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The Russian Revolution Centenary: 1917-2017: Politics, Propaganda and People’s Art

Artist: El Lissitzsky [Lazar Markovich Lisitskii (1890-1941). The poster was created in 1920 in VitebskThis exhibition, curated by Liladhar Pendse (East European, Eurasian and Latin American Studies Librarian), is dedicated to the centenary of the Russian Revolution that took place in October of 1917. The exhibition will take place in the Moffitt Library, from September 11, 2017 through January 8, 2018 and it will highlight several print-items from the revolutionary times.

Attendance restrictions: Access to the Moffitt Undergraduate Library is restricted and you’ll need the UC Berkeley/ Cal Card for entry.

The virtual counterpart of the exhibition is located here:  http://exhibits.lib.berkeley.edu/spotlight/russian-revolution

Book Talk – Professor Jabari Mahiri on Deconstructing Race

Thursday, September 14, 2017 | 5:00pm – 6:30pm

Social Research Library (227 Haviland Hall)

book cover

Deconstructing Race: Multicultural Education Beyond the Color-Bind

In his new book, Deconstructing Race: Multicultural Education Beyond the Color-Blind (Teachers College Press, 2017), Professor Jabari Mahiri of UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education, explores contemporary and historical scholarship on race, the emergence of multiculturalism, and the rise of the digital age. Professor Mahiri examines evolving, highly distinctive micro-cultural identities and affinities, and provides an educational framework for understanding the diversity of individuals and groups.

Books will be available for sale or can be purchased ahead of time (with a 20% discount) on the Teachers College Press website.

Sponsored by: Berkeley Library (Social Sciences Division), Bay Area Writing Project, National Writing Project.

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact the event sponsor, Margaret Phillips (margaret.phillips@berkeley.edu) as soon as possible.

Welcoming Adam Clemons

Adam in the field

Adam in Saint-Louis, Senegal during his time as a Library Fellow at the West Africa Research Center in Dakar, Senegal.

Adam Clemons joins the UC Berkeley Library community as the Librarian for African Studies and African American Studies. Adam comes to Berkeley from the University of Tennessee at Martin’s Paul Meek Library where he was the Interim Manager of User Services, Information Literacy Coordinator, and Instruction Librarian. As a public service-oriented librarian, Adam is working on building strong relationships with faculty and students at UC Berkeley’s Center for African Studies and the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies. He also has collection development responsibilities related to these subject areas and will actively participate in the Library’s reference, outreach, and instructional services. He has a Master of Library Science degree from the School of Informatics and Computing and a Master of Arts in African Studies degree from the Graduate School, African Studies Program both at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Welcoming Josh Quan

The newest member of the Social Sciences Division is Josh Quan, Data Services Librarian. Josh comes to Berkeley from Tufts University where he played a leading role in establishing and developing their Data Lab and served as a liaison to several social science departments. In his new role at Berkeley, Josh will develop, lead, and assess outreach and services to increase data and statistical literacy within the Library and across the curriculum. He has a BA in Psychology from UC Santa Cruz and a MSIS in Information Science from State University of New York, Albany.

Major Donation of Mesoamericana from Prof. John Graham

John Graham, professor of Anthropology at Berkeley since 1962, donated his extensive collection of 4,000 volumes on Mesoamerican culture and history (particularly Maya and Olmec archaeology and art and Maya epigraphy) to the Anthropology Library.

Image of John Graham.

John Graham at the ruins of Seibal (aka Ceibal) on the heights above the Rio Pasion in Guatemala, 1961. Photo courtesy of John Graham

Many of the volumes are rare — John Graham began collecting rare books as a twelve year old growing up in the border region of Texas — and the collection was independently appraised at $68,000. We are truly grateful that Professor Graham entrusted “his children” to us!

Social Sciences librarians visit the Hearst Museum

Courtesy of Phoebe A. Hearst Anthropology Museum

Phoebe A. Hearst Anthropology Museum (storage vault)

As a staff bonding experience, we could have gone bowling or had an ice cream social or seen a matinee of Wonder Woman. But the staff of the Social Sciences libraries have a curious affinity for cultural institutions. We chose to visit the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology instead. Closed since 2012, the Hearst Museum recently reopened with a new conference room and remodeled gallery space. Museum curators gave us a behind-the scenes tour of their vault, where we viewed just a few items from this collection of some 3.8 million objects. Among the highlights were personal adornments worn by the Maidu Indians of Butte County, Etruscan goblets, cuneiform tablets and Hopi-Tewa carved kachina.

Courtesy of Phoebe A. Hearst Anthropology Museum

Phoebe A. Hearst Anthropology Museum (storage vault)

The Hearst Museum was founded in 1901 and is a comprehensive anthropology museum supporting research in Archaeology, Art History, Classics, Egyptology and Folklore. It is located in Kroeber Hall (just below the Anthropology Library). For hours and directions see the Visit Hearst Museum page.

