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California Department of Public Health

Richmond Instruction: Public Health Informatics Web Tools Hands-on Class

Thursday, February 9, 2017, 10:00am-11:30am
Computer Training Room P-1246, Building P
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Tuesday, February 7th to Lee Adams at ladams@berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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NON-BUILDING P OCCUPANTS: Please make sure to register so your name will be on the class participant list given to the Building P Security Desk for entry into Building P.

PLEASE NOTE: This class is limited to 16 participants. A waiting list will be created, if appropriate, for an additional class.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

Do you want to know:

* About novel methods of disease surveillance?

* About free medical and health mobile applications?

* What “participatory epidemiology” is?

* More about integrating information technology into public health practices?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Public Health Informatics Web Tools Hands-on class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Public Health Informatics: What is it?
2. Brief overview of historical aspects
3. Tools you can use:
a. for outbreak or disease surveillance,
b. for decision-making and data collection,
c. for continuing education
4. Examples of public health applications of information technology

NOTE: This session will NOT include in-depth coverage of health information exchanges, meaningful use, data standards, or similar topics.

Class Objective:
To provide an introduction to Public Health Informatics, with examples of technological tools for public health work.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here.

Sacramento instruction: EndNote X8 Advanced Hands On class

Wednesday February 22, 2017, 10:30am-12pm
Computer Training Room 72.169
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Tuesday February 21 to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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PLEASE NOTE: This class is limited to 12 participants. A waiting list will be created, if appropriate, for an additional class. A few seats may be available on the day of the class so if you don’t register in advance, you can just show up to see if there is availability.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Do you want to learn how to use ‘smart groups’ to automatically group references together?

* Do you want to learn how to create or modify existing output styles?

* Did you know you can annotate PDF files in your library? And that you can search these annotations, as well as the content of PDFs in your EndNote library?

* Are you already using EndNote and have some burning questions?

* Do you want to konnw how you can share an EndNote library with others?

If you’ve answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s EndNote X7 Advanced Hands-On class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Creating Smart Groups
2. Creating/Modifying Output Styles
3. Annotating PDF files In EndNote
4. Other Advanced Features
5. Introduction to EndNote Online
6. How to get help

The EndNote X8 software will not be distributed at this class. If you need EndNote for your work, the instructor can tell you how to obtain a licensed copy from CDPH.

Class Objective:
Learn how to save time and work more efficiently by:
– Creating smart groups in your library.
– Modifying output styles to fulfill your needs.
– Annotating PDF files in your EndNote library.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here

Professional Development: Making Sense of Climate Science Denial

Have you ever wondered how to respond to misinformation around climate change? Do you want to learn more about the science behind climate change? If so, then you might want to take this free online course offered by edX.

In public discussions, climate change is a highly controversial topic. However, in the scientific community, there is little controversy with 97% of climate scientists concluding humans are causing global warming.

This course examines the science of climate science denial. Why is there such a gap between many in the public and scientists? What are the psychological and social drivers behind the denial of climate change?

You will look at the most common climate myths from “global warming stopped in 1998” to “global warming is caused by the sun” to “climate impacts are nothing to worry about.”

You’ll find out what lessons are to be learnt from past climate change as well come to a better understanding of how climate models predict future climate impacts. You’ll learn both the science of climate change and the techniques used to distort the science.

With every myth that is debunked, you’ll learn the critical thinking needed to identify the fallacies associated with the myth. Finally, armed with all this knowledge, you’ll learn the psychology of misinformation. This will equip you to effectively respond to climate misinformation and debunk myths.

Course length: 7 weeks
Time involved: 2 – 4 hours/week
Price: Free, with a Verified Certificate available for $49
Institution: University of Queensland, Australia
Instructors: A baker’s dozen from the US, Canada, the UK, and Australia

Registration is available online here.

Climate Change, Health, and Populations of Concern: an EPA website

All Americans, at some point in their lives, are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Some people are more affected by climate change than others because of factors like where they live; their age, health, income, and occupation; and how they go about their day-to-day lives. Understanding the threats that climate change poses to human health can help us work together to lower risks and be prepared.

EPA has developed communication materials that summarize key points from the U.S. Climate and Health Assessment for eight different populations that are disproportionately affected by climate change impacts. The agency is providing these materials for use and modification for anyone seeking to communicate the health impacts of climate change to a range of audiences.

