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Scholarly Communications

Library kicks off Open Access Week with talks, tips, treats

On Monday, the University Library kicked off the first of five days of Open Access programming, designed to help Berkeley students better understand and utilize Open Access publishing. Workshops cover everything from how your dissertation will be published, to how you can publish your data for maximum impact, or how your digital humanities project will be preserved for future generations. Check out the full program and follow the action live on Twitter.

Photographs by Rachael Samberg for the University Library

Open Access Week 2016. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Students can access OA resources in key locations all week, including Doe Library. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Open Access Week postcards. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Open Access Week postcards highlight the events. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Open Access Week schwag. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Open Access Week schwag keeps OA nerds happy. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Open Access Week session. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Digital humanities researchers and stakeholders discuss the future of research in Doe Library. (Photo by Rachael Samberg for the University Library)

Open Access Week is a global effort to highlight the connections that OA makes possible by removing barriers between readers and scholarly publication. Through OA, people around the world can more easily find, use, cite, and build upon knowledge and ideas.

Connect Your Scholarship: Open Access Week 2016

Open Access Week 2016

Open Access connects your scholarship to the world, and for the week of Oct. 24-28, the UC Berkeley Library is highlighting these connections with five exciting workshops and panels.

What’s Open Access?

Open Access (OA) is the free, immediate, online availability of scholarship. Often, OA scholarship is also free of accompanying copyright or licensing reuse restrictions, promoting further innovation. OA removes barriers between readers and scholarly publications—connecting readers to information, and scholars to emerging scholarship and other authors with whom they can collaborate, or whose work they can test, innovate with, and expand upon.

Open Access Week @ UC Berkeley

OA Week 2016 is a global effort to bring attention to the connections that OA makes possible. At UC Berkeley, the University Library—with participation from partners like the D-Lab, California Digital Library, DH@Berkeley, and more—has put together engaging programming demonstrating OA’s connections in action. We hope to see you there.

Schedule

To register for these events and find out more, please visit our OA Week 2016 guide.

  • Digital Humanities for Tomorrow
    2-4 pm, Monday October 24, Doe Library 303
  • Copyright and Your Dissertation
    4-5 pm, Monday October 24, Sproul Hall 309
  • Publishing Your Dissertation
    2-3 pm, Tuesday October 25, Sproul Hall 309
  • Increase and Track Your Scholarly Impact
    2-3 pm, Thursday October 27, Sproul Hall 309
  • Current Topics in Data Publishing
    2-3 pm, Friday October 28, Doe Library 190

You can also talk to a Library expert from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. on Oct. 24-28 at:

  • North Gate Hall (Mon., Tue.)
  • Kroeber Hall (Wed.–Fri.)

Event attendance and table visits earn raffle tickets for a prize drawing on October 28!

Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Library, and organized by the Library’s Scholarly Communication Expertise Group. Contact Library Scholarly Communication Officer, Rachael Samberg (rsamberg@berkeley.edu), with questions.

Q & A with New Scholarly Communications Officer

The Library’s new Scholarly Communications Officer, Rachael Samberg, offered this overview of her work recently. Rachael joined us in late June and came from Stanford Law School’s library, where she was head of reference & instructional services and lecturer in law. Her recent presentation in the Library is available at Slide Share.

What inspires you about this new position?

The system of scholarly communication—through which research and other scholarly writings and output is created, evaluated, disseminated, and preserved—has been around for centuries, but it’s going through incredible changes now at every stage of its lifecycle. There are so many exciting opportunities and roles for the Library in helping to support and shepherd these changes—whether we are talking about promoting discoverability and recognition of our scholars’ research and writing, helping to shape funding models that will sustain scholarly communication as open and accessible for use and re-use, making data and text more available for research and analysis, disseminating and preserving emerging types of scholarly communication (like data sets, visualizations, and code), and beyond.

The UC System performs nearly one-tenth of all the academic research and development conducted in the United States, and produces approximately one-twelfth of all U.S. research publications. So, the Library’s ability to bring added visibility and provide lifecycle support for UC Berkeley scholars’ research and publishing can thus have tremendous global impact, and potentially help us shape national and international policies and practices in scholarly publishing.

What particular challenges do we face?

How do we make sure that our scholars have research and published materials available for review, use, and reuse in writing, teaching, and learning? How do we ensure that scholars can discover the information they need, and have their work discovered by others to increase their impact and promote idea exchange?

UC Berkeley is no exception to progressive constraints resulting from the fact that the books, periodicals and journals in which research findings are published (and that scholars and students need to access) are expensive and often available only through increasingly out-of-reach subscription fees. This also is a large, multi-disciplinary campus. Needs and preferences vary across disciplines—everything from how important scholars feel open access is to maximizing their scholarly impact and communicating findings, to what type of Library support researchers need for finding, using, and preserving their output. There likely will not be solutions that universally satisfy all of our scholars’ needs—so the challenges lie in being adaptive and responsive to individuals and programs, and creating tailored support and outreach across an expansive campus.