The Social Sciences Division highly recommends the current exhibit, People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World. This interactive exhibit explores everyday objects and asks the viewer to think about who made those objects … and why.

Special thanks to Hearst Museum of Anthropology staff Katie Fleming, Ira Jacknis, Jordan Jacobs and Linda Waterfield for making our visit possible.

Courtesy of Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Social Sciences Division staff, new patio at the Hearst Museum

Images Courtesy of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

June is Pride Month

SF Pride - June 24-25, 2017

#SFpride #summerOfLove50 #resist

Since 1970, Pride celebrates the resistance of the Stonewall Uprising of June 28,1969 and the struggle for human rights for all. Pride Month hasn’t been officially declared by the current president, but fortunately that won’t stop the celebration, or the resistance. If you’re looking for a good GLBTQIA movie or documentary — to learn, laugh or cry — Kanopy has almost 400 streaming videos on the diverse array of queer related themes, available to anyone on campus or to UCB via proxy or VPN. And of course we have lots of books, journals and databases as well!

Recent research in psychology: What does it mean to feel authentic in a relationship?

By rt69 on flickr.com (Queereaster) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

A recent study by Serena Chen and Muping Gan of the UC Berkeley Department of Psychology discusses the “relational self” — the notion that who we are often changes depending on who we are with. A person’s behavior changes, for instance, when they are with their parents, colleagues, friends or romantic partner. Gan and Chen examined levels of authenticity that individuals felt with regard to their relational selves. In other words, do you feel like yourself when you’re around your parents or your best friend? Does being your “authentic self” in a romantic relationship lead to a greater sense of well-being? Your “ideal self,” on the other hand, is that person you aspire to be, not necessarily who you really are. To oversimplify their study, it turns out being one’s “ideal self” in a relationship leads to greater well-being than being one’s “authentic self.”

Read the full story:

Celebrating their service: Susan Edwards and Brian Quigley win 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award

The toughest crowd to impress is often the one closest to you. Colleagues share many of the same challenges — competing projects, ambitions, and timelines among them. So when Berkeley librarians join to applaud one of their own, you know it means something.

This year’s winners of the Distinguished Librarian Award are Susan Edwards, head of the Social Sciences Division, and Brian Quigley, head of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Division. “I’ve been a librarian for a long time, and am passionate about what I do,” explains Edwards. “Being honored by my peers is incredibly moving.”

The Distinguished Librarian Award is given biennially to up to two librarians recognized for their excellence by a committee of peers and faculty. The awards are administered and funded by the Librarians Association of UC Berkeley.

BRIAN QUIGLEY
In 2013, Quigley led the integration of five separate engineering and physical science (EPS) libraries into the inaugural subject division. Through the creation of this and five other divisions, over 20 subject specialty libraries have been grouped into affinity groups.

By pulling together a highly distributed workforce into larger communities, this reorganization has enhanced staff collaboration and efficiency, and has supported the streamlining and sharing of services among libraries.

A few of Quigley’s other achievements include better serving user needs by thoroughly assessing and restructuring EPS reference services, and by forming an EPS faculty library committee and a student committee to provide input on the library’s programs, outreach and acquisitions.

For Quigley, working with people is key. He derives the most satisfaction from mentoring staff, consulting with students and faculty, and collaborating with his colleagues. “When faced with difficult decisions, the staff and I often ask ‘What would Brian do?’,” explains engineering librarian Lisa Ngo.

Brian Quigley, winner of the 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

Quigley manages the Kresge Engineering, Chemistry, Mathematics Statistics, Earth Sciences and Map, and Physics-Astronomy libraries. These serve roughly 500 faculty, 2800 graduate students, and 5000 undergraduate students in the relevant fields. Quigley is thought of as an experimenter. He frequently tries out new offerings and services based on the ideas and observations of his staff and library clients. “What we find effective is to pilot things,” he says, “and then use feedback to refine ideas and better address user needs.”

Recent pilot programs with broad student impact include joining the popular Packd app, which provides students with a real-time look at seat availability; providing an ASUC-funded REST Zone; extending the Engineering Library hours; improving student services, such as offering presentation kits for checkout, laptop lending, and more moveable whiteboards for group study; and encouraging staff in initiating their popular Maps and More series at the Earth Sciences and Map Library.

“Campus itself is such a stimulating and exciting environment,” explains Quigley. “The quality of the faculty and the caliber of the students are so inspiring. It always makes me want to be a better librarian and to serve them better.”

SUSAN EDWARDS
Susan Edwards loves the library profession because it offers “the chance to help people, together with lots of intellectual stimulation and reward.”

As division head for social sciences, she provides leadership for five libraries — Anthropology, Business, Education Psychology, Environmental Design, and Social Research. She also manages the Data Lab.

