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California Department of Public Health

CDPH in the News, January 2017

CDPH in the News

California Department of Public Health Reports Widespread Flu Activity that is More Severe than Last Year

from Sierra Sun Times

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith reported today that the state is experiencing widespread influenza activity that is more severe than last year due to significantly higher numbers of hospitalizations and outbreaks throughout the state. CDPH has also received the first report of a death associated with influenza in a child younger than 18 years of age. The death occurred in Riverside County. "This is a tragic reminder that the flu is a serious illness for people of all ages and kills thousands of Americans each year," said Dr. Smith. "If you haven’t been immunized yet this season, getting flu shots for you and your family now can still help protect you this winter."
Since the beginning of the influenza season, CDPH has received reports of 14 influenza-associated deaths, including the child in Riverside. This count represents a fraction of the total flu deaths statewide because only deaths in people younger than 65 are reported to the state and not all influenza-related deaths are easily attributable to influenza.
Hospitals statewide have been impacted by a surge in influenza patients, and hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza at Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California during the week ending January 7 reached 10.2 percent, the highest level recorded in 10 years. CDPH has also received reports of 83 influenza outbreaks, mostly in long-term care facilities, more than twice the reports received in recent years.

Why are a handful of measles cases an ‘outbreak’?

from KPCC

Los Angeles County’s public health department said Friday that it has confirmed two more measles cases, bringing to nine the number it has identified in the outbreak that it says began a month ago.
So why does such a small number of cases constitute an outbreak?
Public Health says it declared an outbreak because “the number of cases is definitely greater than expected and the majority of confirmed cases are epidemiologically linked.” The criteria for defining an outbreak depend on the particular disease. For “uncommon conditions,” the department says, an outbreak could be “two or more cases that are connected by social, environmental or geographical circumstance.”
While the department says there have been sporadic cases in the past 20 months, this is the first measles outbreak in L.A. County since the one that began at the Disney theme parks in Dec. 2014. By the time that outbreak was contained in April 2015, the California Department of Public Health had confirmed 136 cases statewide.

Genomic sequencing gives insight into Shigella outbreaks

from United Press International

Researchers have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015. Shigellosis causes abdominal pain, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal problems and results in roughly 500,000 infections, 6,000 hospitalizations and 70 deaths in the United States each year.
A team from UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health conducted the first major whole-genome study of S. sonnei strains in North America to gain insight into how the bacteria acquired virulence and antibiotic resistance, and to show the California strains’ relationship to other strains throughout the world.

California SNF fined $100k over safety violations that led to patient’s death

from Becker’s Hospital Review

The State of California has fined Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center, a skilled nursing facility in San Francisco, $100,000 after an investigation by the California Department of Public Health found safety violations that were a proximate cause of a patient’s death.
The safety violations occurred Nov. 26, 2014. According to the investigation report, a nurse assistant failed to lock both wheels of a patient’s wheelchair while on an outing to a movie theater and then left the patient unattended. The wheelchair rolled off the curb and the patient landed face-first on the ground. The patient, who had dementia and other chronic conditions, suffered severe injuries, including a face laceration, hip fractures and internal head bleeding, and died Dec. 10, 2014. According to the California Department of Public Health, $100,000 is the maximum fine state regulators can impose under state law.

California hospitals with high rates of HAIs have not been inspected in years, investigation finds

from Becker’s Hospital Review

While California law requires hospitals to be inspected every three years, 131 hospitals in the state have not been inspected in five years, and 80 of those hospitals have high rates of hospital-acquired infections, according to a petition filed by Consumers Union covered by the Los Angeles Times.
California does not require hospitals to report patient infections with certain rare superbugs nor does it require these facilities to report deaths resulting from HAIs. In order to identify hospitals in the state with troubling infection patterns, the national nonprofit Consumers Union looked at rates of a few HAIs that must be reported under a 2008 law. The pathogens included in the nonprofits analysis were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile. While Consumers Union said the data is not comprehensive, it has revealed which hospitals have struggled with controlling infections.
“It’s time to start looking at these hospitals that have significantly higher infection rates and do something that makes them accountable,” said Lisa McGiffert, director of Consumers Union’s Safe Patient Project, according to the LA Times. The petition requests the state investigate hospitals with high infection rates and enforce penalties for safety violations. The state must either respond to the petition in writing or hold a public hearing on the matter. According to the LA Times, the California Department of Public Health said it would respond within 30 days.

