Summer Reading: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
Matthew Desmond
New York: Crown Publishers, 2016

The day-to-day experiences of landlords, tenants, movers, sheriffs, and others wrapped up in the economy of eviction. A great companion to last year’s On the Same Page pick, Just Mercy; at one point, Desmond writes, “If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods, eviction was shaping the lives of women. Poor black men were locked up. Poor black women were locked out.” Desmond makes the compelling case that stable housing is a precondition for civic engagement and democracy, because civic life begins at home, and is rooted in a community. After telling the unforgettable stories of a few to illustrate the plight of millions of Americans, he devotes the epilogue to making broader policy recommendations that aim to break the cycle of eviction.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

June is Pride Month

SF Pride - June 24-25, 2017

#SFpride #summerOfLove50 #resist

Since 1970, Pride celebrates the resistance of the Stonewall Uprising of June 28,1969 and the struggle for human rights for all. Pride Month hasn’t been officially declared by the current president, but fortunately that won’t stop the celebration, or the resistance. If you’re looking for a good GLBTQIA movie or documentary — to learn, laugh or cry — Kanopy has almost 400 streaming videos on the diverse array of queer related themes, available to anyone on campus or to UCB via proxy or VPN. And of course we have lots of books, journals and databases as well!

Oral Histories on the Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: 1960 – 2014

Oral Histories on the Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: 1960 – 2014

These forty five oral history interviews are part of the larger oral history project: Oral Histories on the Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: 1960 – 2014. The project includes approximately seventy interviews conducted from 2009-2014 by John Cummins, Associate Chancellor – Chief of Staff, Emeritus who worked under Chancellors Heyman, Tien, Berdahl and Birgeneau from 1984 – 2008. Intercollegiate Athletics reported to him from 2004 – 2006. The purpose of the project is to explore the history of the management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley from the 1960s to the present. The interviews are with a cross sampling of individuals who played key roles in the management of intercollegiate athletics over that period of time: Chancellors, Athletic Directors, senior administrators, Faculty Athletic Representatives, other key faculty members, directors of the Recreational Sports Program, alumni/donors, administrators in the Athletic Study Center, and others.

Two publications by The Center for Studies in Higher Education at UC Berkeley, based in part on the oral histories, are listed below. The first (2013), co- authored by Cummins and Kirsten Hextrum, a PhD student in the Graduate School of Education, a member and two-time national champion of Cal Women’s Crew from 2003 – 2007, and a former tutor-adviser in the Athletic Study Center, addresses administrative and management issues at UC Berkeley that typically concern those responsible for the conduct of a Division I-A intercollegiate athletics program. It assumes that such a program will continue for many years to come and that it provides important benefits for the Cal community. Its focus is principally on the market-driven, multi-billion dollar phenomenon of the big-time sports of men’s football and basketball, their development over time and their intersection with the academic world. The Olympic or non-revenue sports at UC Berkeley more closely resemble the amateur intercollegiate ideal, with high graduation rates and successful programs. Even these sports programs, however, are gradually being pulled into the more highly commercialized model.

A second paper by Cummins (2017) deals with the history and financing of the construction of the Barclay Simpson Student Athlete High Performance Center and the renovation of Berkeley’s Memorial Stadium. These two interrelated projects, costing $474 million and largely debt financed, are the most expensive intercollegiate athletics capital projects in the nation. Their history and financing illustrate the complexity and challenges faced by university administrators in managing big-time intercollegiate athletics programs

THE MANAGEMENT OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS AT UC BERKELEY: TURNING POINTS AND CONSEQUENCES by John Cummins and Kirsten Hextrum CSHE.12.13 (November 2013).

A CAUTIONARY ANALYSIS OF A BILLION DOLLAR ATHLETIC EXPENDITURE by John Cummins, UC Berkeley CSHE 3.17 (February 2017).