Yet, the so-called challenges are also the great fun of it! It will be immensely satisfying to help build responsive and nuanced policies to support use and access of research and collections, and promote visibility and discoverability of UC Berkeley’s scholarly output. And, besides, who doesn’t love a good, thorny copyright or licensing question in the process?

What are your priorities over the next 6-9 months?

The Library is a service organization, and support for scholarly communication will be a suite of services, too, covering scholars’ needs in research, publication, teaching, and access and use issues for library collections. I’m working on developing the program plan now, and the priorities will be to:

  • Create a website outlining services, and brimming with helpful guidance materials for researchers on all aspects of the scholarly publishing lifecycle.
  • Help develop policy and provide education regarding permissions and licensing questions for research and library collections, and use of intellectual property in one’s research, scholarship, and course materials.
  • Create and provide tailored training materials and workshops for students and faculty.
  • Provide training and updates on scholarly communication issues for library staff. (We are all scholarly communication service providers at the Library!)
  • Work towards making more educational resources open and affordable for students.
  • Foster campus engagement around open access publishing, and the UC OA policy.
  • Engage in strategic planning and analysis to help shape the scholarly communication field more broadly, to help benefit the UC Berkeley community and beyond.

Whew! There’s a lot going on even in the short term. These priorities necessitate a significant amount of outreach and intake, so you’ll likely see me running around campus to meet with people and offer workshops and support.

Post contributed by:
Damaris Moore
Library Communications Office

New Scholarly Communications Officer, Rachael Samberg

Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communications Officer

Rachael Samberg has accepted our offer of the position of Scholarly Communications Officer.

Rachael comes to us from the Stanford Law Library. She is completing her sixth year there as a reference librarian and lecturer in law. Before that she spent seven years as an intellectual property attorney at Fenwick & West LLP in San Francisco. She has her J.D. from Duke University, an MLIS from the University of Washington, and a BS in Biology and Classics from Tufts University.

From these highlights, you can see that Rachael brings both considerable IP legal experience, librarian experience, and teaching expertise to lead our growing commitment to becoming a leader in the worldwide movement to transform the scholarly communications landscape. She will put all these skills to great use, as she advises faculty, grad students and other researchers on how to use scholarly materials in their research and publications, how to disseminate their findings in ways that broaden its reach and impact, and how our campus can engage in programs and practices that hasten the transition from a closed-access, subscription based publishing world to one with open access and lower costs.

Another area in which Rachael has developed expertise is not as directly relevant to her new position, but will surely be of interest to a number of our folks: legal archives. Rachael has been chair of the Archives Committee of the Northern California Association of Law Libraries since 2011, and has published several articles on preserving legal history and collecting state court files. I’m imagining she’ll be spending her lunch breaks noodling around in the basement of Bancroft where we keep the California land case archives.

Jeff MacKie-Mason
University Librarian

Open Access Publishing Vouchers Available for RSC Journals – 2015

Publish gold open access articles in RSC journals at no charge

The UC Berkeley Library is partnering with the Royal Society of Chemistry to support free Gold Open Access publishing under the RSC’s Gold for Gold initiative.

This program offers voucher codes that enable Berkeley researchers to publish their paper in Royal Society of Chemistry journals free of charge, as a Gold Open Access (OA) article, without paying the normal article publication fee (between £1000 and £2500).

Benefits of Gold OA publishing

Gold Open Access publishing makes electronic versions of papers accessible to readers for free – without any subscriptions or fees.

Removing paywall barriers may increase the visibility of research findings since works are easier to disseminate, easier to find, and easier to read.  Further details about RSC journals and Open Access are available here.

You are eligible if

  • You are affiliated with UC Berkeley or LBNL (e.g., student, staff, faculty) and
  • Your article is new and has been accepted for publication by RSC (i.e., vouchers cannot be used for articles that have already been published) and
  • You have not previously received a Gold for Gold voucher from the UC Berkeley Library in 2015

Get your voucher code

After your article has been accepted for publication by an RSC journal, please complete the form at http://goo.gl/GAUwr to request your Gold for Gold voucher code.

Due to limited numbers, the Library will distribute the voucher codes on a first-come-first-served basis.

Fine print

  • Voucher codes are provided only after your article has been accepted for publication
  • Voucher codes must be used before December 31, 2015

Questions

Please contact Jeffery Loo, Chemistry Librarian, at jloo [at] berkeley.edu

Open Access Publishing Vouchers Available for RSC Journals – 2014

Publish gold open access articles in RSC journals at no charge

The UC Berkeley Library is partnering with the Royal Society of Chemistry to support free Gold Open Access publishing under the RSC’s Gold for Gold initiative.

