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EZproxy is here!

As of today, EZproxy is available for off-campus access to licensed online resources. EZproxy allows users to connect to resources via CalNet sign-in or with their PIN / Cal 1 card number and without any configuration in a browser or device. No longer having to configure or install anything means that online resources are available from any computer anywhere.

EZproxy replaces our current home-grown Library proxy service. However, the home-grown proxy will be around until Summer 2018.

To learn more about EZproxy see our guide at guides.lib.berkeley.edu/ezproxy.

Summer reading: Design, When Everybody Designs

Design, When Everybody Designs

Design, When Everybody Designs: An Introduction to Design for Social Innovation
Ezio Manzini
Cambridge: MIT Press, 2015

A book that challenges people to use design methods and to work together to solve complex social issues. It includes case studies, like a collaborative housing program and community-supported agriculture (CSA).

That’s it for 2017 Summer Reading posts! See you next summer!

Movies @ Moffitt: Life After Life

Life After Life

Wednesday, November 1
Doors @ 6:30pm, show @ 7:00pm
405 Moffitt Undergraduate Library
Free; open to UCB students only (UCB student ID required).

Life After Life follows the stories of Harrison, Noel, and Chris as they return home from San Quentin State Prison. After spending most of their lives incarcerated, they are forced to reconcile their perception of themselves with a reality they are unprepared for.

Each struggles to overcome personal demons and reconstruct their fractured lives. Grappling with day-to-day challenges and striving for success, they work to reconnect with family and provide for themselves for the first time in their adult lives.

Told in an unadorned verite style, we experience the truth of their heartaches and triumphs. As their stories unfold over weeks, months and years, the precarious nature of freedom after incarceration in America is revealed.

Check out the website and view the trailer.

Summer Reading: The World We Made

The World We Made

The World We Made: Alex McKay’s Story from 2050
Jonathon Porritt
London: Phaidon Press, 2013

The book works from a visioning perspective to show a future state of the world in an upbeat, dynamic way, and that allows the reader to visualize a more sustainable planet and how we might get there.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Summer reading: How to Thrive in the Next Economy

How to Thrive in the Next Economy

How to Thrive in the Next Economy: Designing Tomorrow’s World Today
John Thackara
London: Thames & Hudson, 2015

In each chapter, this book addresses a wicked problem like water scarcity and provides a case study of how one or more communities have addressed the issue and been successful. The case studies show how large complex problems can be approached and are not so intractable.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Come Write In at UC Berkeley’s Doe Library

National Novel Writing Month 2017

Have you ever thought about writing a novel but just didn’t think you had the time? You’re not alone. A small group of friends from the East Bay dared themselves to finish their novels in 30 days back in 1999, creating the foundation of what has become National Novel Writing Month. Since then, this small nonprofit, NaNoWriMo, has inspired a global event of epic proportions! Fifty thousand words in 30 days! Quantity over quality is the name of the game. Turn off your inner editor, and win.

Are you working on a thesis, dissertation, or any other writing project (creative or otherwise) but could use a bit of support from the collective energy of fellow students or colleagues to help you stay focused and provide some inspiration? NaNoWriMo isn’t just for novels anymore — be a​ ​NaNoWriMo​ ​“Rebel,” and work on your academic projects, an article, a chapter, final research paper, memoir, screenplay, etc., and possibly find some new writing buddies along the way!

The amazing team over at NaNoWriMo created this worldwide community of writers and a support system of libraries, bookstores, and other neighborhood spaces all over the globe called Come​ ​Write​ ​In​, where “Wrimos” gather and forge ahead toward their word count goals during their quest to win this book-in-a-month contest. With all the positive energy of over 300,000 participants, all writing together, winning is possible. Novelist or academic, all are welcome. Since 2007, the incredible spirit of NaNoWriMo continues to motivate me to keep pushing forward, and I hope it will inspire you as well!

