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California Department of Public Health

Richmond Instruction: PubMed My NCBI Hands-On Class

Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 10-11:30am
Computer Training Room P-1246, Building P
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Monday, June 12th to Michael Sholinbeck at
msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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NON-BUILDING P OCCUPANTS: Please make sure to register so your name will be on the class participant list given to the Building P Security Desk for entry into Building P.

PLEASE NOTE: This class is limited to 16 participants. A waiting list will be created, if appropriate, for an additional class.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

Do you want to know how to:

* How to save your PubMed search(es) and receive e-mail updates as new relevant citations are added to PubMed?

* How you can permanently store citations you find from a PubMed search?

* Share a list of citations with colleagues?

* Are you interested in customizing the PubMed display such that searches are filtered into categories of your choice?

* Are you interested in keeping track of searches run and citations viewed during the previous 6 months?

If you’ve answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s PubMed: My NCBI Hands-on class!

Topics covered will include:
1. How to register for a My NCBI account
2. How to save searches and have PubMed periodically re-run the search and automatically e-mail you new citations
3. How to permanently save and share citations in My NCBI
4. How to set up search filters in PubMed, so search results are sorted into your desired categories (e.g., age groups, citations that link to other databases, etc.)
5. Other features of My NCBI

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here.

Sacramento Instruction: Food/Nutrition Resources class

Wednesday June 28, 2017, 1:30-2:30pm
Hearing Room 72.167
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Monday, June 26 to Michael Sholinbeck at
msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Need to find literature on food and nutrition and their relationship to health?

* Want to know the nutritive value of different kinds of foods, from broccoli to Big Macs?

* Interested in how many fruits and vegetables Californians eat daily and other statistical information?

* Interested in food safety information, such as food-borne outbreaks, recalls, and methods of analysis?

* Want to know about quality sources of food/nutrition information for consumers?

* Curious about what professional resources (e.g., free training courses) are available to you?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Food/Nutrition Resources class!

Some of the topics that will be covered:
1. Using databases such as Agricola to find journal articles on food and nutrition topics
2. Resources for finding the nutritive value of foods
3. Finding statistics on food consumption
4. Information for consumers or for developing consumer material
5. Tools for professionals

Class Objective:
An introduction for CDPH staff to quality professional food and nutrition resources that will support CDPH work. Use of these resources will help staff locate relevant statistics, policies/best practices, and evidence-based research. Professional tools can assist in staff skill development. These training sessions are free to CDPH staff.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here.

Professional Development: Becoming a Successful Leader

Want to learn about best practices in leadership? Would you like to practice these skills in a safe class setting? Then this might be the course for you!

In this course, you will learn about leadership research and study some best practices followed by both great leaders and everyday people. In addition, you will have the opportunity to explore the empowerment, accountability, courage, and humility—key leadership skills linked to inclusive, successful teams.

Throughout this self-paced course, you will meet people like yourself who want to be the best leaders they possibly can by incorporating inclusive leadership into their work lives.

Fees: Free or add a Verified Certificate for $50
Time: 1-1.5 hours per week for 4 weeks

Find out more including how to register online here.

Advancing Health Equity Efforts in a Changing Policy Environment: an online discussion

Join the June 19th discussion where three leading experts with federal-level expertise at the US Departments of Health and Human Services, Agriculture, and the US Treasury, will share strategies and points of leverage for organizations and individuals who seek to continue their efforts to promote health equity. This discussion will be practical and interactive.

Date: June 19
Time: 10am PDT
Registration: available online here

This discussion is part of The Network Commons. The Network Commons is the Build Healthy Places Network’s live online discussion series on cross-sector strategies to improve neighborhood health and well-being.

How Cultural Alignment and the Use of Incentives Can Promote a Culture of Health: A new RAND report

Are you interested in learning how cultural identity can be harnessed to create a culture of health? Want to read about how incentives can be used to promote health and well-being? Then you might want to read this report published by RAND which was sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The research was conducted within RAND Health.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation asked RAND to examine these two topics to help it understand how organizations are addressing and leveraging culture and incentives to promote health and well-being, as well as to identify facilitators, barriers, potential best practices, and lessons learned that may inform future work in these areas.

This report draws on a series of interviews that RAND researchers conducted with stakeholders whose work focused on cultural alignment, incentives, or both to learn how organizations are addressing and leveraging culture and incentives to promote health and well-being, as well as to identify facilitators, barriers, potential best practices, and lessons learned.

2017 Annual Review of Public Health Now Freely Available Online

The 2017 Annual Review of Public Health is now available via an open access, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA) license. Annual Reviews have also released all 37 back volumes (1980-2016) under the same license, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. This is a special open access release from the publisher which they hope to be able to find funding for into the future.