You can read the interagency report The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment that these communication sheets were drawn from online as well.

Professional Development: Data Visualization for All

Want to learn how to tell your story and show it with data? This data visualization course will teach you how to design interactive charts and customized maps to illustrate your work.

You’ll start off with easy-to-learn tools, then gradually work our way up to editing open-source code templates with GitHub. You’ll follow step-by-step tutorials with video screencasts, and share your work for feedback on the web. You’ll see real-world examples drawn from Trinity College students working with community organizations in the City of Hartford, Connecticut.

This course is suitable for non-profit organizations, small business owners, local governments, journalists, academics, or anyone who wants to tell their story and show the data. No prior experience is required.

Begins on: Feb 28
Length: 6 weeks
Time involved: 3 hours/week
Price: Free, with a Verified Certificate available for $49
Institution: Trinity college (Hartford, CT)

You can register online for this class here.

How to Get Published in Peer Reviewed Journals: A Webinar

Thinking of writing an article for a peer-reviewed journal? Want to learn effective strategies that will help you to get it published? Then this free webinar may be of interest to you!

Editors and directors from the Public Health Reports present this one-hour webinar to help public health practitioners at the state and local levels turn their work into manuscripts for publication. The speakers will discuss general strategy of what is needed to begin thinking about an article for peer-reviewed literature, how to structure it, how to plan it, how to execute it, and how to position it so that it will be attractive to journals and their peer reviewers.

When: Thursday, Feb 16
Time: 10-11 am Pacific time

You can RSVP online here.

Health Disparities: You know there’s a need, now prove it! A Webinar

Is health disparities a part of your work? Do you need to provide policy makers, grant funders and other decision makers with statistics on it? Would you like to learn about possible sources for model interventions that you can replicate? Then this free webinar might be of use to you in your work. This entry-level presentation will explore mainly free online sources of reliable health statistics, research and evidence-based community interventions.

The webinar is suited for community-based organizations, public health workers, and public library staff and is presented by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region.

When: Friday, Feb 24, 2017
Time: 9–10 am Pacific time

Discovering Toxnet (and other NLM environmental health databases)

Would you like to learn how to search more effectively in TOXNET and the other National Library of Medicine’s environmental health databases? Then this free online class might be of interest to you!

You will explore these databases through videos, guided hands-on tutorials, and discovery exercises in your time with this class. TOXNET is a web-based system of databases covering hazardous chemicals, environmental health, toxic releases, chemical nomenclature, poisoning, risk assessment, regulations plus occupational safety and health.

The class is taught online in thirteen independent modules. You may choose to solely take the half hour Introduction to TOXNET, which is the only required module. The other 12 are optional. The modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, Haz-Map, LactMed, WISER, CHEMM, and REMM. Not sure what these are? You can see a description of each of these databases online.

You will work at your own pace. Instructors will be available to answer questions via email and provide assistance throughout the course.

When: March 1 – March 31

New Books!

The Public Health Library has the following new books available in print:

1. Recruiting the heart, training the brain: the work of Latino Health Access. By America Bracho, Ginger Lee, and Gloria P. Giraldo. Berkeley, California: Hesperian Health Guides, 2016.
Call number: RA778.4.H57 B72 2016
See more on this in OskiCat, UC Berkeley’s online catalog.

2. Improving health care management at the top: how balanced boardrooms can lead to organizational success. By Sharon Roberts and Milan Frankl. New York, NY: Business Expert Press, 2016.
Call number: RA971.R544 2016
See the table of contents and a short excerpt at amazon.com.

3. A practical approach to analyzing healthcare data. By Susan E. White. Chicago, IL.: American Health Information Management Association, 2016.
Call number: R864.K84 2016
View the table of contents in OskiCat.

and here are some new titles available online from the National Academies Press:

4. Strengthening the Workforce to Support Community Living and Participation for Older Adults and Individuals with Disabilities: Proceedings of a Workshop. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2016.

5. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop.The National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2016.

6. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2016.

Please note that these books are only a small selection of what is newly available. If you are interested in checking out any book(s), submit a request using our online form and we will mail the book(s) to you.

You may also log into your web portal account to request book(s).

If you do not currently possess a UC Berkeley library card, you will need to apply for one before we can check out a book to you.

