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Research Tools Fair, Feb 17

Want to learn about tools to help you be more effective with research, writing, and citation management in the sciences? Join us for our first ever Research Tools Fair on Friday, February 17!

The Fair will consist of brief product demos in the morning followed by drop-in Q&A with vendors in the afternoon. The Fair is open to all but geared toward faculty and students in the physical sciences & engineering. Please drop by for any part of the day that interests you. Coffee & soft drinks will be provided.

Logos of the 5 research tools

Research Tools Fair
Date: February 17, 2017
Location: Engineering Library Training Room (110MD Bechtel)

Schedule:

Research Data Publishing & Licensing 101

Please join Science Data & Engineering Librarian Anna Sackmann and Scholarly Communication Officer Rachael Samberg for practical tips about why, where, and how to publish and license your research data.

This workshop will be held from 11 a.m.–12 p.m., Doe Library, Rm. 190 (BIDS) on February 16, 2017 as part of Love Your Data Week. Check out the reservation form!

Why Should We Care About Publishing Research Data?

Sharing research data promotes transparency, reproducibility, and progress. Indeed, it can spur new discoveries on a daily basis. It’s not atypical for geneticists, for example, to sequence by day and post research results the same evening—allowing others to begin using their datasets in nearly real time (see, for example, Pisani & AbouZahr’s paper about this data publishing cycle). The datasets researchers share can, in turn, inform business or regulatory policymaking, legislation, government or social services, and much more.

Publishing your research data can also increase the impact of your research, and with it, your scholarly profile. Depositing datasets in a repository makes them both visible and citable. You can include them in your CV and grant application biosketches. Conversely, scholars around the world can begin working with your data and crediting you. As a result, sharing detailed research data can be associated with increased citation rates (check out this Piwowar et al. study, among others).

Publishing your data may also be required. Federal funders (e.g. National Institutes of Health), grant agencies (e.g. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), and journal publishers (e.g. PLoS and other journals listed in this Open Access Directory) increasingly require that datasets be made publicly available to readers—often immediately upon associated article publication.

How Do We Publish Data?

Merely uploading your dataset to a personal or departmental website won’t achieve these aims of promoting knowledge and progress. Datasets should be able to link seamlessly to any research articles they support. Their metadata should be compatible with bibliographic management and citation systems (e.g. CrossRef or Ref Works), and be formatted for crawling by abstracting and indexing services. After all, you want to be able to find other people’s datasets, manage them in a your own reference manager, and cite them as appropriate. So, you’d want your own dataset to be positioned for the same discoverability and ease of use.

How can you achieve all this? It sounds daunting, but it’s actually pretty straightforward and simple. You’ll just want to select a data publishing tool or service that is built around both preservation and discoverability: It should offer you a stable location or DOI (which will provide a persistent link to your data’s location), help you create sufficient metadata to facilitate transparency and reproducibility, and optimize the metadata for search engines.

For instance, UC’s Dash tool is a terrific and easy-to-use solution that preserves and publishes your datasets. At the Feb. 16 workshop we’re hosting, you can learn more about how to prepare, describe, and upload your data for deposit and publishing with Dash and other tools.

We also recommend that, if your chosen publishing tool enables it, you should include your ORCID (a persistent digital identifier) with your datasets just like with all your other research. This way, your research and scholarly output will be collocated in one place, and it will become easier for others to discover and credit your work.

What Does it Mean to License Your Data For Reuse?

Uploading a dataset—with good metadata, of course!—to a repository is not the end of the road for shepherding one’s research. We must also consider what we are permitting other researchers to do with our data. And, what rights do we, ourselves, have to grant such permissions—particularly if we got the data from someone else, or the datasets were licensed to us for a particular use?

To better understand these issues, we first have to distinguish between attribution and licensing. Citing datasets is an essential scholarly practice. But the issue of someone citing your data is separate from the question of whether it’s permissible for them to use the data in the first place. That is, what license for reuse have you applied to the dataset?

