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Maps & More: Hamilton!

Please mark your calendars for the first Maps and More pop-up exhibit of the semester!
Friday, September 22, 11 am – noon
Earth Sciences & Map Library, 50 McCone Hall
Hamilton, in Maps informational poster

You’ve listened to the musical, now put some names to places with maps related to Alexander Hamilton’s life and exploits. This month’s Maps and More collections show-and-tell event is offered in coordination with the On the Same Page program. Featuring maps and atlases from the Earth Sciences & Map Library collection, this exhibit helps put some geographic context to key events in Hamilton, from his birth in the West Indies to his years in Philadelphia and New York and his deadly duel on the banks of the Hudson.

 
We’re delighted to have history graduate student Nicole Viglini guest curating this pop-up exhibit. Nicole’s research interests include themes of race, culture, class, and gender in early and nineteenth-century America and the Caribbean.
 
We hope to see you there!
Susan Powell
Sam Teplitzky
 
ps: Save the date for next month’s Maps and More on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 11 am – noon with mapmaker Stace Wright of Eureka Cartography!

Data Practices and Publishing Workshop Series

On Tuesday, September 5th and Tuesday, September 12th, the Kresge Engineering Library and Research Data Management will be holding a series of two data management workshops designed for researchers who are in the midst navigating the research data lifecycle.

research data lifecycle

https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/research-data-management

During the first workshop, Efficient Research Data Practices, we’ll tear apart the above cycle and identify where each attendee currently falls in the data lifecycle. We’ll address pitfalls, tips, and tools for each step of the process that includes creating data management plans; setting up secure storage for the active data management phase; and how to prepare your data for publication while adhering to publisher and funder requirements.

 

The second workshop, Data Sharing: Publishing and Archiving, will take a deep dive into metadata creation and preparing data for publication and archiving. We’ll discuss why data publication is so important and we’ll identify individual publisher requirements for datasets. Daniella Lowenberg, formerly a publication manager for PLoS, and now the Research Data Specialist for the California Digital Library will be joining us.

 

Please register for the workshops by clicking on the below links and we look forward to seeing you!

Efficient Research Data Practices: September 5, 4:00 – 5:00, Kresge Engineering Library – 110MD Bechtel Engineering Center

Data Sharing: Publishing and Archiving: September 12, 4:00 – 5:00, Kresge Engineering Library – 110MD Bechtel Engineering Center

Advanced PubMed workshop

PubMed logo

Want to make your searches for biomedical information more effective and efficient? The Library’s Life and Health Sciences Division is holding a hands-on workshop on advanced features of PubMed, including:

  • How to use filters to focus search results on specific article types, publication dates and more
  • How to add field tags to find articles by author, title, journal, and other criteria
  • How Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) can help you find additional relevant information
  • How to use My NCBI to save searches, set up alerts, and display results in your preferred format
  • How PubMed links to information in other NCBI resources

Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 VLSB
Date: Tuesday, September 5, repeated Wednesday, September 6
Time: 12 – 1 pm

No pre-registration is required; all are welcome.

Questions? Please contact Elliott Smith at esmith@library.berkeley.edu

For additional workshops on NCBI bioinformatics tools, citation managers, searching Scopus, writing and collaboration tools, data visualization, productivity tools and techniques, and other topics, please see the Science Libraries Events Calendar.

NCBI bioinformatics tools: An introduction

NCBI-Logo_sm

A hands-on workshop introducing NCBI bioinformatics tools such as PubMed, Gene, Protein, Nucleotide, and BLAST:

  • Starting with a disease, syndrome, or process, identify the genes/proteins involved
  • Starting with an organism and a protein, find the protein sequence and gene coding region
  • Starting with a sequence, identify the gene/protein and source

The workshop will cover selecting the proper tools for your question, navigating through the interlinked NCBI databases, and saving your results. It will be offered twice:

  • Dates: Tuesday August 29 (add to bCal) and Wednesday August 30 (add to bCal)
  • Time: 12 – 1 pm
  • Location: Bioscience Library Training Room, 2101 VLSB

Open to all interested students and researchers; no registration is required.

Questions? Contact esmith@library.berkeley.edu

For additional workshops on citation managers, searching PubMed and Scopus, writing and collaboration tools, data visualization, productivity tools and techniques, and other topics, please see the Science Libraries Events Calendar.

5 things you didn’t know about solar eclipses

Total solar eclipse (CC via Flickr)

It’s bird! It’s a plane! It’s — an eclipse?

On Monday, the moon will completely cover the sun and cast a shadow across the country, marking the first total solar eclipse visible in the United States since Feb. 26, 1979 — and the first one whose path has traveled from one American coast to the next in 99 years.

Although the forthcoming solar spectacle will be fully visible only from a 70-mile-wide, 3,000-mile-long band — “the path of totality” — which stretches from Oregon to South Carolina, you won’t have to travel far to get your eclipse fix.

Earth and physical sciences librarian Sam Teplitzky, who recently chose the items for a Cal Day eclipse extravaganza in the Physics Library and a Maps and More pop-up event at the Earth Sciences Library, says she has noticed a surge in interest in the topic.

