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SF 2018 Antiquarian Book, Print & Paper Fair

Libraries are not the only places in the Bay Area where print culture is alive and well. This exciting fair at the South San Francisco Conference Center next Friday and Saturday features more than 120 exhibitors of books, maps, photographs, posters, and other print ephemera. For details, see: sfbookandpaperfair.com.

San Francisco 2018 Antiquarian, Book Print & Paper Fair

La règle du jour

Next week’s screenings (January 14 and 19) of French filmmaker Jean Renoir’s masterpiece The Rules of the Game (La règle du jeu) at BAMPFA provide a rare opportunity to enjoy the 35mm print of this film on the big screen in its state of the art facilities. The screenings of the 1939 film, regarded by many as one of the best films ever made, also provide an opportunity to inform you of library resources like Kanopy – an on-demand streaming video service which provides access to more than 26,000 films – allowing the UCB community to watch movies on anywhere in lieu of the viewing stations in Moffitt Library’s Media Resources Center. An online database of BAMPFA’s extensive collection of film documentation called CineFiles makes it easy to pull up reviews and other information on major filmmakers. Article databases such as FIAF, Film and Television Literature Index, and the MLA International Bibliography can help you locate scholarly articles on Jean Renoir and other figures of world cinema. For readers of French, Cairn.info – an online collection of more than 400 French and Belgian journals – is a quick way to retrieve full-text articles instantly. And lastly, if you’re just looking for good old-fashioned paper books, the Library has more than 183 of those in OskiCat on Jean Renoir alone.

Catalan Futurist Manifesto digitized

Manifest Català

From the early 20th century until the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Spain witnessed a flourishing of literary and artistic forms (painting, poetry, prose and film) on par with the experimentialism taking place across Europe and Latin America. According to Jennifer Duprey in Avant-Garde Cultural Practices in Spain (1914-1936), self-taught poet and radical journalist Joan Salvat-Papasseit found inspiration in both the formalist attributes articulated in F.T. Marinetti’s Manifesto del futurismo (1909) and in the social terms of compatriot Gabriel Alomar’s El futurisme (1905). “He was the only Catalan writer that had the conscience of the revolutionary character that the Futurist movement had from a social point of view, yet sustained that his particular point of view was a dialectical concept of tradition,” explains Duprey.

Last fall the UC Berkeley Library became one of three libraries outside of Spain to own an original broadside of Contra els poetes amb minúscula: primer manifest català futurista (Against lowercase poets: the first Futurist manifesto) published in 1920 and is now the first institution in the world to have digitized it. Salvat-Papasseit’s famous collection of poems L’irradiador del port, i les gavines (1921), now housed in The Bancroft Library, was featured in the exhibition No Legacy || Literatura Electrónica installed in Doe Library’s Brown Gallery last year.

L'irradiador del port, i les gavines / J. Salvat-Papasseit.

L’irradiador del port, i les gavines (Barcelona: Atenes A.G., 1921)

Year 4 of funding for materials in less commonly taught European languages

LCTLs

Three years ago, the Institute of European Studies established a special fund to support the UC Berkeley Library in acquiring scholarly resources in or about less commonly taught European languages (LCTLs). Students, both undergraduate and graduate, lecturers and faculty who wish to use library materials (books, ebooks, graphic novels, dissertations, DVDs, etc.) in a European LCTL and published in Europe that are currently not available on the Berkeley campus, are encouraged to fill out the Library Recommendation Form and mention “IES LCTL Support” in the Comments section.

This support only applies to LCTLs that are still spoken today in Western, Northern, or Southern Europe (i.e. all European languages with the exception of German, French, Italian and Spanish); no support will be given for classical or extinct languages nor for Slavic and other Eastern European languages supported by the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

A few examples of titles acquired last year include:

Barcino by Maria Carme Roca.

Chrēstiko lexiko tēs neoellēnikēs glōssas / syntaxē-epimeleia by Christophoros G. Charalampakēs ; vasikoi synergates Stauroula Zapheirē [and 7 others].

Description de l’occitan parlé à Sénaillac-Lauzès (Lot) et dans les communes voisines by Jean Sibille

La langue d’oc telle qu’on la parle: atlas linguistique de la Provence by Jean-Claude Bouvier, Claude Martel cartographie et mise en page par Guylaine Brun-Trigaud.