The type of reuse we can grant depends on whether we own our research data and hold copyright in it. There can be a number of possibilities here. For instance, sometimes the terms of contracts we’ve entered into (e.g. funder/grant agreements, website terms of use, etc.) dictate data ownership and copyright.   Sometimes, our employers own our research data under our employment contracts (e.g. the research data is “work-for-hire”). In some cases, the dataset might not be copyrightable to begin with if it does not constitute original expression. We could run into hot water if we try to grant licenses to data for which we don’t actually hold rights. For an excellent summary addressing these “Who owns your data?” questions, including copyright issues, check out this blog post by Katie Fortney written for the UC system-wide Office of Scholarly Communication.

To try to streamline ownership and copyright questions, and promote data reuse, often data repositories will simply apply a particular “Creative Commons” license or public domain designation to all deposited datasets. For instance:

  • Dryad and BioMed Central repositories apply a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation to deposited data—meaning that, by depositing in those repositories, you are not reserving any copyright that you might have. Someone using your dataset still should cite the dataset to comply with scholarly norms, but you cannot mandate that they attribute you and cannot pursue copyright claims against them.
  • UC Dash applies a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license to datasets deposited by UC researchers. This means that someone using your Dash-deposited dataset not only should cite it to adhere to scholarly norms, but also is required to attribute you as the author.

What’s the Right License or Designation for Your Data?

Well, sometimes you don’t have a say in the matter, as your funding agreement or the repository you choose dictates the license applied. Otherwise, it’s worth considering what your goals are for sharing the data to begin with, and selecting a designation or license that both meets your needs and fits within whatever ownership and use rights you have over the data. Your Scholarly Communication Officer or librarian can help you with this.

Bear in mind that ambiguity surrounding the ability to reuse data inhibits the pace of research. So, try to identify clearly for potential users what rights are being granted in the dataset you publish.

How To Learn More if You’re a UC Berkeley Researcher

Come to the workshop, of course! For data publishing questions, contact the Research Data Management team at researchdata@berkeley.edu. With questions about data ownership, copyright, or licensing, contact the Library’s Scholarly Communication Officer at rsamberg@berkeley.edu. You can also check out the Research Data Management website for more on preserving and disseminating your data. In the meantime, we hope to see you at the workshop next week!

by Rachael Samberg in Scholarly Communications on February 9th, 2017

Trip Database: Find Clinical Evidence Fast

Trip database logo

 

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to find high-quality research evidence to support clinical practice and care.

Search across research evidence, images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

Check it out!

ACS and RSC to require ORCIDs

orcid-logo

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) recently signed the ORCID Open Letter. For published articles the two societies will now require ORCIDs (Open Researcher and Contributor IDs) for corresponding authors and will automatically collect and display the ORCIDs of all submitting authors. The RSC announcement states that coordination between the publishers, Crossref and ORCID will ensure that published works are properly attributed.

In adopting the ORCID system RSC and ACS join a number of other publishers and journals including eLife, the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), the American Geophysical Union (AGU), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Science journals, Wiley, and Wellcome Open Research.

Celebrating their service: Susan Edwards and Brian Quigley win 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award

The toughest crowd to impress is often the one closest to you. Colleagues share many of the same challenges — competing projects, ambitions, and timelines among them. So when Berkeley librarians join to applaud one of their own, you know it means something.

This year’s winners of the Distinguished Librarian Award are Susan Edwards, head of the Social Sciences Division, and Brian Quigley, head of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Division. “I’ve been a librarian for a long time, and am passionate about what I do,” explains Edwards. “Being honored by my peers is incredibly moving.”

The Distinguished Librarian Award is given biennially to up to two librarians recognized for their excellence by a committee of peers and faculty. The awards are administered and funded by the Librarians Association of UC Berkeley.

BRIAN QUIGLEY
In 2013, Quigley led the integration of five separate engineering and physical science (EPS) libraries into the inaugural subject division. Through the creation of this and five other divisions, over 20 subject specialty libraries have been grouped into affinity groups.

By pulling together a highly distributed workforce into larger communities, this reorganization has enhanced staff collaboration and efficiency, and has supported the streamlining and sharing of services among libraries.

A few of Quigley’s other achievements include better serving user needs by thoroughly assessing and restructuring EPS reference services, and by forming an EPS faculty library committee and a student committee to provide input on the library’s programs, outreach and acquisitions.

