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ACS and RSC to require ORCIDs

orcid-logo

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) recently signed the ORCID Open Letter. For published articles the two societies will now require ORCIDs (Open Researcher and Contributor IDs) for corresponding authors and will automatically collect and display the ORCIDs of all submitting authors. The RSC announcement states that coordination between the publishers, Crossref and ORCID will ensure that published works are properly attributed.

In adopting the ORCID system RSC and ACS join a number of other publishers and journals including eLife, the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), the American Geophysical Union (AGU), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Science journals, Wiley, and Wellcome Open Research.

ChemSearch Challenge 2016

The Elsevier-Reaxys ChemSearch Challenge is a chemistry search competition. A new challenge consisting of four or five questions will be posted every week for 8 consecutive weeks, and players compete on the speed with which they can submit correct answers.

Players can compete as individuals or groups, and a $200 donation will be made on behalf of each week’s winner to their choice of Doctors Without Borders, World Wildlife Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council, Partners in Health, or Oxfam International. In order to compete, an account is required.

The first challenge was posted on October 17, and subsequent challenges will be posted every Monday at 12 pm GMT.

For more information, please see:

RSC Historical Collection

rsc historical collection bookshelf

The Royal Society of Chemistry Historical Collection covers nearly 500 years of the development and evolution of the chemical sciences. Books, journals, letters, lecture notes, pamphlets, monographs, plus minutes and publications from learned societies are included. Some highlights of the collection:

  • materials on alchemy and early chemistry dating back to the early 16th century
  • materials on explosives and firearms dating back to 1598
  • materials formerly in the possession of the family of Sir Humphry Davy and containing items from Antoine Lavoisier, John Dalton and Justus von Liebig, among others
  • backfiles of the journal Education in Chemistry

To access the RSC Historical Collection, go to Historical books and papers or Society publications and minutes.

Publish in RSC journals for free

RSC Gold for Gold

The UC Berkeley Library is partnering with the Royal Society of Chemistry to support free Open Access publishing under the RSC’s Gold for Gold initiative.

But you must act soon: the Gold for Gold program will only continue until March 2017.

The program offers voucher codes that enable Berkeley researchers to publish their papers in Royal Society of Chemistry journals free of charge, as Gold Open Access (OA) articles, without paying the normal article publication fee (between £1000 and £2500).

You are eligible if:

  • You are a UC Berkeley affiliate (faculty, staff, or student)
  • Your article is new and has been accepted for publication by RSC (i.e., vouchers cannot be used for articles that have already been published) and
  • You have not previously received a Gold for Gold voucher from the UC Berkeley Library in 2016

The application form is available at http://goo.gl/GAUwr, and as noted above, vouchers must be used by March 2017.

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith, Interim Chemistry Librarian, at esmith [at] library.berkeley.edu

NCBI bioinformatics tools: An introduction

NCBI-Logo_sm

A hands-on workshop introducing NCBI bioinformatics tools such as PubMed, Gene, Protein, Nucleotide, and BLAST:

  • Starting with a disease, syndrome, or process, identify the genes/proteins involved
  • Starting with an organism and a protein, find the protein sequence and gene coding region
  • Starting with a sequence, identify the gene/protein and source

The workshop will cover selecting the proper tools for your question, navigating through the interlinked NCBI databases, and saving your results.

  • Date: Wednesday, Sept. 7
  • Time: 12 – 1 pm
  • Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2189 VLSB (inside the library)

Add this workshop to my bCal

Open to all interested students and researchers; no registration is required.

Questions? Contact esmith@library.berkeley.edu

New bioscience journals

The Life and Health Sciences Division of the UC Berkeley Library has recently purchased access to the following subscription resources:

  • Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine and its associated Subject Collections offer review articles on the molecular and cellular bases of disease, translational medicine, and emerging therapeutic strategies. With the addition of CSH Perspectives in Medicine, UC Berkeley researchers now have access to all of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press journals.
  • Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology provides protocols for the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells.
  • Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE): Developmental Biology offers video articles on research methodologies in the field of developmental biology in vitro and in vivo at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and whole organism levels.
  • Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews (WIREs):
    • WIREs Developmental Biology is published in association with the Society for Developmental Biology and covers topics in cell and molecular biology, stem cell biology, plant biology, evolutionary biology, anatomy, physiology, and neuroscience.
    • WIREs RNA offers review articles on topics related to RNA, including structure and dynamics, evolution and genomics, interactions with proteins and other molecules, translation, processing, disease and development, and methods.
    • WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine covers topics in medicine, biology, physiology, computational biology and modeling, and bioengineering.

For more information, please contact bios@library.berkeley.edu.

