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War Ink project, program coming to Doe Library

War Ink image of veteran with tattoos

Photographs from the War Ink project can be viewed in the Doe Library during the month of November. (Photo courtesy War Ink)

Photographs from the celebrated War Ink Project will be on display in Berkeley’s Doe Library in November. The exhibit features striking images of tattoos that express the impact of combat experiences on California veterans. 

Jason Deitch, co-creator of War Ink and a Cal veteran, hopes the display will “bridge the divide between the veterans and civilian communities.” The project is “both exhibit and forum, using tattoos as a springboard for California veterans to share their stories,” Deitch explains.

In anticipation of Veterans Day and to mark the exhibit opening, please join Deitch, Trésor Bunker, current vice president of the Cal Veterans Group, and members of the Cal Veteran community in a panel discussion focused on improving communication among veterans and civilians.

The discussion, titled Moving Beyond “Thanks” to Understanding Experience: Seeing Our Cal Veterans Through Profiles of Military and Lifelong Service and Transition Success, will take place on Friday, November 4 in the Morrison Library.

The program will incorporate personal experiences and methods for moving beyond stereotypical views of veterans and the often reflexive phrase “Thank you for your service” toward more meaningful communication as a key for improving reintegration after military service. There will be time to view the exhibit and to learn about the veterans pictured and the significance of the ink they wear.

When: Friday, November 4, 2016 5-7pm

Where: Morrison Library

Admission: Free and open to the public

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor prior to the event. The event sponsor is Ashley Bacchi, 510-664-7737.

It Takes a Village to Build a Society with 100% More Seniors

Free Speech Movement Cafè, Moffitt Library
Thursday, October 27, 2016
5:00-6:30pm

As baby-boomers reach retirement age, how is society preparing for the 100% growth in the number of seniors in America (from 35 million in 2000 to 72 million in 2030)? Forty years ago, there used to be 5 workers for each retiree. If present trends continue, there will be only 2 workers for every retiree by the year 2030. How is the system going to cope with a doubling in the linear growth of social security expenses and the exponential growth in the costs of Medicare? Can we build a more efficient, socially-active and supporting society? We present a solution that empowers seniors around mutual-support local communities called “villages”.

Guest Speakers:
Manuel Acevedo – HelpfulVillage.com, Founder
Andrew Scharlach – UC Berkeley School of Social Welfare, Professor. Foremost scholar on the Village Movement
Lisa Brinkmann – Marin Villages, Executive Director

FSM Cafe program - It Takes a Village - Oct. 27, 2016

This event is free, open to the public, and all are invited to participate. For more information: fsmprograms@lists.berkeley.edu

Download the event flyer (PDF)

Sponsored by the University Library’s Free Speech Movement (FSM) Café Programs Committee.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor — ideally at least two weeks prior to the event. The event sponsor is Jean Ferguson,fsmprograms@berkeley.edu, 510-768-7618.

Hands-On 6: Never Before Seen Artist Books

Friday, 10/28/16 4:00pm – 6:00pm

Environmental Design Library – 210 Wurster Hall

Handmade books by artists defy conventional “reading” by involving the viewer though sight, touch, and physical manipulation. Too often these wonderful works of art are locked behind the exhibit case. Our Hands On series at the Design Library make them available for you to touch, turn the pages, and explore. This event will open up the library’s vault to share some of our exquisite artist books.

abook-image

Handmade books in our collection are also available for viewing during reference desk hours, usually 1-5 Monday – Friday. While no appointment is necessary, you may want to contact us ahead of time to ensure their availability.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor — ideally at least two weeks prior to the event. The event sponsor is David Eifler, 510-643-7422, deifler@berkeley.edu.

Light Refreshments will be served.

Event: Bancroft Library Roundtable: Whose Story Gets Told?

bancroft roundtable flierThe next Bancroft Roundtable will take place in the Lewis-Latimer Room of The Faculty Club at noon on Thursday, October 20. Michael Helquist, public historian, will present “Whose Story Gets Told? Constructing a Biography When Sources Seem Too Limited.”