For Quigley, working with people is key. He derives the most satisfaction from mentoring staff, consulting with students and faculty, and collaborating with his colleagues. “When faced with difficult decisions, the staff and I often ask ‘What would Brian do?’,” explains engineering librarian Lisa Ngo.

Brian Quigley, winner of the 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

Quigley manages the Kresge Engineering, Chemistry, Mathematics Statistics, Earth Sciences and Map, and Physics-Astronomy libraries. These serve roughly 500 faculty, 2800 graduate students, and 5000 undergraduate students in the relevant fields. Quigley is thought of as an experimenter. He frequently tries out new offerings and services based on the ideas and observations of his staff and library clients. “What we find effective is to pilot things,” he says, “and then use feedback to refine ideas and better address user needs.”

Recent pilot programs with broad student impact include joining the popular Packd app, which provides students with a real-time look at seat availability; providing an ASUC-funded REST Zone; extending the Engineering Library hours; improving student services, such as offering presentation kits for checkout, laptop lending, and more moveable whiteboards for group study; and encouraging staff in initiating their popular Maps and More series at the Earth Sciences and Map Library.

“Campus itself is such a stimulating and exciting environment,” explains Quigley. “The quality of the faculty and the caliber of the students are so inspiring. It always makes me want to be a better librarian and to serve them better.”

SUSAN EDWARDS
Susan Edwards loves the library profession because it offers “the chance to help people, together with lots of intellectual stimulation and reward.”

As division head for social sciences, she provides leadership for five libraries — Anthropology, Business, Education Psychology, Environmental Design, and Social Research. She also manages the Data Lab.

“All the social sciences disciplines are looking at how to use research to effect social change, to improve people’s lives,” explains Edwards “Information and social justice really belong together, because information is key for individuals and groups who want to change their lives.”

Susan Edwards, winner of the 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award. (Photography by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

Susan Edwards, winner of the 2016 Distinguished Librarian Award. (Photo by Alejandro Serrano for the University Library)

The most satisfying aspect of her work, she says, is working closely with students, faculty, and independent researchers. “I love helping them think through the process, and seeing their excitement when they get the information they need,” Edwards says.

After earning her M.L.I.S. at Berkeley in 1980, Edwards worked at the University Library for seven years as head of newspapers and microforms. She then went east and assumed a series of positions at the Amherst College Library.

Returning to Berkeley in 2009, Edwards was surprised at the relatively low level of entitlement among many Cal students. “It’s more about creating an environment where we’re teaching students that they can expect more support,” she explained. “Yes, they do deserve an hourlong appointment to get help with their research!”

She adds, “I love being at a public research university that’s committed to diversity and equity. We represent a pathway to mobility for many of our students, and their commitment to service inspires me. I feel lucky to be here.”

One of Edwards’ recent achievements was the process of combining three different libraries’ collections — Education, Psychology, and Social Welfare — into the Social Research Library. To help pare down and combine the materials, Edwards studied dissertation citations and noted the types of resources the three units’ students were using most. Faculty and students served by the new Social Research Library consider the transition a real success.

To build intellectual community, Edwards has launched a series of popular book talks at the library that draw faculty, students, alumni and community members. The gatherings are reinvigorating the Social Research Library as a center of learning and interaction.

“This is such an exciting time to be a librarian at Berkeley,” Edwards reflects. “Because of the far easier access to information through technology, a library’s traditional roles are now only one part of the suite of services needed. So we are rethinking the role of the library more broadly, and how it affects the life of scholarship and discovery on campus.”

Reflecting on Susan’s many contributions to the academic vitality at Berkeley, psychology professor Stephen Hinshaw noted her creativity and leadership. “Indeed, I wasn’t prepared for what a librarian in the UC system could do!”

Webcast: BD2K Open Data Science Symposium

Big Data to Knowledge

Open Data Science Symposium: How Open Data and Open Science are Transforming Biomedical Research; Details at http://event.capconcorp.com/wp/bd2k-odss/

The Open Data Science Symposium is open to the public and will be available through a webcast.