New Release: Rick Laubscher – San Francisco Journalist, PR Executive, and Founder of Market Street Railway

Today we are excited to release the oral history interview of Rick Laubscher. Born in 1949, Rick came of age amid the bustle of Market Street at the family’s business, Laubschers’ Delicatessen. It was in these early years that he developed a fascination in transportation, and a special love of streetcars; the “iron monsters” that rumbled through the streets of San Francisco and past the family’s delicatessen. He spent countless hours as a child drawing city maps (to scale) for his collection of Matchbox trams and buses. And during the age of lava lamps and flower power, his dorm room walls at U.C. Santa Cruz were adorned with transportation maps. Indeed, Rick had what he called “the transportation bug,” a condition that would only grow in time.

On the campus of U.C. Santa Cruz, however, Rick also developed an interest in journalism. He created the University’s first radio station, albeit unregistered with the FCC, and upon graduation headed to New York to study at the Columbia School of Journalism, where he was awarded the Pulitzer Fellowship. Returning to California, he started his career as a broadcast journalist with KGTV in San Diego. Here he helped pioneer live reporting in the Southern California market, and won two “Golden Mike” awards for his work. In 1977, Rick returned home to San Francisco as a reporter for KRON-TV. If Herb Caen was the voice of San Francisco, Rick Laubscher was certainly seen by some as the dandy of the city’s television news. Immaculately dressed in a three-piece suit, Rick reported on a number of historic events, most notably the assassination of Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. Rick knew both the victims and the killer, and his coverage of the tragedy won him an Emmy Award.

In 1980, Rick left broadcast journalism to embark on a new career as a public-relations executive with the Bechtel Group in San Francisco. Over the next two decades, he worked around the world on behalf of Bechtel, crafting communication programs for both the company and their international clients. In the process, he helped mend relations between San Francisco and its business community, fostering a network of associates that would open the door for a dual career in civic service.

Rick’s affinity for streetcars is matched only by his love for San Francisco. And for nearly forty years, while working for Bechtel and later in private practice, he undertook numerous projects to give back to the City by the Bay. He served on the executive boards of the Chamber of Commerce, SPUR, and the JASON Foundation for Education, and was the founding Chairman of the City Club of San Francisco, one of the first fully open business and civic organizations in the City’s financial district. Above all, he revamped Market Street Railway, the nonprofit that brought vintage streetcars back to San Francisco. What started with an idea among likeminded enthusiasts—Rick calls it a “Mickey Rooney / Julie Garland Moment” of “Why don’t we get the kids together and put on a show”—finally took root in the summer of 1983 with San Francisco’s Historic Trolley Festival. Its popularity and international acclaim quickly made the festival an annual event. And by 1995, streetcars once again became permanent fixtures on the City streets. As President and CEO of Market Street Railway, Rick guided this effort with unrelenting energy. He assembled a diverse cast of supporters, searched around the world to secure additional streetcars, and skillfully navigated the city bureaucracy to make his vision of permanent streetcar lines to San Francisco a reality. For the fourth-generation San Franciscan who excitedly watched the “iron monsters” rumble down Market Street as a kid, it was simply a labor of love.

This oral history offers a look at San Francisco through the eyes of one of its remarkable residents. From journalism to business and an astonishing array of civic endeavors, Rick Laubscher helped shape the city he called home.

Summer Reading List: Benjamin Franklin: An American Life

Benjamin Franklin: An American Life

Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
Walter Isaacson
New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003

Among his many accomplishments, Franklin founded libraries, volunteer firefighting companies, and served as the United States’ first Postmaster General. According to Isaacson, Franklin was “the most accomplished American of his age and the most influential in inventing the type of society America would become.” During Franklin’s adulthood, the American ideals of civic life were crafted, along with many of the institutions which foster those ideals.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

GitHub: Archiving and Repositories

Github has become ubiquitous in the coding world and, with the advent of data science and computation in a slew of other disciplines, researchers are turning to the version control repository and hosting service. Google uses it, Microsoft uses it, and it’s on the list of the top 100 most popular sites on Earth. As a librarian and a member of the Research Data Management team, I often get the question: “Can I archive my code in my Github repository?” From the research data management perspective, the answer is a little sticky.

github mark

The terms “archive” and “repository” from GitHub mean something very different than their definitions from a research data management perspective. For example, in GitHub, a repository “contains all of the project files…and stores each file’s revision history.” Archiving content on GitHub means that your repository will stay on GiHub until you choose to remove it (or if GitHub receives a DMCA takedown notice, or if it violates their guidelines or terms of service).