Lexiko tōn dyskoliōn kai tōn lathōn stē chrēsē tēs Hellēnikēs: glōssikos symvoulos: gia na miloume kai na graphoume sōsta Hellēnika by Geōrgiou D. Bampiniōtē

El nen que volia matar by Lolita Bosch

Ramon Llull essencial: retrar d’un pare d’Europa by Pere Villalba

La societat valenciana en l’espill lingüístic : què diuen les llengües quan parlen de nosaltres? by Juli Martínez Amorós

The Syntax of old Romanian edited by Gabriela Pană Dindelegan; consultant editor, Martin Maiden

Taal en identiteit in de Rand: een analyse van de taalsituatie in de Rand rond Brussel op basis van de Brio-taalbarometer by Rudi Janssens

Thermē kai phōs: aphierōmatikos tomos stē mnēmē tou A.-Ph. Christidē = Licht und wärme : in memory of A.F. Christidis / epistemonikē epimeleia Maria Theodōropoulou

Tragèdies silenciades : repressió franquista i maquis a les comarques del nord del País Valencià by Raül González Devís

La visita by Enric Virgili

Van mij valt niks te leren by Peter Buwalda

Vic-Bilh: une langue, un pays: ethnolinguistique du Vic-Bilh by Jan Bonnemason

Vrouwen van de wereld by Tommy Wieringa

Waarom iedereen altijd gelijk heeft by Ruben Mersch

 

 

 

Qu’est-ce que l’accès ouvert?

Qu’est-ce que l’accès ouvert?

In recognition of Open Access Week 2017, here’s a link to the French translation of Peter Suber’s important summary of the open-access movement published in 2012. The English edition is openly available too of course.

La rentrée littéraire

September is the month when an unusually high concentration of new publications are released to the European market, notably in France and Belgium. While it may take a few more weeks for these books to reach us in Berkeley and get cataloged, some are already making their way to the shelves. Remember, all new books destined for the Main Stacks are first displayed on the third floor of the Moffitt Library and also listed on the recent acquisitions lists for French, Italian and Iberian studies in OskiCat for your convenience. Enjoy!

Resources from the Center for Research Libraries

CRL resources
A political pamphlet from the People’s Republic of China, 1949; Illinois Public Records Project, 1942; Bosnian nationalist newspaper, Zagreb, 1995.

The UC Berkeley Library is a member of the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), a partnership of more than 200 university, college, and independent research libraries. CRL acquires and preserves newspapers, journals, government documents, archives, and other primary source materials from a global network of sources, making them available to researchers through interlibrary loan and digital delivery.

CRL’s deep and diverse holdings support research in the history of science, economics, law and government, immigration and population studies, international diplomacy, and cultural studies.

  • Largest collection of circulating newspapers in North America (more than 16,000 titles with strengths in various global areas and historical U.S. ethnic titles)
  • Primary legal and government resources, including foreign and U.S. state documents
  • Over 800,00 foreign dissertations (mostly from European institutions) dating back to the 1800s
  • Area studies materials—major microform and paper collections from Africa, Latin America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia

CRL functions as a branch library of extraordinary resources with user-focused services.

  • Rapid turnaround of loan requests and project-length loan privileges from CRL’s five million items
  • Digitized collections offering over 50 million pages scanned by request or in partnerships
  • Document delivery of articles from the Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering, and Technology
  • Demand purchase of new materials in three areas of collection strength: foreign dissertations, newspapers, and microform archives

For more information on CRL collections: CRL’s online catalog (holdings are also listed in WorldCat and in some cases in OskiCat)

Center for Research Libraries - Global Resources Network

For more information about the CRL: please contact  Liladhar R. Pendse
(Lpendse (at) library.berkeley.edu), UCB Library coordinator for the CRL.

New blog for International & Area Studies

world map

Today, we are launching a new library blog devoted to international & area studies resources in the Library in an effort to raise awareness of newly acquired materials, tools, services and upcoming events. We hope you will consider subscribing.

To find a specialized librarian for every region of the world, please check the subject librarian directory.

New e-resources for the Romance Languages

Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism

Digital resources are regularly added to the Library’s holdings. Here are some noteworthy ones acquired in and/or related to the Romance languages this past year:

Beckett Digital Manuscript Project – Digitized collection of Irish author Samuel Beckett’s original manuscripts, as well as a digitized collection of his personal library with his annotations.