Topics covered in the latest volume include:
* climate change and collective violence
* the changing epidemiology of autism spectrum disorders
* the health impact of large-scale changes in public policy
* the value of organic foods in the diet
* surveillance systems to track obesity prevention efforts

The Annual Review of Public Health, in publication since 1980, covers significant developments in the field of public health, including key developments in epidemiology and biostatistics, environmental and occupational health, issues related to social environment and behavior, health services, and public health practice and policy.

New Books!

The Public Health Library has the following new books available in print:

1. The Aging workforce handbook: individual, organizational, and societal challenges. Edited by Alexander-Stamatios Antoniou, Ronald J. Burke, and Sir Cary L. Cooper. Bingley: Emerald Publishing, 2017.
Call number:HD6279 .A445 2017
Read a synopsis and an excerpt at amazon.com.

2. The future of health economics. Edited by Olivier Ethgen and Ulf Staginnus. London; New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2017.
Call number: R728 .E874 2017
You can read a description, view the table of contents, and read an excerpt at the publisher’s website.

3. Out in the rural: a Mississippi health center and its war on poverty. By Thomas J. Ward Jr. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2017.
The first historical account of America’s first rural community health center.
You can see a description and read an excerpt on amazon.com.

and here are some new titles available online from the National Academies Press:

4. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

5. Global Health and the Future Role of the United States. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

6. Valuing Climate Damages: Updating Estimation of the Social Cost of Carbon Dioxide. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

Please note that these books are only a small selection of what is newly available. If you are interested in checking out any book(s), submit a request using our online form and we will mail the book(s) to you.

You may also log into your web portal account to request book(s).

If you do not currently possess a UC Berkeley library card, you will need to apply for one before we can check out a book to you.

CDPH in the News May, 2017

CDPH in the News

Celebrity-fueled FNV campaign expands to include access to affordable, fresh produce

from Food Navigator

The FNV campaign, which the Partnership for a Healthier America launched in 2015, initially concentrated on urban and rural areas with limited fresh produce consumption, such as Fresno, Calif., and Hampton Roads, Va., but it quickly spread nationwide and now is expanding at the state level. By using celebrities in bright, bold and quirky ads that show children that the people they admire eat fruits and vegetables not just because they have to, but because they want to helped the FNV campaign significantly increased produce consumption, according to PHA. It reports that research it conducted in pilot markets shows seven out of 10 survey respondents say they ate more fruits and vegetables after seeing or hearing about the campaign, and grocery retailers that brought the campaign in-store saw a measurable rise in produce sales. Building on this initial success, FNV now is expanding through Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education initiatives at the state level, PHA announced at its annual Summit in Washington, DC, earlier this month. Through public-private partnerships with the California Department of Public Health, the University of Georgia SNAP-Ed and the Colorado Department of Human Services, the FNV campaign will focus on reaching low-income consumers in communities in these states with limited access to affordable and diverse produce.

Botulism sickens 10, kills 1 gas station nacho diner

from boing boing

Evidently, many more people eat gas station nachos than I had previously considered possible. A Sacramento, California area botulism outbreak has been traced back to folks who enjoyed the tasty treat at a local refueling station.
Gas station nacho cheese that sickened 10 people and killed one of them was contaminated with botulinum toxin, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) confirmed Monday. “The nacho cheese sauce was removed from sale on May 5. (The California Department of Public Health) believes there is no continuing risk to the public,” the agency said in a statement.

Los Angeles company recalls deer-antler tea after 2 get sick

from KNTV

The California Department of Public Health says a Los Angeles company is recalling tea made from deer antler after two people who drank it got sick. State health officials said Monday that the tea may be contaminated with botulism, and they are investigating the two Orange County residents who became ill. They say the company, U.S. Deer Antlers Exports and Imports Inc., sold the tea to acupuncturists and others in California, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia.
The tea is sold in 6-inch by 4-inch plastic packaging with Korean language text and drawings of deer on it.