New bioscience journals

The Life and Health Sciences Division of the UC Berkeley Library has recently purchased access to the following subscription resources:

  • Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine and its associated Subject Collections offer review articles on the molecular and cellular bases of disease, translational medicine, and emerging therapeutic strategies. With the addition of CSH Perspectives in Medicine, UC Berkeley researchers now have access to all of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press journals.
  • Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology provides protocols for the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells.
  • Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE): Developmental Biology offers video articles on research methodologies in the field of developmental biology in vitro and in vivo at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and whole organism levels.
  • Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews (WIREs):
    • WIREs Developmental Biology is published in association with the Society for Developmental Biology and covers topics in cell and molecular biology, stem cell biology, plant biology, evolutionary biology, anatomy, physiology, and neuroscience.
    • WIREs RNA offers review articles on topics related to RNA, including structure and dynamics, evolution and genomics, interactions with proteins and other molecules, translation, processing, disease and development, and methods.
    • WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine covers topics in medicine, biology, physiology, computational biology and modeling, and bioengineering.

For more information, please contact bios@library.berkeley.edu.

Open Genomic Data Repositories & Analysis Resources workshop

This workshop will introduce you to the rich ecosystem of genomic data repositories and analysis tools available for discovery and utilization of open genomic data.  We will focus on a handful of bioinformatics tools that are accessible to researchers without programming expertise. We will also review current publisher and funder data sharing policies to understand “open data” as it relates to genomic research.

We will spend the last 45 minutes of the workshop on a hands-on gene expression reanalysis use case that shows you how to:

  • Search the Gene Expression Omnibus for datasets of interest
  • Use GEO2R to analyze gene expression data and generate a list of differentially expressed genes
  • Use pathway and network tools to interpret that gene list in a biological context

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Time: 12 – 1:30 pm; this is a hands-on workshop, so please bring your own laptop

Location: D-Lab Conference Room, 371 Barrows Hall

Please register: http://dlab.berkeley.edu/register?field_training_uid=25457

(Space is limited, and registered and waitlisted attendees will have priority.)

Presenter: Dr. Megan Laurance is the Research Informationist at the UCSF Library where she uses her expertise in genomic data analysis and knowledge management to help researchers get up to speed on various bioinformatics methods, databases and software, and integrate those tools into their own data analysis and interpretation workflows.  Prior to becoming the Research Informationist at UCSF in 2013, Dr. Laurance spent 12 years at a genomic software and database company, and spent 10 years at the bench as a researcher studying various topics including transplantation biology, transcription, and cancer.

Questions? Please contact bios@library.berkeley.edu

Open Genomic Data Repositories & Analysis Resources workshop

This workshop will introduce you to the rich ecosystem of genomic data repositories and analysis tools available for discovery and utilization of open genomic data. We will focus on a handful of bioinformatics tools that are accessible to researchers without programming expertise. We will also review current publisher and funder data sharing policies to understand “open data” as it relates to genomic research.

We will spend the last 45 minutes of the workshop on a hands-on gene expression reanalysis use case that shows you how to:

  • Search the Gene Expression Omnibus for datasets of interest
  • Use GEO2R to analyze gene expression data and generate a list of differentially expressed genes
  • Use pathway and network tools to interpret that gene list in a biological context

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Time: 12 – 1:30 pm; this is a hands-on workshop, so please bring your own laptop

Location: D-Lab Conference Room, 371 Barrows Hall

Please register: http://dlab.berkeley.edu/register?field_training_uid=25457

(Space is limited, and registered and waitlisted attendees will have priority.)

Presenter: Dr. Megan Laurance is the Research Informationist at the UCSF Library where she uses her expertise in genomic data analysis and knowledge management to help researchers get up to speed on various bioinformatics methods, databases and software, and integrate those tools into their own data analysis and interpretation workflows. Prior to becoming the Research Informationist at UCSF in 2013, Dr. Laurance spent 12 years at a genomic software and database company, and spent 10 years at the bench as a researcher studying various topics including transplantation biology, transcription, and cancer.

Questions? Please contact bios@library.berkeley.edu

NCBI Workshop: SRA and dbGaP

NCBI logo

On Wednesday, March 23 from 9 – 11 am PDT, NCBI staff will present a workshop for advanced users of SRA and dbGaP who are interested in using public datasets, and:

  • Use and move large genomic datasets,
  • Use cloud computing for analyzing genomic datasets,
  • Express an interest in doing parallel work on genomic datasets,
  • Or are well-versed in RNA-Seq, variant calling, or metagenomics.

The registration link lists the specific topics the workshop will cover. For a more general explanation of NCBI’s genomic resources, please visit NCBI Learn for webinars and factsheets pertaining to dbGaP, SRA, and more.

Reposted from NCBI News.

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