Public historian Michael Helquist argues that we lose an essential part of our history and a deeper sense of who we are by not knowing the life stories of marginalized people. He includes in that group women, racial minorities, working class and poor people, immigrants, political radicals, and LGBTQ people. His talk will feature an early woman physician and political radical, Marie Equi, who is little known, although she was one of the most prominent activists on the West Coast in the WWI era, a heroine after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and one of the first publicly known lesbians on the West Coast. Mr. Helquist will consider why her full story had not been told and will recount his discovery of troves of primary sources. He will present images of Dr. Equi and her life, from working in a textile mill to doing time in San Quentin. His biography, Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions, published by Oregon State University Press in 2015, was named a 2016 Stonewall Honor Book for Nonfiction by the American Library Association.

We hope to see you there.

José Adrián Barragán-Álvarez and Kathi Neal
Bancroft Library Staff

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you require disability-related accommodations, please contact The Bancroft Library at (510) 642-3781 — ideally at least two weeks prior to the event.

Bancroft Roundtable: Whose Story Gets Told? Constructing a Biography When Sources Seem too Limited

Bancroft Roundtable featuring Michael Helquist, Oct. 20, 2016

October 20th
12PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Michael Helquist, public historian

Public historian Michael Helquist argues that we lose an essential part of our history and a deeper sense of who we are by not knowing the life stories of marginalized people. He includes in that group women, racial minorities, working class and poor people, immigrants, political radicals and LGBTQ people. His talk will feature an early woman physician and political radical, Marie Equi, who is little known, although she was one of the most prominent activists on the West Coast in the WWI era, a heroine after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and one of the first publicly known lesbians on the West Coast. Mr. Helquist will consider why her full story had not been told and will recount his discovery of troves of primary sources. He will present images of Dr. Equi and her life, from working in a textile mill to doing time in San Quentin. His biography, Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions, published by Oregon State University Press in 2015, was named a 2016 Stonewall Honor Book for Nonfiction by the American Library Association.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor prior to the event. The event sponsor is Kathryn Neal, (510) 642-8173.

Post contributed by Kathryn Neal, Associate University Archivist, The Bancroft Library

National Novel Writing Month in the Library

NaNoWriMo 2016

Come Write In sessions are back at UC Berkeley. Have you ever thought about writing a novel, but just didn’t think you had the time? Well, a small group of friends from the East Bay dared themselves to finish their novels in 30 days back in 1999, and since then this humble non-profit, NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) has become a global event of epic proportions! 50,000 words in 30 days! Quantity over quality is the name of the game! Turn off your inner editor, let the words flow, and win!

The folks over at nanowrimo.org created this worldwide community of writers and a support system of libraries, bookstores, and other neighborhood spaces all over the globe called Come Write In, where “Wrimos” gather and forge ahead towards their word count goals during their quest to win this incredible book-in-a-month contest. With all the collective, creative, positive energy of over 300,000+ participants, all writing together, winning is possible! So, finish that paper, mid-term or lab report and come join us! Everyone that attended our sessions last year reached their word-count goals!

  • Sign up at nanowrimo.org and join the East Bay Home Region to see the calendar of events and further details for the UC Berkeley Doe Library location.
  • Come Write In at Doe Library – Room 303 Doe Library
    • Sundays, November 6, 13, 2016, 1 – 4pm
    • Sunday, November 20, 2016, 1 – 3pm
    • Wednesday, November 30, 2016, 6-9pm

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact Shannon Monroe at least two weeks prior to the event at smonroe@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6151.

Post submitted by Shannon L. Monroe, Head of Interlibrary Lending/Photoduplication Interlibrary Services

Story Hour in the Library featuring Karen Joy Fowler

Story Hour in the Library featuring Karen Joy Fowler

Date: Thursday, October 6, 2016
Time: 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Place: Morrison Library

Free and open to the public

Karen Joy Fowler, author of both novels and short story collections, has been described as “a captivating and good-hearted satirist.” Her six warmly-received novels include the bestselling The Jane Austen Book Club and most recently, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves. Fowler’s books have received many awards including the Commonwealth Medal, Winner of the 2014 PEN/Faulkner Award, and shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Fowler and her husband live in Santa Cruz, California.