UC Davis Study Utilizes Safety Net Connect’s eConsult System to Evaluate the Role of an Integrated Approach to Improving Access to Tobacco Cessation Services for Underserved LA Residents

from SYS-CON Media

Safety Net Connect (SNC), a leading provider of innovative healthcare technology for organizations assisting underserved populations, is pleased to announce that its electronic consultation “eConsult” system used by Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LADHS) is engaged in a two-year-long University of California, Davis (UC Davis) study to measure the benefits of an integrative approach to tobacco cessation, in partnership with California Smokers’ Helpline (Helpline), a free, evidence-based smoking cessation program funded by the California Department of Public Health, the Centers for Disease Control, and First 5 California.
This collaborative project, funded through a Community Practice-Based Research Planning Award from the Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program (TRDRP) of California, was launched with the aim of creating and fostering long-term sustainable partnerships to conduct cost-effective, high quality tobacco cessation programs that are replicable across clinics throughout California. Several months into the project, SNC’s eConsult technology has already demonstrated a positive change in the delivery of tobacco cessation services for underserved populations, while increasing access to evidence-based tobacco treatment.

Pot brownies could lose some punch under proposed California rules

from Sacramento Bee

The ubiquitous billboards and product labels for Korova Edibles, an Oakland marijuana confections manufacturer, feature a three-eyed cow and a mooing boast: “Unrivaled potency.” Korova’s “20 dose” medical cannabis Black Bar chocolates are supercharged with 1,000 milligrams of THC, marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient, and the company’s new THC Blondie – a treat “packed with caramel chunks” and “covered in crushed pretzels” – has 10 50-milligram doses with a total punch of 500 milligrams.
Now state Department of Public Health potency limit recommendations for medical marijuana edibles threaten to upset Korova’s marketing strategy and could force the company to dramatically cut THC levels in its chocolates, cookies, brownies and pot-infused popcorn sold through more than 750 marijuana dispensaries and delivery services in California.

Workshop on radiological, “dirty bomb” risks held in California

from Homeland Preparedness News

The Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), in conjunction with the California Department of Public Health and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, recently held a radiological security workshop May 2-3 to discuss radiological materials and ways to reduce the risks they pose. The workshop’s 60 participants discussed the high number of radiological sources found in the state as well as risk mitigation. Each presentation sought to highlight steps that can be taken to secure radiological sources and how to replace them with alternative technologies when appropriate.

Richmond Instruction: PubMed Advanced Hands-On Class

Wednesday, May 10, 2017, *TWO SESSIONS* 10-11:30am OR 1:30-3pm
Computer Training Room P-1246, Building P
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Monday, May 8th to Debbie Jan at
djan@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.

*Indicate which session you would like to attend.*

Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

**NOTE: We are offering the same class twice. Choose the 10am class OR the 1:30pm class. There are only a couple of seats left in the morning class.

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NON-BUILDING P OCCUPANTS: Please make sure to register so your name will be on the class participant list given to the Building P Security Desk for entry into Building P.

PLEASE NOTE: Each class is limited to 16 participants.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

It is highly recommended, but not required, that you have already taken the PubMed Basics class, or already have a basic understanding of and ability to search PubMed. This class will not cover what was covered in the PubMed Basics class.

* Want to learn more about focusing your search using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)?

* Want to know how to effectively use MeSH subheadings?

* Want to learn how to use “evidence-based medicine” filters, useful for both clinical medicine and epidemiology?

* Want to learn about using PubMed’s Topic-Specific Queries, such as Comparative Effectiveness, Healthy People 2020, Health Disparities, and more?

* Interested in alternative PubMed interfaces that facilitate seeing new patterns or insights on your search results?

* Interested in other advanced features of PubMed?

If you’ve answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s PubMed Advanced Hands-On class!

Topics covered will include:
1. More about MeSH
2. Using MeSH Subheadings effectively
3. Clinical Queries
4. Topic-Specific Queries
5. Alternative PubMed Interfaces
6. Other Advanced PubMed features

Class Objective:
This class will teach you how to create more focused searches using MeSH and MeSH subheadings, and to quickly find “evidence-based medicine” citations utilizing PubMed’s pre-defined clinical queries.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online for you.

Sacramento Instruction: Program Evaluation Resources class

Wednesday May 24, 2017, 1:30-2:30pm
Hearing Room 72.167
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Monday, May 22 to Debbie Jan at
djan@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

————————-

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Do you need to do an evaluation of the programs you offer?

* Are you interested in learning about free online toolkits and other resources that will help you develop a program evaluation?

* Want to learn how to find an online class on program evaluation?

* Want to find resources with examples of other people’s program evaluations?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Program Evaluation Resources class!

Topics covered will include:

1. Resource Toolkits for program evaluation
2. “Best Practices” in program evaluation
3. Finding program evaluation literature
4. Professional tools for program evaluation

This class will NOT cover health promotion, health communication, or health education; this was covered in the Health Promotion/Health Education Resources class on April 26th.

Class Objective:
To introduce CDPH staff to quality program evaluation tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with developing effective program evaluations.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online so that you can plan ahead for any of interest.

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