Richmond Instruction: *NEW* Environmental Health Resources class

Thursday, January 5, 2017, 10:00am-11:00am
Building C, Room 136
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Wednesday, January 4th to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Does your work at CDPH require you to access environmental health information, data, or other resources?

* Are you interested in learning about tools to help you find everything from environmental legislation, to continuing education sources, to environmental screening methods?

* Interested in environmental health topics like environmental justice, climate change, or nanotechnology?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Environmental Health Resources class!

Topics covered will include:

1. Tools for data visualization, continuing education, site assessment, and more
2. Information on selected topics in environmental health
3. Finding environmental health literature
4. Environmental health data sources

Class Objective:

To introduce CDPH staff to quality environmental health tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with finding environmental health data, literature, and more; and in developing evidence-based environmental health programs.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online for you so that you can plan for upcoming classes

Richmond Instruction: Toxicological Resources class

Wednesday, January 11, 2017, 10:00am-11:00am
Building C, Room 136
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Monday, January 9th to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

Do you:

* Want to find basic information on substances, such as properties, manufacturing and use, or methods of analysis?

* Need to find literature and data on pesticides, drugs, industrial chemicals, or other substances?

* Want to explore relationships between job tasks, exposure to toxic agents, and health effects?

* Want to learn about a tool to assist first responders at hazardous material incidents?

* Want to know the potential toxic effects of the ingredients in common household products, from shampoo to brake fluid?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Toxicological Resources class!

Some of the topics covered will include:

1. Online peer-reviewed databases with basic information on substances
2. Using bibliographic databases to find journal articles on chemicals, drugs, additives, etc.
3. Job-related exposures and their health effects
4. How to find out what’s in common household products

Class Objective:

To introduce or remind CDPH staff of freely available, quality toxicological resources. These resources cover topics such as physical and chemical properties of substances, methods of analysis, occupational exposure, policy and regulatory information, and tracking environmental releases of substances, as well as researching the toxic/adverse effects of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and
other substances.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online for you so that you can plan ahead.

Sacramento Instruction: EndNote X8 Basics Hands On class

Wednesday January 25, 2017, 10:30am-12pm
Enterprise Training Room 72.169
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Tuesday January 24 to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

This class is intended for CDPH staff who wish to gain a basic understanding of the EndNote X8 software program and how to use its features. Users of older versions of EndNote are welcome to attend. The EndNote X8 software will not be distributed at this class. If you need EndNote for your work, the instructor can tell you how to obtain a copy.

PLEASE NOTE: This class is limited to 12 participants. A waiting list will be created, if necessary, for an additional class. A few seats may be available on the day of the class so if you don’t register in advance, you can just show up to see if there is availability.

* Interested in a program that lets you easily create a customizable database of citations?

* Do you already have the EndNote program but are not sure what it can do for you?

* Do you write journal articles or reports and need to cite literature you’ve read or referenced?

* Are you already using EndNote and have some burning questions?

* Are you interested in a hands-on session so you can learn and practice using EndNote?

If you’ve answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s EndNote X8 Basics Hands-On class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Some new features in EndNote X8
2. How to populate your EndNote database with citations from PubMed and elsewhere
3. EndNote X8 features: display, search, groups, etc.
4. How to use “Cite While You Write” with Microsoft Word
5. How to get help

Class Objective:
Learn how to save time and work more efficiently:
– Save article and other citations in a customizable database
– Add PDF files to the references in your database
– Create groups to organize references by topic, project, etc.
– Add citations to a Word document, and automatically format the bibliography
and notes in any of thousands of styles

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online for you.

Web Portal Downtime

Over the weekend of Jan 6-8, the Public Health Library’s web portal will migrate to a new server. This change should be invisible to you, but in order to do this, we will take down the web portal on Friday, Jan 6 at around 3pm. It should be back up on Monday, Jan 9 in the morning. Please plan ahead if you think you will have any weekend needs.

If you need to make article or other requests during this period, please use the website, or you may call the Public Health Library at 510-642-2510.