Come​ ​Write​ ​In​, ​Doe​ ​Library:
Nov. 5​, ​1-4 p.m.,​ ​Room​ ​180​ ​Doe
Nov. 12, ​1-4 p.m.,​ ​Room​ ​180​ ​Doe
Nov. ​19, 1-3 p.m.,​ ​Room​ ​180​ ​Doe
Nov 26, 1-4 p.m., Room 180 Doe
Nov. ​30, ​6-9 p.m.​ ​(Thank​ ​Goodness​ ​We​ ​Did​ ​It​ ​Party!),​ ​Room​ ​180​ ​Doe

Sign up at NaNoWriMo.org, and join the East Bay Home Region to see the calendar of events in our area and beyond.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact Shannon Monroe at least two weeks prior to the event at smonroe@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6151.

Hands-On 10: Building on the Built: Artists’ Books on Architecture

House book

Artists’ books defy conventional “reading” and involve the viewer through sight, touch, and physical manipulation. These books are too often locked behind exhibit cases, but the Environmental Design Library will have 20 books related to architecture on hand for you to touch, turn pages, and experience.

Friday, October 27 from 4-6 PM
Environmental Design Library Atrium
210 Wurster Hall

Wine and light refreshments will be served. Hosted by David Eifler, Jennifer Osgood, Molly Rose and Lauri Twitchell. See the libguide for more information.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor, David Eifler, at 510-643-7422 or deifler@berkeley.edu two weeks prior to the event.

Summer reading: Hillbilly Elegy

Hillbilly Elegy

Hillbilly Elegy
J.D. Vance
New York: Harper, 2016

Hillbilly Elegy is a memoir of JD Vance growing up in Middletown, Ohio—a town that has been through its share of economic transformations. After World War II, Middletown was a booming factory town with a thriving downtown, attracting residents from Kentucky’s Hill Country seeking a better life from the coal mines of Appalachia. By the time Vance was born, the factory had closed along with many downtown stores, leaving its residents in a state of poverty and social isolation. Hillbilly Elegy is the story of one family’s journey through the boom and bust cycles of Middletown. Along the way, it provides some insights into the way residents of Rust Belt towns (or at least one family) think about politics, work, education, and community and why many of them bought into the promises of Donald Trump in 2016.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Survival by Design: A Panel Discussion on Natural Restoration, Vernacular Architecture, and Ecocities

 

Three books for the ENVI book talkTuesday, October 24, 7-8:30pm
210 Wurster Hall

Hurricanes, earthquakes, extreme heat and climate change necessitate positive visions. Three thinkers will discuss their work in environmental design, architecture and urban planning.

Mark Rauzon is the author of Isles of Amnesia: The History, Geography, and Restoration of America’s Forgotten Pacific Islands and Isles of Refuge. As a biologist he has worked in the field of island restoration, traveling throughout the American Insular Pacific. He will talk about the latest novel habitats he’s designing for cormorants on the new Bay Bridge and Bay Area support for wild birds.

Randolph Langenbach authored Don’t Tear It Down! Preserving the Earthquake Resistant Vernacular Architecture of Kashmir in 2005. This book makes the case for preserving earthquake resistant traditional architecture. He will elaborate the benefits and importance of wood construction: techniques for safety and esthetic harmony.

Richard Register is author of Ecocity Berkeley, Ecocities: Rebuilding Cities in Balance with Nature, and World Rescue: An Economics Built on What We Build. He explores how cities and regions might be designed for harmony with nature. His work is currently on display the Environmental Design Library exhibition cases.

In conjunction with the Ecocity Berkeley Exhibit (on display until December 15th).

Summer reading: Dark Matters

Dark Matters

Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness
Simone Browne
Durham: Duke University Press, 2015

Dark Matters is a fascinating book that deals with the way modern surveillance practices–ranging from CCTVs to facial recognition programming to airport security–have been formed through racial biases and the policing of Black life. Rooted in historical methods of surveillance and connecting to modern manifestations, it deals with the consequences of racially-motivated surveillance. It’s a really interesting and interdisciplinary combination of social theory, history, technology, and even pop culture.

I found out about this book as part of a connector course, Data and Ethics, taken along with Data 8, Foundations of Data Science. As data collection and surveillance practices have become intensely enmeshed into our daily lives, this is an important text to consider. Dark Matters is really compelling in how it situates technology in the scope of current, and historical, social and racial issues in modern America.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

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