Seeking artists, photographers, data scientists, researchers and designers for Moffitt Library!

Moffitt Art Banner

Moffitt Library invites undergraduate students to submit their art or design works for the 2017-2018 academic year to be displayed on floors four and five. This opportunity is open to current undergraduates at UC Berkeley. Current pieces on display and full guidelines can be viewed online.We are interested in flat, wall-mounted works, including (but not limited to):

  • Paintings
  • Drawings
  • Photography
  • Data visualizations
  • Architectural designs
  • Research posters
  • Graphic designs

Submission deadline lis April 7, 2017. Decisions will be announced in early May. Please direct all questions and inquiries to Jean Ferguson, Learning and Research Communities Librarian, at jean.ferguson@berkeley.edu.

Apply here!

New Research In Oral History – Lunch Lecture: Exploring The African American Experience In the 19th and 20th Centuries through Oral History

Shirley Ann Wilson Moore, Professor Emerita of History, California State University, Sacramento
March 20, 2017 | 12-1:15 p.m. | 267 Bancroft Library

Professor Shirley Moore, an alumna of UC Berkeley, is the author of numerous works on African American history in the West, including “To Place Our Deeds: The African American Community in Richmond, California 1910-1963,” and most recently “Sweet Freedom’s Plains: African Americans on the Overland Trails 1841-1869. In the lunch lecture series, “New Research in Oral History,” Dr. Moore will discuss her use of oral history in these two books, as well as its overall importance in documenting the African American experiences in California and the West. Her research has been an invaluable resource for our Rosie the Riveter / World War II Oral History Project.

Write. Cite. Repeat.

Research management tools

Looking for an easy way to manage your research? The Library has you covered. We now offer premium access to three products — Overleaf, Mendeley, & ShareLaTeX — that make collaborative writing and citing in the engineering and physical sciences much easier. Sign up and learn more.

  • Overleaf is an online collaborative LaTeX editor with integrated real-time preview. It offers templates for arXiv and many journal publishers to help get you started, and it can also be linked to other services such as Mendeley, Git, and Plot.ly. A pro account (avaialable for free when you sign up with your Berkeley email) will provide up to 10GB storage space, 500 files per project, full project history, and the ability to save to Dropbox.
  • ShareLaTeX is also an online collaborative LaTeX editor. It too offers templates for arXiv and many journal publishers. With a premium account, you will get unlimited collaborators, full project history, and the ability to sync with Dropbox and Github.
  • Mendeley is a reference manager and academic social network that allows you to organize your references across multiple devices, automatically generate bibliographies, and share references with collaborators online. Your institutional account will provide up to 5GB personal library space, 20GB shared library space, 25 collaborators in private groups, and unlimited private groups.

Beware the Ides of March!

Beware the Ides of March!  As we remember the day that saw the assassination of Rome’s dictator perpetuo, UC Berkeley Classics Collections brings you a selection of five recent books on Julius Caesar.

 

Der Gallische Krieg

Der Gallische Krieg : Geschichte und Täuschung in Caesars Meisterwerk

By Markus Schauer

München : C.H. Beck, [2016]

PA6246 .S33 2016 Main Stacks

 

(more…)

Winter 2017, Fiat Lux Newsletter

The cover of Fiat Lux Winter 2017

The Winter 2017 issue of Fiat Lux, the Library’s newsletter, features stories about a project to categorize fake news stories; three unique digitization projects; and the completed renovation of Moffitt Library.

CRCnetBASE: Online Science Books

crcnetbase logo

Have you ever wished you could look up something in a scientific book when you are studying at home? If so, CRCnetBASE is the answer!

This online collection of books includes the following topics:

  • chemistry
  • engineering
  • environmental science
  • food science
  • math
  • neuroscience
  • statistics
  • and more!

You can search across all books, browse books by subject, and download the pdfs of chapters. All the books can be found searching OskiCat as well.

New Exhibit: Celebrating the Intellectual Legacy of Jeffrey Hadler (1968-2017)

Mount Merapi and Minangkabau long house by Edy Utama

February through September 2017
120 Doe Library

Throughout his life, Professor Jeffrey Hadler established himself as an accomplished scholar in Indonesian studies, authoring several books and a dozen articles. Over the last fifteen years, Professor Hadler selflessly dedicated his intellectual insight and guidance to the UC Berkeley academic community, enhancing the Library’s Southeast Asia collection. Additionally, he served in the following academic roles:

2009-2012: Southeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies
2011-2014: Chair, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
2011-2014: Southeast Asia Materials Project Executive Committee of the Center for Research Libraries
2014-2015: Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies
2016-2017: Academic Senate Library Committee

The display offers a selected collection of Professor Hadler’s works, course syllabi, and commencement photos with his graduate students, Iman Djalius (2012), Joseph Scalice and Kathleen Gutierrez (2014).

Photo credit: Mount Merapi and Minangkabau long house by Edy Utama.
Acknowledgements: Jenny Chiu, Iman Djalius, Vaughn Egge, Kathleen Gutierrez, Thiti Jamkajornkeiat, Quyen My Le, and Sarah Maxim.

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-ThonArt+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon
Tuesday, March 21st
1pm-6pm
Moffitt 405

Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the effect is not: content is skewed by the lack of female participation. Let’s change that! Drop by the Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, learn how to edit Wikipedia and make a few changes of your own!

People of all gender identities and expressions welcome. Bring a laptop (or use one of ours). No editing experience necessary, we’ll provide training and assistance. Drop-in for half an hour or stay for the whole afternoon. Food and drink will be provided.

Learn more!