Professional Development: Communicating Strategically online course

Want to learn some useful communications tactics? Interested in finding ways to frame your content so that it makes sense to others? Then this free online course might be of interest to you!

Examine and learn the essential components of communication strategy in this five-week class by Purdue Universtiy. In it, you’ll review communication skills, assess the value of communication, gain confidence in your abilities, and learn ways professionals can bridge the communication gap.

Begins: January 10, 2017
Length: 5 weeks
Effort: 4-6 hours a week
Cost: free with an optional Verified Certificate available for $49

This refresher is geared toward experts (scientists, engineers, and other technical professionals) and will help them effectively communicate with non-scientists, usually management, to inform organizational decision-making.

More information including how to register is available on the edX website.

Free webinar: Public Health Law: A Tool to Address Emerging Health Concerns

Would you like to get a quick overview of public health law from experts in the field? Are you interested in a better understanding of how the law can be used as a public health tool? Then you might wish to view this free webinar from the CDC.

In it, you will see a brief history of public health law and the difference it can make, looking at laws such as the New York City Sanitation Reform in the 1890’s. Then you’ll see selected examples of legal achievements in public health of the last century.

You’ll be exposed to present day examples of interesting measures of public health law. You’ll see examples of legal mapping, where provisions in law and policy are compared across jurisdictions or over time. You’ll learn about legal evaluations, or measuring the impacts of law and policy on health, and vice versa. You’ll learn about this and much more in this one hour discussion.

After viewing the webinar, you may wish to go Beyond the Data with Dr. John Iskander and Matthew Penn to hear them discuss the role of public health law in the federal, state, and local levels, including the tribes and territories. Or listen to Dr. John Iskander and Dr. Karen DeSalvo, Acting Assistant Secretary for Health as they discuss the role of public health in the recovery of New Orleans after Katrina, social determinants of health, and what is needed to get to public health 3.0.

This webinar is presented by the CDC’s Public Health Law Program on its 15th anniversary. The target audience for Grand Rounds includes physicians, nurses, epidemiologists, pharmacists, veterinarians, certified health education specialists, laboratorians, and others in public health. Grand Rounds is available for Continuing Education credits. Please see the pdf for details on these.

New Books!

The Public Health Library has the following new books available in print:

1. Essentials of health policy and law, 3rd edition. By Joel B. Teitelbaum and Sara E. Wilensky. Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2017.
Call number: RA395.A3 T45 2017
See the table of contents, reviews, and two sample chapters at the publisher’s website.

2. Healing Spaces, Modern Architecture, and the Body. Edited by Sarah Schrank and Didem Ekici. London; New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2017.
Call number: RA566.6 .H427 2017
View the table of contents, reviews, and a short excerpt at the publisher’s website.

3. Management principles for health professionals, 7th edition. By Joan Gratto Liebler and Charles R. McConnell. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2017.
Call number: RA393 .L53 2017
See the table of contents, reviews, and two sample chapters at the publisher’s website.

and here are some new titles available online from the National Academies Press:

4. Investing in Young Children for Peaceful Societies: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop.. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2016.

5. Ensuring Quality and Accessible Care for Children with Disabilities and Complex Health and Educational Needs: Proceedings of a Workshop..National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2016.

6. Relevance of Health Literacy to Precision Medicine: Proceedings of a Workshop. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Health and Medicine Division; Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2016.

Please note that these books are only a small selection of what is newly available. If you are interested in checking out any book(s), submit a request using our online form and we will mail the book(s) to you.

You may also log into your web portal account to request book(s).

If you do not currently possess a UC Berkeley library card, you will need to apply for one before we can check out a book to you.

CDPH in the News December 2016

CDPH in the News

Tyler Technologies Enables Sonoma County, California, to Digitize Marriage License Signatures

from Yahoo!

Tyler Technologies, Inc. (TYL) today announced a new offering in partnership with the Sonoma County Clerk and Recorder’s Office in California, which is using Tyler’s Eagle Recorder™ software to electronically print staff signatures on marriage licenses. Sonoma County is leading the charge in making this offering possible because of Eagle Recorder’s robust and intuitive capabilities.
Over the past several months, the Sonoma County Clerk and Recorder’s Office has led a pilot program in collaboration with the California Department of Public Health to print marriage licenses with digitized signatures of the issuing and registering clerks, thereby automating a once manual process. Sonoma is the first county in California to begin offering this service for county staff.