BiGLI Online – Online version of the fundamental print bibliography and discovery tool for Italian language and literature. Includes texts, critical and historical surveys, philogical and linguistic notes, essays, monographs, bibliographic reviews, etc. (1981-present).

Brill’s Medieval Reference Library (MRLO) – Contains over 4,000 entries and 200 plus illustrations covering pre-modern European history and culture. The database includes complete coverage of four medieval studies encyclopedias: Encyclopedia of Medieval Chronicle, Encyclopedia of Medieval Dress and Textiles of the British Isles c. 450-1450, Encyclopedia of Medieval Pilgrimage, and Brill’s Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages. Searches can be performed across encyclopedias or limited to one title.Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959-

Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959-  Primary-source collection of ca. 45,000 fully-searchable documents from the Casa de las Américas in Havana, documenting the culture and cultural relations of Revolutionary Cuba and countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Includes articles, newspaper clippings, cable messages, interviews, conference memorabilia, etc. This collection is Part 1: Casa y Cultura” of the so-called Archivo Vertical held in the library of the Casa de las Américas. (Brill) [1959 to present]

Encyclopedia of Semiotics – Encyclopedia and guide to concepts in semiotics, sign theory, and cultural studies such as theories, theorists, schools of thought, issues in communications, cognition, and cultural theory. (Oxford University Press)

International Directory of Medievalists – A directory listing names and addresses of approximately 15,000 medievalists and scholars in fields relating to the Middle Ages in 70 countries. This online title continues the print edition.

Italian Reformation Online – Collection of primary texts from the Italian Reformation digitized from the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze. Selection of more than 100 rare works offers a synopsis and theological profile of the diversity of the printed manifestations of the Protestant Reformation in the Italian states. (Brill) [15th-17th centuries]

Latin American Anarchist and Labour Periodicals Online – This collection contains the periodicals that have been accumulated by the Austrian anarchist, historian and collector Max Nettlau (1865-1944), together with a number of later additions, held at the International Institute of Social History (IISH) in Amsterdam. The collection of 971 titles provides a richness of documentation pertaining explicitly to the formative anarchist and anarcho-syndicalist episode in the history of Latin American labor movements. The collection contains numerous rare, and in many cases, unique titles that are also discoverable individually through OskiCat. Included, among many others, are the Argentine periodicals La Protesta, La Vanguardia and Acción Obrera; the Brazilian O Exempio, Jornal do Povo and Battaglia; the Chilean Voz del Mar; and the Mexican Ariete, Redención Obrera, Revolución Social and El Sindicalista. (Brill) [1890-1920]

Routledge Encylopedia of Modernism – The REM is a cross-disciplinary resource for students and researchers covering several subject areas: literature, architecture, visual arts, music, dance, theatre, film and intellectual currents. Over 1,000 articles and over 100 images are included. Browsing by subject, movement and place is available to find information across fields and topics.

All new databases are listed on the Library’s A-Z Databases page.

The hidden treasures in Italian Libraries

The ceiling in the reading room of the Biblioteca Vallicelliana in Rome.
The ceiling in the reading room of the Biblioteca Vallicelliana in Rome. Photo by Susan Wright for The New York Times

David Laskin’s article in yesterday’s New York Times gave a delectable overview of some of Italy’s historical libraries as not only keepers of intellectual treasures but as physical spaces to carry out research. While web portals such as Europeana or Internet Culturale are bringing us closer to Europe’s rare books and primary resources, conducting archival research in renaissance libraries such as the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in Venice, the Biblioteca Vallicelliana in Rome, or the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana designed by Michelangelo in Florence will never be completely replicated online.

UC Berkeley may not have paintings by Titian or Veronese decorating its reading rooms, but it is home to one of the most significant Italian collections on the West Coast with medieval manuscripts, incunabula, and early modern works in The Bancroft Library, and an extraordinary collection of 19th and 20th century Italian books and journal runs in the Main Stacks. The Library collects in all divisions of Italian history and literature, from the medieval and renaissance periods to the present. For the 20th and 21st centuries, the collection tends to focus more heavily on new literature(s), literary and cultural theory, cinema, historiography, Italian colonial presence in Africa, national and regional identity politics, and comparative studies with other Romance traditions. The Art History/Classics Library in Doe, the Hargrove Music Library, and the Environmental Design Library are all places on campus where the Italian collection continues to thrive.

Biblioteca Marciana
Biblioteca Marciana in Venice. Photo by Claude Potts

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