“We’ve had several patrons use the eclipse-related maps to help chart their own eclipse-chasing plans,” she says, “and the new books I purchased related to next week’s eclipse have been checked out all summer.”

Those who can’t make it to the path of totality to witness the full-on phenomenon in person can check out the eclipse-centric displays here on campus. One, on view until Oct. 1, is outside of the Earth Sciences & Map Library (open weekdays from 9 to 5 p.m.), in the lower level of the lobby of McCone Hall. The other, which will be up through the end of the month, is at the main reading room of the Physics-Astronomy Library (open weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m.).

Eclipse exhibit
Eclipse resources are on display at the Earth Sciences & Map Library until Oct. 1. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)
Eclipse books on display
The main reading room of the Physics-Astronomy Library will feature eclipse materials through August. (Photo by Cade Johnson for the University Library)

Bonita Dyess, circulation supervisor at the Earth Sciences & Map Library, was instrumental in putting together the eclipse displays.

“I hope people gain a different outlook on our science libraries from looking at our displays,” she says. “I also hope they gain a better understanding of what a total eclipse truly is and how rare this extraordinary event occurs, especially in the U.S.”

We pored over many of the eclipse-related offerings at the Library, full of little-known tidbits and fun facts. Here are just a few things we learned.

1. Eclipse chasing is old.
Heading to Oregon in time for the big event? You’re not alone. Many eclipse enthusiasts are making their way the path of totality — from Boiler Bay in Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina — for primo viewing. But eclipse chasing isn’t new: It is said to have started in 1715. In fact, that year, Sir Isaac Newton created diagrams of the eclipse in England for the public, according to “Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them.”

Interested in the history of eclipse chasing? Rebecca Joslin’s “Chasing Eclipses: The Total Solar Eclipses of 1905, 1914, 1925” tackles the subject, and its beautiful imagery makes it one of librarian Teplitzky’s top eclipse-related picks at the Library.

2. Eclipses come with their own weather.
Like a neighborhood in San Francisco, eclipses are said to come with their own microclimates. Solar eclipses are associated with a drop in temperature — the moon is blocking the sun, after all. Tracking software, however, isn’t sophisticated enough to predict the the weather changes they trigger, according to “Total Solar Eclipses.”

But rapidly fluctuating weather? That’s something all of us in the Bay Area are used to.

3. According to legend, a dragon (or frog or vampire or werewolf or dog) ate the sun.
Eclipses have been explained throughout the years in legends and lore, which vary from culture to culture. The Chinese and Indonesians, for example, historically held that the eclipse is caused by a giant dragon eating the sun, accounting for its apparent disappearance. In fact, the Mandarin word for eclipse is “shi,” which means “eat.

Eclipse myths involving creatures eating the sun are not uncommon, although the beast ingesting the planets can vary depending on the stories’ origins. In Bolivia, it was a huge dog; in Vietnam, a ginormous frog; a werewolf in Serbia; and a vampire in Siberia, according to the fascinating tome “Total Eclipses: Science, Observations, Myths and Legends.”

4. Eclipses have appeared in many books throughout history — including maybe the Bible.
Eclipses are featured in some of the most highly regarded works in history, including those by Shakespeare (“King Lear”) and Mark Twain (“A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court”). Even one of the “Twilight” books is called “Eclipse.”

Most notably, though, is that the Scriptures may depict a solar eclipse. The Bible mentions three hours of darkness in the daytime during Jesus’ crucifixion, according to “Total Eclipses.” But whether this was a religious miracle or a normal (albeit rare) astronomical occurrence — or something else entirely — remains up for debate.

5. Someday, solar eclipses will no longer be visible.
The moon is drifting away from the Earth at a rate of 38 mm per year — which is the thickness of about five iPhones stacked on top of one another. Someday, the moon will appear so small in the sky, it will be unable to obscure the sun, according to “Total Solar Eclipses.”

But don’t worry, chasers — it won’t happen anytime soon.

How to see the eclipse

If you do want to see the eclipse but are stuck in the Bay Area on Monday, fear not: Although the region doesn’t lie on the path of totality, we can catch a glimpse of a partial (or about 75 percent) eclipse — that is, if Karl the Fog is cooperative.

Set your alarm to 10:15 a.m. — or a few minutes earlier, for some wiggle room — so you don’t miss it.

If you don’t end up seeing it in person, of course, there’s the Eclipse Megamovie Project, a crowdsourced venture spearheaded by UC Berkeley and Google, which pulls together volunteer-submitted images of the eclipse from across the country. So, like the sun come Monday, you’ll be covered.

Librarian Teplitzky says, if the weather allows, she’ll likely step outside to look at the eclipse — “with my eclipse glasses,” she adds, referring to the protective eyewear that filters out harmful rays.

You’ll want to nab a pair, even if you’re watching from the Bay Area. After all, you wouldn’t want to risk your eyesight for when the next total solar eclipse is visible in the United States — in 2024.

