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Reaxys 2.0 Migration

 

Logo for Reaxys Database

Reaxys is a web-based tool for the retrieval of chemistry information and data from published literature, including journals and patents.Chemists at Berkeley are active users of Reaxys, doing 1000’s of searches/month!

Elsevier has rolled out a new version of Reaxys (Reaxys 2.0) that has a number of enhanced features, including:

  1.       An increasingly simple user interface.  The opening page has spaces to (a) type in the search query in a search bar or (b) type in the name of the structure or draw the structure.
  2.       Search functions using the querylets to increase the specificity of the search and reduces the time that the user has to filter the results post search.
  3.       Search functions that contain auto suggest. Similarly it also searches for singular/plural and synonyms
  4.       Using Boolean operators (obviously one of Elsevier’s strengths)
  5.       Listing hits in the initial screen (post search).  No secondary search needed.
  6.       A big increase in the number of searchable Asian patents

The migration is Reaxys 2.0 is ongoing, but migration should be completed by November 30, 2017. Soon UCB users will be directed to the new interface, but will continue to have the option to use the old interface for the foreseeable future.

Romance Language Collections Newsletter no.1 (Fall 2016)

What’s new in the Library for Fall 2016? 
Piano_oriental_2
The graphic novel Le piano oriental by Zeina Abirached will be on display in the Doe Library exhibition Beyond Tintin and Superman: The Diversity of Global Comics opening September 19.

Welcome back everyone! Here’s a brief sum-up of new services and library resources with a focus on the Romance languages and southern European studies in particular.

New Blog – Over the summer the Library migrated all of its blogs to WordPress. From this point forward, please look here for all Romance Language Collections news. If you choose not to subscribe to the blog, don’t worry. I usually forward the most important posts to your respective department listservs.

Electronic Resources

OpenEdition Books – With a combination of generous discretionary and endowment funds, the Library was able to acquire the complete ebook catalogue of this open access book initiative based at Université d’Aix-Marseille. We now have enhanced and permanent access to more than 2700 open access books (most in French but also in Italian, Spanish and Portuguese) that can be read in four different formats (epub, pdf, html, or reader) from prestigious academic presses like CNRS Éditions, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, and l’École française de Rome. We have also have become partners in an acquisitions policy that both supports sustainable development of OA and that respects the needs of teaching, research and learning communities.

OpenEdition Journals – Also known as Revues.org, the Library has purchased permanent access to the 140 journals available through OpenEdition’s freemium model, eliminating moving walls and gaining similar formats enhancements as the ebooks. Representative titles include Arzanà: Cahiers de littérature médiévale italienne, Cahiers d’études romanes, Flaubert: Revue critique et génétique, and L’Atelier du Centre de recherches historiques.

Ebooks on Casalini’s Torrossa platform – Besides the Italian ebooks the Library receives through its subscription to Editoria Italiana Online, we added 200 additional titles last spring. Casalini Libri also unveiled a new reader in July which greatly improves the readability (especially on smartphones and tablets) of the near 2500 titles in Berkeley’s collection of Italian ebooks.

Kanopy and the Media Resources Center – New films and documentaries in the Romance Languages from not only Europe but also Africa and Latin America are regularly added to this online streaming service. Beginning this semester, check-out periods for DVDs and VHS tapes from the MRC will be extended to 7 days for faculty, lecturers and graduate student instructors!

(more…)

Access Scopus database for research in a variety of fields

Laptop with chart on screen

Find more results and uncover trends in your field through Scopus, a large abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.

The UC Berkeley Library is now providing access to this tool covering fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences and arts & humanities. More than half the content originates outside North America and the content includes journals, conferences, trade publications, and book series.

The database provides various ways to link to the full text of documents, including via UC-eLinks. Scopus offers several features including tools to track, analyze, and visualize your research.  Download references into a number of reference managers.

You’ll find Scopus in OskiCat and the A-Z List of Databases.


Post contributed by Jean McKenzie, Acting AUL, Collections

Resource: Russian National Bibliography

The Library recently acquired access through EastView to the Russian National Bibliography.

Included in the resource are: the definitive reference guide available to Russian book publications; indices to Russian journals, periodicals, and newspapers; book reviews found in the central and regional Russian press; synopses of dissertations from the Russian Federation; an index to Russian music-related publications; and an index of visual materials published or appearing in books, collected works, and magazines.

All of these can be searched separately or together. Use the Keyword search box to enter the keywords for your search. To the right of the Keyword search box you can select whether you want to conduct your search in Russian, English, or Transliteration. One thing to note here — by using English keywords for your search, your search will be on English-language sources only. If you want to run a search in Russian, but do not have a Russian keyboard driver installed in your system, click “Russian Keyboard.” A small window will pop up with a Russian keyboard that will enter the text you type on it directly into Keyword search box.

Resource: International Bibliography of Humanism and the Renaissance

The Library recently acquired from Brepolis the International Bibliography of Humanism and the Renaissance, a multi-disciplinary bibliography of the Renaissance and the early modern period (1500-1700) that includes entries for monographs, critical editions, translations, anthologies, miscellanies and exhibition catalogs, as well as specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias, handbooks, journal articles and reviews written in any language and presented in any format.

It reproduces online and continues the Bibliographie internationale de l’Humanisme et de la Renaissance, coordinated and published by Librairie Droz since 1965 (and located in our collection in the MAIN (Gardner) Stacks at CB361.1 .B52). The rights to the resource were acquired by Brepolis in 2013.