Big Data is an underutilized resource for innovation and discovery in biomedical research and the NIH is committed to unleashing its full potential by making it an open and easily accessible resource. The Open Data Science Symposium will feature discussions with the leaders in big data, open science, and biomedical research while also showcasing the finalists of the Open Data Science Prize, a worldwide competition to harness the innovative power of open data.

Please Register for the Open Data Science Symposium by November 18, 2016.

Registration is free.

Who Should Attend:

Join us for this meeting if you are interested in:

  • Learning how NIH and other agencies are utilizing new models and funding approaches to support open innovation and open science
  • Exploring the challenges, opportunities, and implications of a changing biomedical research landscape in which openness is the default across the globe
  • Seeking to use open data in your own research and looking for inspiration from international teams who have developed award-winning prototypes
  • Watching live demos of all six Open Science Prize semifinalists, and participating in the awards process through casting your vote for your favorite innovation

Event Highlights:

  • Dialogue between current NIH Director, Dr. Francis Collins, and former NIH and former NCI Director, Dr. Harold Varmus, on open science at the National Institutes of Health
  • Live demonstrations of six award-winning prototypes developed by international teams competing for the Open Science Prize.
  • Panel discussion on new models for advancing data sharing capability through innovative infrastructure and initiatives with perspectives from leading international organizations such as ELIXIR, Wellcome Trust, and Global Alliance for Genomics and Health.
  • Keynote by John Wilbanks, Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks, who has been named by Seed Magazine as one of the “revolutionary minds” and featured in Scientific American for his visionary thinking.

Acknowledgements

This symposium is funded through the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Initiative, which was launched in December 2013 as a trans-NIH program with funding from all 27 Institutes and Centers as well as the NIH Common Fund.

The Open Science Prize is made possible through a collaboration between NIH and the Wellcome Trust. The Howard Hughes Medical institute is also contributing funds for this effort.

ChemSearch Challenge 2016

The Elsevier-Reaxys ChemSearch Challenge is a chemistry search competition. A new challenge consisting of four or five questions will be posted every week for 8 consecutive weeks, and players compete on the speed with which they can submit correct answers.

Players can compete as individuals or groups, and a $200 donation will be made on behalf of each week’s winner to their choice of Doctors Without Borders, World Wildlife Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council, Partners in Health, or Oxfam International. In order to compete, an account is required.

The first challenge was posted on October 17, and subsequent challenges will be posted every Monday at 12 pm GMT.

For more information, please see:

NTRL discontinues Digital-on-Demand service

The National Technical Reports Library (NTRL) has discontinued its Digital-on-Demand service. Requests for digitization will no longer be filled after October 1, 2016.

NTRL indexes over 3 million U.S. government agency reports with more than 800,000 reports available as full-text PDFs. Questions about pending unfulfilled digitization requests can be directed to NTRLHelpDesk[at]ntis[dot]gov.

 

Global Engineering Academic Challenge

It’s time again for the Global Engineering Academic Challenge! Starting today, Monday, October 10th, Elsevier will post a challenge question each Monday for the next 5 Mondays (5 questions total). Complete this interdisciplinary challenge with your instructors and peers by solving problem-sets based built around 5 transdisciplinary themes including Future of Energy, Future of Making, Future of Medicine.

Each week, the winner with the highest points will receive $100 to Amazon. The first place grand prize is an Apple iPad and the second place prize is a set of Sonos speakers.

Visit the Engineering Academic Challenge to begin!

RSC Historical Collection

rsc historical collection bookshelf

The Royal Society of Chemistry Historical Collection covers nearly 500 years of the development and evolution of the chemical sciences. Books, journals, letters, lecture notes, pamphlets, monographs, plus minutes and publications from learned societies are included. Some highlights of the collection:

  • materials on alchemy and early chemistry dating back to the early 16th century
  • materials on explosives and firearms dating back to 1598
  • materials formerly in the possession of the family of Sir Humphry Davy and containing items from Antoine Lavoisier, John Dalton and Justus von Liebig, among others
  • backfiles of the journal Education in Chemistry

To access the RSC Historical Collection, go to Historical books and papers or Society publications and minutes.

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