CDPH in the News, January 2017

CDPH in the News

California Department of Public Health Reports Widespread Flu Activity that is More Severe than Last Year

from Sierra Sun Times

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith reported today that the state is experiencing widespread influenza activity that is more severe than last year due to significantly higher numbers of hospitalizations and outbreaks throughout the state. CDPH has also received the first report of a death associated with influenza in a child younger than 18 years of age. The death occurred in Riverside County. "This is a tragic reminder that the flu is a serious illness for people of all ages and kills thousands of Americans each year," said Dr. Smith. "If you haven’t been immunized yet this season, getting flu shots for you and your family now can still help protect you this winter."
Since the beginning of the influenza season, CDPH has received reports of 14 influenza-associated deaths, including the child in Riverside. This count represents a fraction of the total flu deaths statewide because only deaths in people younger than 65 are reported to the state and not all influenza-related deaths are easily attributable to influenza.
Hospitals statewide have been impacted by a surge in influenza patients, and hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza at Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California during the week ending January 7 reached 10.2 percent, the highest level recorded in 10 years. CDPH has also received reports of 83 influenza outbreaks, mostly in long-term care facilities, more than twice the reports received in recent years.

Why are a handful of measles cases an ‘outbreak’?

from KPCC

Los Angeles County’s public health department said Friday that it has confirmed two more measles cases, bringing to nine the number it has identified in the outbreak that it says began a month ago.
So why does such a small number of cases constitute an outbreak?
Public Health says it declared an outbreak because “the number of cases is definitely greater than expected and the majority of confirmed cases are epidemiologically linked.” The criteria for defining an outbreak depend on the particular disease. For “uncommon conditions,” the department says, an outbreak could be “two or more cases that are connected by social, environmental or geographical circumstance.”
While the department says there have been sporadic cases in the past 20 months, this is the first measles outbreak in L.A. County since the one that began at the Disney theme parks in Dec. 2014. By the time that outbreak was contained in April 2015, the California Department of Public Health had confirmed 136 cases statewide.

Genomic sequencing gives insight into Shigella outbreaks

from United Press International

Researchers have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015. Shigellosis causes abdominal pain, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal problems and results in roughly 500,000 infections, 6,000 hospitalizations and 70 deaths in the United States each year.
A team from UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health conducted the first major whole-genome study of S. sonnei strains in North America to gain insight into how the bacteria acquired virulence and antibiotic resistance, and to show the California strains’ relationship to other strains throughout the world.

California SNF fined $100k over safety violations that led to patient’s death

from Becker’s Hospital Review

The State of California has fined Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center, a skilled nursing facility in San Francisco, $100,000 after an investigation by the California Department of Public Health found safety violations that were a proximate cause of a patient’s death.
The safety violations occurred Nov. 26, 2014. According to the investigation report, a nurse assistant failed to lock both wheels of a patient’s wheelchair while on an outing to a movie theater and then left the patient unattended. The wheelchair rolled off the curb and the patient landed face-first on the ground. The patient, who had dementia and other chronic conditions, suffered severe injuries, including a face laceration, hip fractures and internal head bleeding, and died Dec. 10, 2014. According to the California Department of Public Health, $100,000 is the maximum fine state regulators can impose under state law.

California hospitals with high rates of HAIs have not been inspected in years, investigation finds

from Becker’s Hospital Review

While California law requires hospitals to be inspected every three years, 131 hospitals in the state have not been inspected in five years, and 80 of those hospitals have high rates of hospital-acquired infections, according to a petition filed by Consumers Union covered by the Los Angeles Times.
California does not require hospitals to report patient infections with certain rare superbugs nor does it require these facilities to report deaths resulting from HAIs. In order to identify hospitals in the state with troubling infection patterns, the national nonprofit Consumers Union looked at rates of a few HAIs that must be reported under a 2008 law. The pathogens included in the nonprofits analysis were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile. While Consumers Union said the data is not comprehensive, it has revealed which hospitals have struggled with controlling infections.
“It’s time to start looking at these hospitals that have significantly higher infection rates and do something that makes them accountable,” said Lisa McGiffert, director of Consumers Union’s Safe Patient Project, according to the LA Times. The petition requests the state investigate hospitals with high infection rates and enforce penalties for safety violations. The state must either respond to the petition in writing or hold a public hearing on the matter. According to the LA Times, the California Department of Public Health said it would respond within 30 days.

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