This program offers voucher codes that enable Berkeley researchers to publish their paper in Royal Society of Chemistry journals free of charge, as a Gold Open Access (OA) article, without paying the normal article publication fee (between £1000 and £2500).

Benefits of Gold OA publishing

Gold Open Access publishing makes electronic versions of papers accessible to readers for free – without any subscriptions or fees.

Removing paywall barriers may increase the visibility of research findings since works are easier to disseminate, easier to find, and easier to read.  Further details about RSC journals and Open Access are available here.

You are eligible if

  • You are affiliated with UC Berkeley or LBNL (e.g., student, staff, faculty) and
  • Your article is new and has been accepted for publication by RSC (i.e., vouchers cannot be used for articles that have already been published) and
  • You have not previously received a Gold for Gold voucher from the UC Berkeley Library in 2014

Get your voucher code

After your article has been accepted for publication by an RSC journal, please complete the form at http://goo.gl/GAUwr to request your Gold for Gold voucher code.

Due to limited numbers, the Library will distribute the voucher codes on a first-come-first-served basis.

Fine print

  • Voucher codes are provided only after your article has been accepted for publication
  • Voucher codes must be used before December 31, 2014

Questions

Please contact Jeffery Loo, Chemistry Librarian, at jloo [at] berkeley.edu

BRII Update

March 26, 2014: Due to the popularity of the program, the Berkeley Research Impact Initiative (BRII) has used up its funds. No new applications for BRII funding are being accepted at this time.

Those who have already been approved for funding may still submit reimbursement requests.

For other open access publishing options, see Free OA options for Berkeley authors. For questions about BRII or open access in general, contact openaccess@lists.berkeley.edu.

Free OA options for Berkeley authors

UC Berkeley authors have several options to publish their article in open access journals. Open access (OA), which is literature that is free, digital and available to anyone online thus ensuring broad worldwide readership has the potential to increase the impact of the research presented.

Listed below are three peer-reviewed, rapid dissemination, OA journals in which Berkeley authors can publish without paying an article processing charge (APC).

  • PeerJ: publishes original research in the biological, medical and health sciences. Due to a partnership with the Berkeley Library, there is no cost for Berkeley authors to publish in PeerJ. (read more)
  • SAGE Open: publishes original research and review articles in humanities, social and behavioral sciences. The Library underwrites Berkeley authors’ publishing costs. (read more)
  • eLife: publishes original research in life sciences and biomedicine. It is free to publish in eLife while the journal is being established though there are plans to institute article processing charges for authors in the future.

There are many other options for publishing open access, most of which require authors to pay an article processing charge (APC). For more information on these publishing outlets, see Selective List of Open Access Fees.

If you have any questions, please ask your Library Liaison.

Dissertations on eScholarship

More than 2600 electronic dissertations and theses (ETDs) by UC Berkeley authors are now available on eScholarship dating back to 2009. UC Berkeley dissertations continue to be available on ProQuest Theses and Dissertations (a subscription database) and on the Library digital repository. By making them more available on eScholarship, however, these dissertations will be more easily discoverable via Google. This step towards greater open access is consistent with the Graduate Division’s longstanding position — one shared by the Berkeley Library — that “UC Berkeley upholds the tradition that [Berkeley scholars] have an obligation to make [their] research available to other scholars.”

You can see Berkeley dissertations on eScholarship by browsing Theses and Dissertations. You can also narrow your results by discipline or campus.

Berkeley dissertations will continue to be cataloged in OskiCat. Dissertations published since 2009 include  links to a publically-available version of the dissertation housed on the Library’s digital repository.

For access to thousands of freely-available dissertations from over 800 colleges and universities, go to the Open Access Theses and Dissertations database.

Dissertations on eScholarship

More than 2600 electronic dissertations and theses (ETDs) by UC Berkeley authors are now available on eScholarship dating back to 2009. UC Berkeley dissertations continue to be available on ProQuest Theses and Dissertations (a subscription database) and on the Library digital repository. By making them more available on eScholarship, however, these dissertations will be more easily discoverable via Google. This step towards greater open access is consistent with the Graduate Division’s longstanding position — one shared by the Berkeley Library — that “UC Berkeley upholds the tradition that [Berkeley scholars] have an obligation to make [their] research available to other scholars.”

You can see Berkeley dissertations on eScholarship by browsing Theses and Dissertations. You can also narrow your results by discipline or campus.

Berkeley dissertations will continue to be cataloged in OskiCat. Dissertations published since 2009 include  links to a publically-available version of the dissertation housed on the Library’s digital repository.

For access to thousands of freely-available dissertations from over 800 colleges and universities, go to the Open Access Theses and Dissertations database.

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