 

Event: 19th-century Mormon maritime immigration

Icelandic immigrants on the ship Camoens, 1880s, National Museum of Iceland

The Bancroft Roundtable on March 16 will tell the captivating story of Mormon maritime immigration in the nineteenth century. Fred E. Woods, Professor of Church History and Doctrine at Brigham Young University, bases his account on hundreds of first-person immigrant accounts collected and dissected over the past two decades. The superior modus operandi used by the Latter-day Saints to bring European converts to America is described.

Event details
Bancroft Roundtable: “The Sail before the Trail or Have We Missed the Boat?”
Thursday, March 16, noon
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club
Presented by Fred E. Woods, Professor of Church History and Doctrine, Brigham Young University

Go from Analog to Digital Texts with OCR

OCR text

A collection of digitized texts marks the start of a research project —  or does it?

For many social sciences and humanities researchers, creating searchable, editable, and machine-readable digital texts out of heaps of paper in archival boxes or from books painstakingly sourced from overlooked corners of the library can be a tedious, time-consuming process.

Scholars using traditional methodologies may find it advantageous to have a digital copy of their source material, if only to be able to more easily search through it. For anyone who wants to use computational methods and tools, converting print sources to digital text is a prerequisite. The process of converting an image of scanned text to digital text involves Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. New developments in campus services are providing additional options for researchers who wish to prepare their texts this way.

What resources does UC Berkeley offer to convert scans to digital text?

  • For basic needs, try the Library’s scanners.
  • For documents with complex layouts or for additional language support, ABBYY FineReader with Berkeley’s OCR virtual desktop is a solution.
  • Finally, Tesseract can handle large scale OCR projects.

Books and simple documents: library scanners with OCR software

All of the UC Berkeley libraries, including the Main (Gardner) Stacks, have at least one Scannx scanner station with built-in OCR software. This software automatically identifies and splits apart pages when you’re scanning a book, and it performs OCR on any text it can identify. You can save your results as a “Searchable PDF” (with embedded OCR output) or as a Microsoft Word document, or you can save page images as TIFF, JPEG, or PDF files (omitting digitized text). For book scanning or simple document scanning, the library scanners can take you from analog to digital in a single step.

Complex layouts or language support: ABBYY FineReader and Berkeley Research Computing’s OCR virtual desktop

If your source material has a complex layout (like irregular columns, embedded images, and/or tables that you want to continue to edit as tables) or uses a non-Latin alphabet, ABBYY FineReader OCR may get you better OCR results. FineReader supports Arabic, Chinese, Cyrillic, Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, and Thai, among other languages.

On campus, FineReader is available on computers in the D-Lab (350 Barrows). From off campus, the OCR virtual research desktop provided through Berkeley Research Computing’s AEoD service (Analytic Environments on Demand, pronounced “A-odd”) allows users to log into a virtual Windows environment from their own laptop or desktop computer anywhere there’s an internet connection. If you’re visiting an archive and aren’t sure that your image capture setup is getting good enough results to use as OCR input, you can log into the OCR virtual research desktop and try out a couple samples, then refine your process as needed. You can also work on your OCR project from home, or on nights and weekends when campus buildings are closed. To use the OCR virtual research desktop, sign up for access at http://research-it.berkeley.edu/ocr.

FineReader is not generally recommended for very large numbers of PDFs because each conversion must be started by hand. However, if you don’t need to differentiate the origin of your various source PDFs (e.g., if your text analysis will treat all text as part of a single corpus, and it doesn’t matter which of the million PDFs any particular bit of text originally came from), you might be able to use FineReader by creating one or more “mega-PDFs” that combine tens or hundreds of source PDFs and letting it run over a long period of time. At a certain point, however, Tesseract might be a better choice.

OCR at scale: Tesseract on the Savio high-performance compute cluster

If you have thousands, hundreds of thousands, or millions of PDFs to OCR, a high-powered, automated solution is usually best. One such option is the open source OCR engine Tesseract. Research IT has installed Tesseract in a container that you can use on the Savio high performance computing (HPC) cluster. For researchers who are less comfortable with the command line, there is also a Jupyter notebook available that provides the necessary commands and “human-readable” documentation, in a form that you can run on the cluster. Any tenure-track faculty member is eligible for a Faculty Computing Allowance for using Savio. For graduate students, talk to your advisor about signing up for an allowance and receiving access.

No matter how large or small your OCR project is, UC Berkeley has the perfect tool for you in scanning equipment, ABBYY FineReader, or Tesseract. Happy converting!

 

Related Event: From Sources to Data: Using OCR in the Classroom

March 16, 2017

10:30am to 12:00pm

Open to: All faculty, graduate students, and staff

 

Questions?

Quinn Dombrowski, Research IT  quinnd [at] berkeley.edu

Stacy Reardon, Library  sreardon [a] berkeley.edu 
Thank you to Cody Hennesy for suggestions. Cross posted on the D-Lab blog and the Research IT blog.

 

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Edit Wikipedia tomorrow in Moffitt 405! Drop in any time 1-6pm or attend a workshop. t.co/8kwR1yFjGG

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"Open access will have a direct impact on Berkeley researchers. It provides an enhanced ability for faculty to... t.co/4Sa9NSk5Xc

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What could be better than books — and food? Join us to celebrate both on April 10. t.co/5d20NeRimr

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Live @ Hertz Hall with Senator Barbara Boxer for "An Election Like No Other and What Lies Ahead" t.co/cbI4qFYUAU

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Drop in Moffitt Library on Tuesday, March 21 from 1-6pm for a communal updating of Wikipedia entries. We will... t.co/fZ3W6nLEtL