“All the social sciences disciplines are looking at how to use research to effect social change, to improve people’s lives,” explains Edwards “Information and social justice really belong together, because information is key for individuals and groups who want to change their lives.”

Susan Edwards, winner of the 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award. (Photography by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

Susan Edwards, winner of the 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

The most satisfying aspect of her work, she says, is working closely with students, faculty, and independent researchers. “I love helping them think through the process, and seeing their excitement when they get the information they need,” Edwards says.

After earning her M.L.I.S. at Berkeley in 1980, Edwards worked at the University Library for seven years as head of newspapers and microforms. She then went east and assumed a series of positions at the Amherst College Library.

Returning to Berkeley in 2009, Edwards was surprised at the relatively low level of entitlement among many Cal students. “It’s more about creating an environment where we’re teaching students that they can expect more support,” she explained. “Yes, they do deserve an hourlong appointment to get help with their research!”

She adds, “I love being at a public research university that’s committed to diversity and equity. We represent a pathway to mobility for many of our students, and their commitment to service inspires me. I feel lucky to be here.”

One of Edwards’ recent achievements was the process of combining three different libraries’ collections — Education, Psychology, and Social Welfare — into the Social Research Library. To help pare down and combine the materials, Edwards studied dissertation citations and noted the types of resources the three units’ students were using most. Faculty and students served by the new Social Research Library consider the transition a real success.

To build intellectual community, Edwards has launched a series of popular book talks at the library that draw faculty, students, alumni and community members. The gatherings are reinvigorating the Social Research Library as a center of learning and interaction.

“This is such an exciting time to be a librarian at Berkeley,” Edwards reflects. “Because of the far easier access to information through technology, a library’s traditional roles are now only one part of the suite of services needed. So we are rethinking the role of the library more broadly, and how it affects the life of scholarship and discovery on campus.”

Reflecting on Susan’s many contributions to the academic vitality at Berkeley, psychology professor Stephen Hinshaw noted her creativity and leadership. “Indeed, I wasn’t prepared for what a librarian in the UC system could do!”

Author Arlie Hochschild to discuss her insight into the political right on Nov. 30

Arlie Russell Hochschild, UC Berkeley Professor of Sociology

“What, I ask, do members of the Tea Party–or anyone else–want to feel about the nation and its leaders? I trace this desire to what I call their “deep story”–a feels-as-if story of their difficult struggle for the American Dream,” explains Arlie Russell Hochschild.

Social Science Matrix and the Education Psychology Library are pleased to welcome Arlie Russell Hochschild, UC Berkeley Professor Emerita of Sociology, for a discussion about her new book, Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right (The New Press, September 2016), a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award.

Hochschild is one of the most influential sociologists of her generation. She is the author of nine books, including The Second Shift, The Time Bind, The Managed Heart, and The Outsourced Self. Three of her books have been named as New York Times Notable Books of the Year and her work appears in sixteen languages. She was the winner of the Ulysses Medal as well as Guggenheim and Mellon grants.

In Strangers in Their Own Land, Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, deep into Louisiana bayou country—a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground with the people she meets—among them a Tea Party activist whose town has been swallowed by a sinkhole caused by a drilling accident—people whose concerns are ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children.

Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that many on the political right have been duped into voting against their interests. In the right-wing world she explores, Hochschild discovers powerful forces—fear of cultural eclipse, economic decline, perceived government betrayal—that override self-interest, as progressives see it, and help explain the emotional appeal of a candidate like Donald Trump. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in “red” America. Along the way she finds answers to one of the crucial questions of contemporary American politics: why do the people who would seem to benefit most from “liberal” government intervention abhor the very idea?

“Conducted over the last five years and focusing on emotions, I try to scale an ‘empathy wall’ to learn how to see, think, and feel as they do,” Hochschild explains on her website. “What, I ask, do members of the Tea Party–or anyone else–want to feel about the nation and its leaders? I trace this desire to what I call their “deep story”–a feels-as-if story of their difficult struggle for the American Dream. Hidden beneath the right-wing hostility to almost all government intervention, I argue, lies an anguishing loss of honor, alienation, and engagement in a hidden social class war.”

Please join us on November 30 for a conversation with Professor Hochschild, moderated by Lynsay Skiba, Associate Director for Programs at Social Science Matrix. A reception will follow the discussion. Copies of the book will be available for sale, courtesy of Mrs. Dalloway’s Bookstore.

This event is co-sponsored by Social Science Matrix and the UC Berkeley Education Psychology Library.

Details
Wednesday, November 30
2:30-4 p.m.
Social Science Matrix
820 Barrows Hall

Matrix is located on the 8th floor of Barrows Hall. There are entrances at both ends of the building, but only one of the elevators on the eastern side goes directly to the 8th floor. You can alternatively take the stairs to the 7th floor and walk up the stairs.

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