We encourage you to purchase the book ahead of time, you may bring it to be signed

Story Hour in the Library is a monthly prose reading series held in UC Berkeley’s Morrison Library.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor prior to the event. The event sponsor is Ashley Bacchi.

 

Lunch Poems: Michael Palmer

Lunch Poems: Michael Palmer Oct. 6.

Michael Palmer (Image ©Chris Felver)

When: 12:10 pm – 12:50 pm, October 6, 2016
Where: Morrison Library
Cost: Free and open to the public

See the 2016-2017 series schedule.

From the Lunch Poems website:
Michael Palmer is a poet and translator who for over forty years has worked with the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company and has collaborated with many composers and visual artists. Among his numerous awards is the Arts and Letters Prize in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His work has been translated into over thirty languages and he himself has translated poems and prose from French, Brazilian Portuguese, and Russian. He has taught at universities in the United States, Europe and Asia. His most recent publications are Active Boundaries: Selected Essays and Talks, Madman With Broom (selected poems with Chinese translations by Yunte Huang), and Thread. Palmer’s new book of poems, The Laughter of the Sphinx, was published in 2016 by New Directions.

Ecosystems of California: author celebration Oct. 7

Author celebration October 7 - Ecosystems of California

Date: Friday, October 7
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Location: Marian Koshland Bioscience & Natural Resources Library, 2101 VLSB
Free and open to the public

The event will include a panel discussion with some of the UC Berkeley contributors; light refreshments will be offered.

Event sponsored by the UC Berkeley Library, Life & Health Sciences Division.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact Bioscience Librarians, 510-642-0456; bios@library.berkeley.edu prior to the event.

Post submitted by:
Susan Koskinen, Becky Miller, Elliott Smith, Life & Health Sciences Librarians

Global comics exhibit draws on librarian’s diverse background

Story by Damaris Moore, Library Communications
Video by Campus News Services; see story by Public Affairs

In 1991, Liladhar Pendse was working in food services at UCLA Catering after a move from the Soviet Union in search of a fresh start. A polyglot fluent in seven languages and familiar with an additional 13, Pendse frequently visited the library to borrow books from Russia and India. There, he encountered a librarian who ended up changing the course of his life.

Eudora Loh encouraged Pendse to attend classes and to consider librarianship as a career. “I was intimidated by librarians and computers,” Pendse recounts, “but she was so kind, showing me how to locate a book and walking me to the stacks. We started talking, became friends, and in time she encouraged me to attend classes at a local community college.”

Twenty five years and four degrees later, Pendse combines his passion for diversity, his love of language and his quest to share knowledge and information as a scholar librarian at UC Berkeley. This month, Pendse’s rich understanding of global materials is on display in an exhibit of comics and graphic novels from a dizzying array of cultures, including Egypt, Poland, South Africa, Israel, the Czech Republic, Colombia, and Japan.

“Beyond Tintin and Superman: The Diversity of Global Comics” can be viewed in Doe Library’s Bernice Layne Brown Gallery through March 2017. Pendse hopes that the exhibit will inspire viewers to reflect on issues treated in the materials — around censorship, race relations, political agendas and gender biases.

“The world has always been a violent place,” says Pendse. “And so my question as a professional is how can I contribute to peace? Through building our uniquely rich collections, and making information available, I believe I am contributing to increased understanding in the world and in cultures at large.”

Liladhar Pendse curated the Doe Library exhibit “Beyond Tintin and Superman: The Diversity of Global Comics.” (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

UC Berkeley Librarian Liladhar Pendse curated the “Beyond Tintin and Superman: The Diversity of Global Comics” exhibit, which can be viewed in the Doe Library through March 2017. Pendse collaborated with a number of skilled Library colleagues on the exhibit.  (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

From India to Belarus and the U.S.