California Residents Learn About Common Asthma Triggers Found in Homes

from wEBwIRE

According to a report prepared by the Environmental Health Investigations Branch of the California Department of Public Health, approximately five million Californians have been diagnosed with asthma at some point in their lives. The report states that almost three million residents currently have asthma and that over one in five are considered to have very poorly controlled asthma.
"Understanding environmental triggers that can cause an asthma attack is important for those who suffer from the condition," said Michael Chapman, Laboratory Manager of LA Testing’s Huntington Beach facility. "At LA Testing, we offer comprehensive air testing services, sampling supplies and test kits for known allergens and asthma triggers. Indoor testing allows people to understand what they are being exposed to so they can take steps to mitigate or avoid exposure risks at home, school or in the workplace."

California’s Menu Labeling Law Takes Effect December 1, 2016, Months Ahead of FDA Enforcement

from Lexology

Eight years after being signed into law, California’s menu labeling law will finally go into effect on December 1, 2016. While FDA has delayed enforcement of the federal menu labeling standard until May 5, 2017, California’s Department of Public Health confirms that local health departments may begin inspecting restaurants subject to the statewide standard as early as December 1, 2016. The California Department of Public Health has recommended, however, that local health departments work with restaurants on complying with the law and not issue violations during the first six months of enactment.
In 2008, California became the first state in the U.S. to pass a menu labeling law requiring the disclosure of calorie information on restaurant menus and menu boards. The law initially applied only to chain restaurants that had at least 20 locations in the state and was set to take effect in 2011. After Congress passed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, however, the California legislature repealed its original menu labeling law and replaced it with a new version that was identical to the menu labeling provisions of the ACA. California also delayed implementation of its statewide standard until the compliance date of the federal FDA rule.

California Department of Public Health encourages caution around wild mushrooms

from SF Examiner

In the wake of recent wet weather, Dr. Karen Smith, the Director of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), is reminding Californians that picking and consuming wild mushrooms may not be a good idea unless you’re an expert. "It is difficult to distinguish between wild mushrooms that are poisonous and those which are safe to eat," said Dr. Smith. "Wild mushrooms should not be eaten unless they have been carefully examined and determined to be edible by a mushroom expert." According to data collected by CDPH, 679 cases of people ingesting mushrooms and subsequently becoming ill were reported between Nov. 2015 to Oct. 2016.

County receives $40k for campaigns to educate public about Zika

from Valley News

The Board of Supervisors signed off on a Riverside County Department of Public Health request to accept $40,000 in federal funding for education campaigns intended to help residents protect themselves against the Zika virus Tuesday, Dec. 13. In a 4-0 vote without comment, the board approved the health department’s plan to utilize $24,000 for education efforts in the current fiscal year and $16,000 in 2017-18.
The funds were distributed by the California Department of Public Health but originated from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, according to documents posted to the board’s policy agenda. The countywide education campaigns will highlight "measures to reduce mosquito breeding sources," according to a health department statement.

Sacramento Instruction: Google, Google Scholar, Google Books, and WorldCat class

Wednesday, December 7, 2016, 1:30-2:30pm
Hearing Room 72.167
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Monday, December 5th to Debbie Jan at Debbie.Jan@cdph.ca.gov or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

Did you know:

* You can limit your Google search to a particular domain (eg, .gov or.org) or even to a particular website (eg, cdph.ca.gov)?

* What is and is not included in different Google search products?

* You can import citations directly from Google Scholar into EndNote?

* You can perform cited reference searching in Google Scholar?

* Google Books allows you to read or preview books online?

* WorldCat lets you search for books and more in over 10,000 libraries?

If you’ve answered “No” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Google, Google Scholar, Google Books, and WorldCat class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Google search products: what’s in them?
2. Search tips
3. Setting preferences
4. Advanced search & cited reference searching
5. Shortcomings of using Google for research
6. How Google Books and WorldCat link to each other

Class Objective:
After this class, you will be able to perform more effective Internet searches, and will better understand the results that you retrieve. In addition, this class will provide you with helpful tips to efficiently search for articles and books.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available for you here.

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