According to the site, the “core of the Bibliography focuses on European history and culture that spans the 16th and 17th centuries, and encompasses a broad spectrum of subjects, ranging from religious history through to philosophy, science and the arts; and from military and political history through to social and gender studies. Both the geographical and the chronological delimitations are not restrictive as the IBHR also includes publications on the European interactions with the wider world through exploration, colonisation, slavery and the Christian mission and extends its coverage to the modern period with the inclusion of modern hermeneutics, reception studies and the 21st c. teaching of texts written in the target period.”1

1 http://cpps.brepolis.net/ibhr/introduction.cfm

Resource: Bibliographie de civilisation médiévale (BCM)

A new database acquired from Brepolis is the Bibliographie de civilisation médiévale (Bibliography of Medieval Civilisation) (BCM) which indexes monographs and miscellanies as well as book reviews. It complements and can be simultaneously searched with the International Medieval Bibliography (IMB).

BCM originated in the printed bibliography published in the Cahiers de civilisation médiévale between 1958 and 2009, Initially dedicated to the High Middle Ages, its scope has broadened to cover Late Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages (300-1500). Continued selection and indexing of sources for the BCM is carried out at the Centre d’Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale. Bibliographic entries reflect the language of the original work, but the indexing of subjects and locations is in English.

In addition to standard limiters such as publication date and language, the Advanced Search option allows you to narrow your search to an academic discpline, geographic area, and range of centuries. UC-eLinks is enabled to facilitate retrieval of subscribed online sources.

Resource: Slavic Humanities Index

The Slavic Humanities Index is a bibliographic database in the field of Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern European Studies that provides access to scholarly periodicals published in the region that until now had remained largely unindexed. It currently contains over 225,000+ bibliographic citations from around 220 periodicals in twenty-one languages. Most periodicals are indexed from around 1994 to the current issue, but some select publications are indexed back into the 1980s. In the future, significant periodicals will be indexed retrospectively to provide a more comprehensive research tool.

The resource includes publications from Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Macedonia, Montenegro, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Ukraine and provides access to citations of articles, book reviews, and other materials across a wide range of disciplines.

The database can be searched using native alphabets or transliteration systems. See the search tips page for detailed instructions.

New Online Resources!

The Library has many new tools for research in areasdata base such as History, Native American Studies, International and Area Studies, Genetics, Gender and Women’s Studies, Design, Film and Media Studies, Environmental Studies, Engineering, Popular Culture, Music, Business, Agriculture, Literature, and more!

Complete list

Highlights: Science databases

Highlights: Historical primary source databases

Highlights: Humanities and Area Studies databases

ProQuest Historical Newspapers

The Library recently added a number of important historical newspapers to our growing digital collection in the ProQuest Historical Newspapers package*.

The Times of India was originally founded in 1838 as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce (1838-1859), it became the Bombay Times and Standard (1860-1861) after merging with two other popular newspapers. After another merger in 1861, it was renamed The Times of India (1861-present). Learn about the partition of India, the economic boom in the IT sector, Bollywood films or Sachin Tendulkar, one of the greatest batsmen of all time, in this rich primary resource.

The Los Angeles Sentinel (1934-2005) covers community and world issues from the unique cultural perspective of the Los Angeles African American community. Follow the grass-roots struggle against the racially restrictive housing covenants of the 1940s, or read Roy Wilkins’ column, “The Watchtower,” and see how he attacked efforts to label civil rights activists as “communists” during the Cold War.

The Guardian and The Observer cover over 200 years of British news (1791 -2003). The Guardian was first published in response to the Peterloo Massacre. Originally known as the Manchester Guardian, it was a Saturday-only paper until the newspaper stamp duty was repealed in 1855. The Observer, the world’s oldest Sunday paper, was first published in 1791. Thought-provoking writers such as George Orwell, Vita Sackville-West, Clive James, Philip Toynbee, and others were contributors, continuing a tradition of freedom of the press and providing serious coverage of politics and literature.

The Baltimore Afro-American (1893-1988) was founded by former slave John Henry Murphy, Sr. when he merged three church publications. The Baltimore Afro-American became one of the most widely circulated African-American newspapers on the Atlantic Coast, and included contributors such as writer Langston Hughes, intellectual J. Saunders Redding, artist Romare Bearden, and sports editor Sam Lacy, whose column influenced the desegregation of professional sports.

* This post is the fourth in a series highlighting important additions to our online resources. These purchases were made possible in large part with new library funding that resulted from the Commission on the Future of the UC Berkeley Library charged under EVCP George Breslauer and Chair, Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate, Elizabeth Deakin. For more information, read the Commission Report and Response.

Trial: Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginning to the Present

Until June 6, The Library has access to a trial of Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginning to the Present.

 Tabs lead the user to a brief overview of an author, a list of writings, a brief life (with bibliography of sources), an overview of life/writing (each with bibliographies), a lengthy timeline of events in the author’s life, and links to mentions of the author in other parts of Orlando. The timelines are quite helpful as is the ability to search by occupation, place and genre. Most interesting, perhaps, is the tag search, which allows the user to combine many different aspects of authors’s lives to create a dataset. I recommend you look at the PDF guide, which provides simple instructions for accessing the many features of the database.

A review of Orlando in Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature provides some background on the project and suggestions on how to best exploit its features. Excepts from additional reviews can be found on the Orlando site.

Please send your comments to Michaelyn Burnette.

(Miranda Hickman. “Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (review).” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 27.1 (2008): 181-186. Project MUSE. Web. 13 May. 2014.)

Share your experience with the GALC!

The Graphic Arts Loan Collection (GALC) at the Morrison Library was created in 1958 by Professor Herwin Schaefer, who believed the best way to foster an appreciation of art was for students to live with actual art. With that in mind, we would love to hear about your experience living with your GALC piece.

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