Pendse grew up primarily in Mumbai, but spent parts of his youth in several regions of the then-Soviet Union due to the tumultuous political climate of the time. Although he had earned an M.D. in Internal Medicine in Belarus, Pendse realized he had to start over when he moved to the United States. He worked a variety of jobs while living in Los Angeles, and eventually found that education was his path to success.

He earned his BA in History and Arabic/Islamic Studies with honors from UCLA in 2004. After working in the UCLA library, he earned his MLIS and an MA in Latin American Studies. Following positions at UCLA’s Library and at Princeton, he came to Berkeley’s University Library in 2012. In 2013, he defended his Ph.D. at UCLA.

Growing up in three very different cultures inspired Pendse to focus his work on inclusion and acceptance of different types of people. He hopes that the materials in the “Beyond Tintin and Superman: The Diversity of Global Comics” exhibit help break down cultural barriers by offering authentic, personal accounts of social and political issues around the world.

The comics on display were curated by Pendse and include comics from his own personal collection. There is a copy of the DC Comics 1987 classic, Watchmen, as well as graphic novels and comics covering atomic bomb survivors, young Yemeni women forced into marriage, a collection created in response to the January 2015 terrorist attack on the French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo, love in a Japanese boys’ boarding school, and a translation of a two-volume work of a French professor of Middle Eastern studies/historian and an award-winning artist that tells the complicated stories of the United States involvement in the Middle East.

Librarian Liladhar Pendse enjoys the energy and diversity of Berkeley's Sproul Plaza. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

Librarian Liladhar Pendse appreciates the energy and diversity of Berkeley’s Sproul Plaza. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

“One person, one tongue”

At UC Berkeley, Pendse’s title is as long as an arm — Librarian for East European, Armenian, Caucasus, Central Asian, Balkan, Baltic, and Mongolian Studies, and Acting Librarian for African Studies.

His knowledge of many different languages has empowered him to work effectively across a diverse group of faculty, students and visiting scholars. Along with fluency in Marathi and Hindi/Urdu, Russian, Gujarati, Portuguese, Spanish, and English, he is at an intermediate level in Azerbaijani, Sanskrit, Arabic, and Turkish; and basic in Armenian, Romanian, French, Italian, Swahili, Polish, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Slovak, and Turkmen.

Previous exhibits Pendse has helped curate include displays of posters and printed works from Cuba and Soviet Union during the Cold war, and on the 1867 purchase of Alaska, highlighting the Library’s Russian-American collections. He is involved in planning several future exhibits, one on popular literature in Brazil, and another on Bollywood and Africa.

Asked about his extraordinary gift for languages, Pendse ties it to an abiding interest in understanding between cultures. A few years ago, an elderly woman in Istanbul repeated a saying to him: “one person one tongue (Bir lisan bir insan).” Pendse comments that “the more languages, the better you can reach out to other people.”

Pendse’s varied life path has fostered in him a deep personal appreciation of diversity. “The world of Berkeley is very meaningful to me,” he notes, especially “the spirit of flexibility and seeing things from others’ perspectives. Maybe you don’t agree, but you listen and you learn. Passing through Sproul Plaza on my way home from work, I feel invigorated and enriched by all the different people and activities. The vibrancy and the diversity of our community always inspires me!”

Exhibit opening reception
Date: Friday, October 14
Time: 5-7pm
Place: Morrison Library

Brown Gallery Viewing 5-5:30pm
Welcome & Introduction at 5:30pm with Liladhar Pendse, Exhibit Curator
with special guest speakers Ron Turner & Ivy Mills, Ph.D.
Enjoy the Exhibit 6:30-7pm

Ron Turner is the founder of the Last Gasp, a book and underground comics publisher and distributor based in San Francisco.
UC Berkeley Lecturer Ivy Mills, Ph.D. specializes in the visual and literary cultures of Africa and the African diaspora.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor prior to the event. The event sponsor is Ashley Bacchi, 510-664-7737.

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