For librarians, research data managers, and many funders and publishers, archiving content in a repository requires more stringent requirements. For example, Dryad, a commonly known repository, requires those who wish to remove content to go through a lengthy process proving that work has been infringed, or is not in compliance of the law (read more about removing content from Dryad here). Most importantly, Dryad (and many other repositories) take specific steps to preserve the research materials. For example:
* persistent identification
* fixity checks
* versioning
* multiple copies are kept in a variety of storage sites

A good repository provides persistent access to materials, enables discovery, and does not guarantee, but takes multiple steps to prevent data loss.

So, how can you continue to work efficiently through GitHub and adhere to good archival practices? GitHub links up with Zenodo, a repository based out of CERN. Data files are stored at CERN with another site in Budapest. All data is backed-up on a daily basis with regular fixity and authenticity checks. Zenodo assigns a digital object identifier to your code, making it persistently identifiable and discoverable. Check out this guide on Making Your Code Citable for more information on linking your GitHub with Zenodo. Zenodo isn’t perfect and there are a few limitations, including a max file size of 50 GB. Read more about their policies here.

UC-Berkeley has its own institutional version of GitHub, which means that Berkeley development teams and individual contributors can now have private repositories (and private, shared repositories within the Berkeley domain). If you’d like access, please email github@berkeley.edu. Additionally, we have institutional subscriptions to Overleaf and ShareLaTeX, both of which integrate with GitHub.

Please contact researchdata@berkeley.edu if you’d like more information about archiving your code on GitHub.

New Books In Graduate Services June 2017

Abstracts and brief chronicles of the time. I, Los, a chapter

Abstracts And Brief Chronicles Of The Time v.1: Los, A Chapter by Helene Cixous

Ego sum corpus, anima, fabula

Ego Sum: Corpus, Anima, Fabula by Jean-Luc Nancy

New library service!

UC Berkeley Global Resource Sharing

You can now pick up Interlibrary Loan items at most library locations and NRLF!

When you fill out your ILL request, just select the library you prefer from the pick up location list. You will be notified by email when the item is ready at your preferred location.

Remember to pick up ILL material by the hold expiration date or items will be returned to the lending institution.

Microform material will continue to be available as Library Use Only in the Newspaper & Microform Library, regardless of the pickup location selected.

New Books in Art History

You can find these titles and other recent acquisitions on the Art History and Classics Library’s New Book Shelf.

 

 

 

 

Summer Reading List: The Study Qu’ran: A New Translation and Commentary

The Study Qu'ran

The Study Qu’ran: A New Translation and Commentary
Seyyed Hossein Nasr
New York: HarperOne, 2015

Six years in the making, The Study Quran is described by its editor-in-chief, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, as “a small contribution to unity in the Islamic world.” More importantly, it is also an opportunity for non-Muslims to understand the Quran in historical context. Translated by a team of both Sunni and Shiite scholars of Islam, this edition of the Quran also offers in-depth commentaries to help place the book’s more controversial passages into historical context, and to examine the Quran from multiple Islamic spiritual, theological, and legal perspectives. Upon its publication in late 2015, the book sold out its first print run immediately — a rare feat for any book about religion.

At a moment when Islam is one of the world’s few religions that is growing instead of shrinking, the Quran and what it means to Muslims still remains a puzzle to many non-Muslims in the west. This book is an opportunity to reverse some of the Islamophobia that has been encroaching on many Americans by introducing us to the basics of what Muslims believe. As the current generation of Americans becomes less religious, and as religious literacy declines in the media while religious studies is also on the decline in academia, books like The Study Quran offer us an opportunity to change our perspectives about one of the world’s most misunderstood religions.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

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