Sources: ABC Channel 7, American Astronomical Society, “Chasing Eclipses: The Total Solar Eclipses of 1905, 1914, 1925,” NASA, “Total Eclipses: Science, Observations, Myths and Legends”, “Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them,” Washington Post

Fall Workshops in the Sciences Libraries – Drop in and Learn!

This fall there is once again a packed schedule of drop-in workshops in the Science and Engineering Libraries! Topics include Citation Management, Literature Searching, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Data Management, Data Visualization, NCBI tools, LaTeX, and more. Please check the Science Libraries Events Calendar for times, dates, locations, and class descriptions.

Wiley Spectra Lab: Search the world’s largest NMR spectral collection

Do you need a fast, easy way to access spectra and identify an unknown compound?

Wiley Spectra Lab has acquired spectral data from Wiley, Wiley-VCH, Bio-Rad Sadtler and others to present the world’s largest collection of curated spectral data. Current licensing includes C-NMR, H-NMR and X-NMR spectroscopies.

You can search Wiley Spectra Lab in OskiCat or access it through the Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library Guide under Properties and Data. Contact the Chemical Information Librarian, Kortney Rupp with any issues or questions.

An infographic describing Wiley Spectra Lab
Infographic for Wiley Spectra Lab

The eclipse, the Library, and you

Chasing Eclipses

Whether you’re hopping in an Oregon-bound car to catch the total solar eclipse in Salem, boarding a plane for central Wyoming to watch the moon’s shadow pass over Casper, or just staying put to catch a partial view right here in the Bay Area, the library has tons of great information to help you enjoy this rare celestial event. Make sure to check out our Maps and More Guide about the eclipse (and solar eclipses in general). Read Chasing Eclipses (pictured above), a 1929 account of the total solar eclipses of 1905, 1914, and 1925. See this 1957 report from the Georgetown Observatory about eclipses by Vera Rubin (who, incidentally, helped make the case for the existence of dark matter, as described in this New York Times profile). And for a literary accounting of a total solar eclipse, find a copy of Annie Dillard’s Teaching a Stone to Talk and and (re)read her essay about her experience watching (and feeling) the sun disappear behind the moon in central Washington on February 26, 1979:

What you see in an eclipse is entirely different from what you know. It is especially different for those of us whose grasp of astronomy is so frail that, given a flashlight, a grapefruit, two oranges, and fifteen years, we still could not figure out which way to set the clocks for Daylight Saving Time. Usually it is a bit of a trick to keep your knowledge from blinding you. But during an eclipse it is easy. What you see is much more convincing than any wild-eyed theory you may know.

Overleaf and ShareLaTeX – Joining Forces!

Overleaf and ShareLaTeX, online collaborative LaTeX editors, will soon be merging into one platform, utilizing their individual strengths. Both tools emerged on the market around the same time in 2012, seeing incredible growth and promise from users as longterm, useful tools. In January 2017, the UC-Berkeley Library subscribed to both tools in order to provide our researchers and students with pro account features of both tools. Both tools enable users to collaborate with groups and individuals on documents; simplify file directories; provide real-time previews; quickly identify errors; and provide access to excellent training tools and hundreds of templates from publishers and different types of documents, not just articles. If you regularly write documents in LaTeX, consider integrating one of these tools into your workflow. Both of them integrate with citation management software, git or GitHub, and provide revision history. Overleaf and ShareLaTeX contribute to a research workflow environment of transparency and preservation, both of which lend well to sharing and revisiting data and notation by others or your future self.
overleaf logo and ShareLaTeX logo
Individually, ShareLaTeX and Overleaf have focused on developing different strengths.
Overleaf:
  • WYSIWYG editor
  • publisher relationships for streamlined submission process
  • integration with Mendeley (which we also have an institutional subscription to!)
ShareLaTeX


The merger of the two platforms will focus on bringing together the strongest components of each tool. For now,  you can continue to create accounts on either platform and continue with your work. The founders of ShareLaTeX and Overleaf would like input from their users through this survey.


In the meantime, please join us at the Kresge Engineering Library to learn more about LaTeX and how to write in ShareLaTeX and Overleaf. We will be holding three workshops at the beginning of fall semester, in the Kresge Engineering Library Training Room:


August 24th, 4:00 – 5:00: Introduction to LaTeX
August 31st, 4:00 – 5:00: Typesetting in Math
September 7th, 4:00 – 5:00: Creating Tables, Figures, and Bibliographies


Please register through this form.


Please let us know if you have any questions about the Overleaf and ShareLaTeX merger, or the upcoming workshops.

ASHRAE Standards and Guidelines: now online!

UC Berkeley researchers now have full online access to standards issued by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). ASHRAE Standards and Guidelines are widely used by researchers and professionals in the design and maintenance of indoor environments and those interested in refrigeration processes. Access is provided through the Techstreet Enterprise platform and requires the proxy or VPN from off-campus.

In addition to the Standards and Guidelines, ASHRAE also publishes a series of Transactions and Handbooks. Interested in other ASHRAE publications? Check OskiCat for access or contact a librarian for help!

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