasures with Luo Linquan, center, and his wife Qiao Li.
Peter X. Zhou, left, shares some of the library’s unique treasures with Luo Linquan, center, and his wife Qiao Li. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)

 

By the University Library, UC Berkeley

Chinese Consul General to San Francisco Luo Linquan and his wife Qiao Li visited the C.V. Starr East Asian Library at the University of California, Berkeley on Tuesday, August 23. Luo presented a $25,000 gift to the library, which will primarily be used to purchase Chinese publications that will serve the informational, educational and cultural needs of scholars and patrons.

“To see is to believe,” said Consul General Luo, on his first visit to the East Asian Library. “When I saw this new shining and spacious building, I was convinced and impressed.”

Luo said that the services and scholarship provided by the East Asian Library strengthen exchanges between the two countries and “inject new and positive energy into China-U.S. relations.”

Peter X. Zhou, assistant university librarian and director of the East Asian Library, shared selected treasures from the East Asian Library collection, including a Buddhist sutra with an engraving date of 1115 and one of the first books to employ separate woodblocks for each color printed.

“We appreciate the support from the Chinese consulate general,” Zhou said. “Their wonderful gift will allow us to expand and further build our Chinese collections. The success of our work depends in large measures on the support from friends like the consul general and donors around the globe.”

Luo toured the library’s peaceful study spaces and rare book vault before attending a luncheon hosted by the library as a thank you for the gift and goodwill.

“The Berkeley Library is deeply grateful to Consul General Luo Linquan and the consulate for their support,” said University Librarian Jeff MacKie-Mason. “Our Starr East Asian Library provides public access to one of the most comprehensive collections of rare, historical and contemporary scholarly materials from China in the country, and thus serves as a valuable cultural, historical, and social bridge between our two nations.”

The C.V. Starr East Asian Library contains one of the most vast collections of materials in East Asian languages in the United States. Its combined holdings total over one million volumes in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and other East Asian languages, making it one of the top two such collections in the United States outside of the Library of Congress.

Director of the C.V. Starr East Asian Library Peter X. Zhou, left, receives a gift from Chinese Consul General to San Francisco Luo Linquan.
Director of the C.V. Starr East Asian Library Peter X. Zhou, left, receives a gift from Chinese Consul General to San Francisco Luo Linquan. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)
Rare materials from the C.V. Starr East Asian Library collection.
Rare materials from the C.V. Starr East Asian Library collection. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)
Chinese Consul General to San Francisco Luo Linquan studies a rare book.
Chinese Consul General to San Francisco Luo Linquan studies a rare book. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)
Peter X. Zhou, left, presents the library’s rare book room.
Peter X. Zhou, left, presents the library’s rare book room. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small for the University Library)

New Student Tech Support Desk in Moffitt Library

As part of a project called Student Computing @ Cal, that was funded over the summer by the Student Technology Fund, a new technology help desk launched on Monday, August 22 today in Moffitt Library.

Undergraduate and graduate students can stop by and get help with their own laptops, phones, tablets or other personal devices.

Help includes, but is not limited to:

  • Setting up your AirBears2 key
  • Downloading Cal provided software, such as the Adobe Creative Suite
  • Removing viruses

The technology help desk is located on the back side of the ID check desk inside the main 3rd floor entry.

Hours are posted at: https://rescomp.berkeley.edu/units/moffitt/

Students can call or email for help when the desk isn’t staffed (or any time):

A Night With Voice of Witness: August 16 @ 6pm in the MLK Student Union at UC Berkeley

This Tuesday—August 16, 2016—please join us along with Voice of Witness for an evening of oral history and human rights. OHC interviewer, Shanna Farrell, will moderate a lively discussion between Voice of Witness editors, Peter Orner (Underground America: Narratives of Undocumented Lives) and Robin Levi (Inside this Place, Not of it: Narratives from Women’s Prisons) on the intersections of oral history methods, access, and social justice.

The event will begin at 6pm in the MLK Student Union’s Tilden Room (5th Floor). Light refreshments will be served and Voice of Witness books will be available for purchase.

This event is sponsored by OHC’s Advanced Oral History Summer Institute, which brings together students, faculty and scholars from across the United States for an intensive week of study and discussion. For more details, see the Oral History Center website.

Oral History Center event flyer
Oral History Center event flyer

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