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California Department of Public Health

Richmond Instruction: PubMed Advanced Hands-On Class

Wednesday, May 10, 2017, *TWO SESSIONS* 10-11:30am OR 1:30-3pm
Computer Training Room P-1246, Building P
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Monday, May 8th to Debbie Jan at
djan@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.

*Indicate which session you would like to attend.*

Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

**NOTE: We are offering the same class twice. Choose the 10am class OR the 1:30pm class. There are only a couple of seats left in the morning class.

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NON-BUILDING P OCCUPANTS: Please make sure to register so your name will be on the class participant list given to the Building P Security Desk for entry into Building P.

PLEASE NOTE: Each class is limited to 16 participants.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

It is highly recommended, but not required, that you have already taken the PubMed Basics class, or already have a basic understanding of and ability to search PubMed. This class will not cover what was covered in the PubMed Basics class.

* Want to learn more about focusing your search using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)?

* Want to know how to effectively use MeSH subheadings?

* Want to learn how to use “evidence-based medicine” filters, useful for both clinical medicine and epidemiology?

* Want to learn about using PubMed’s Topic-Specific Queries, such as Comparative Effectiveness, Healthy People 2020, Health Disparities, and more?

* Interested in alternative PubMed interfaces that facilitate seeing new patterns or insights on your search results?

* Interested in other advanced features of PubMed?

If you’ve answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s PubMed Advanced Hands-On class!

Topics covered will include:
1. More about MeSH
2. Using MeSH Subheadings effectively
3. Clinical Queries
4. Topic-Specific Queries
5. Alternative PubMed Interfaces
6. Other Advanced PubMed features

Class Objective:
This class will teach you how to create more focused searches using MeSH and MeSH subheadings, and to quickly find “evidence-based medicine” citations utilizing PubMed’s pre-defined clinical queries.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online for you.

Sacramento Instruction: Program Evaluation Resources class

Wednesday May 24, 2017, 1:30-2:30pm
Hearing Room 72.167
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Monday, May 22 to Debbie Jan at
djan@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

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Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Do you need to do an evaluation of the programs you offer?

* Are you interested in learning about free online toolkits and other resources that will help you develop a program evaluation?

* Want to learn how to find an online class on program evaluation?

* Want to find resources with examples of other people’s program evaluations?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Program Evaluation Resources class!

Topics covered will include:

1. Resource Toolkits for program evaluation
2. “Best Practices” in program evaluation
3. Finding program evaluation literature
4. Professional tools for program evaluation

This class will NOT cover health promotion, health communication, or health education; this was covered in the Health Promotion/Health Education Resources class on April 26th.

Class Objective:
To introduce CDPH staff to quality program evaluation tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with developing effective program evaluations.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online so that you can plan ahead for any of interest.

Professional Development: Best Practices for Project Management Success

Want to learn more about project management principles and theories? Want to see examples of best practices? Then this free edX class might be of interest to you!

The course will cover:

* project management methods and best practices
* project portfolio management
* the project management office
* Six Sigma
* corporate culture and organizational behavior
* project management leadership

This course is part of the Rochester Institute of Technology MicroMasters Program that is designed to teach the importance of the organizational and leadership characteristics for the success of projects.

Begins: May 31, 2017
Length: 11 weeks
Cost: Free with the option to add a Verified Certificate for $150

More information is available on the edX website.

Healthcare Data Analytics, Population Health, and Value Based Care: Free online training

Healthcare Data Analytics, Population Health, and Value Based Care are being offered as asynchronous online training classes by Johns Hopkins University and Normandale Community College. All three are free through 6/20/2017 from the ONC (Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT) for those working in healthcare or a field related to healthcare.

Each of the three tracks offers 2-3 classes taking from 6-12 hours to complete. Courses will remain open for 4 weeks once begun.

Health Literacy Online: A Guide for Simplifying the User Experience

Do you create online health content for low-literacy users? If so, then this new guide from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion might be useful for your work.

Health Literacy Online offers strategies for writing, displaying, and organizing online health content.

These guidelines can help you:

* Write simple, actionable content
* Choose fonts that are easy to read
* Organize and label content in ways that are intuitive for users
* Design for a variety of screen sizes, including mobile phones
* Test your site with limited-literacy users

The guide is written for anyone involved in creating online health content from start to finish — writers and editors, content managers, digital strategists, user experience strategists, web designers, developers, and others. Health Literacy Online recognizes that writing and designing with low-literacy users in mind helps us all — ultimately resulting in health websites that are easier for everyone to understand and use.

New Books!

The Public Health Library has the following new books available in print:

1. Digital health innovation for consumers, clinicians, connectivity, and community: selected papers from the 24th Australian National Health Informatics Conference (HIC 2016). Edited by Andrew Georgiou, Louise K. Schaper, and Sue Whetton. Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press, 2016.
Call number: R858.A2 A937 2016
Read a description and browse the table of contents on the publisher’s website.

2. How to publish in biomedicine: 500 tips for success. By John Dixon, Louise Alder, and Jane Fraser. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2017.
Call number: R119 .D59 2017
See the table of contents and a short description at the publisher’s website.

3. Planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs: a primer, 7th ed. By James F. McKenzie, Brad L. Neiger, and Rosemary Thackeray.
New Jersey: Pearson, 2017.
Call number: RA427.8 .M39 2017
View the table of contents in OskiCat.

and here are some new titles available online from the National Academies Press:

4. Accomplishments of the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

5. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. The National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

6. Implementing Evidence-Based Prevention by Communities to Promote Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health in Children: Proceedings of a Workshop..The National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

7. Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2017.

Please note that these books are only a small selection of what is newly available. If you are interested in checking out any book(s), submit a request using our online form and we will mail the book(s) to you.

You may also log into your web portal account to request book(s).

If you do not currently possess a UC Berkeley library card, you will need to apply for one before we can check out a book to you.

CDPH in the News April, 2017

CDPH in the News

Vaccination Rates for California Kindergarteners Are Higher Than Ever After New Law

from KQED

Vaccination rates hit an all-time high for California kindergartners, the California Department of Public Health said Wednesday as it announced its first findings since a new law ended the era of the “personal belief exemption” that allowed thousands of parents to choose not to vaccinate their children who attend public and private schools. The percentage of kindergartners who received all required vaccines rose to 95.6 percent in 2016-17, up from the 92.8 percent rate in 2015-16. This is the highest reported rate for the current set of immunization requirements, which began in the 2001-02 school year, the state said.

Report Finds Dangerous Amount of Lead Found in Children in the Valley

from ABC 30

Peeling paint in aging homes, imported ceramics, even contaminated soil– all have the potential to cause lead poisoning. According to the California Department of Public Health– some Valley kids are exposed to dangerous amounts of lead; exposure that could harm a child’s nervous system and impair brain development. “It is a concern that should not be overlooked and it is a concern in our community and in others. We have a lot of housing that was built prior to 1978 that have lead based paint in there, and that is exposure that we want to mitigate,” said David Pomaville, Fresno County Public Health Director.
The report found that nearly 14-percent of children living in and around Downtown Fresno tested extraordinary high for lead– eight more Fresno County communities made the list. Local experts say those numbers are from 2012 and current data shows a decrease in lead exposure.

UC Irvine Medical Center Defends Its Handling Of MRSA Outbreak Infecting 10 Infants

from CBS Los Angeles

UC Irvine Medical Center on Thursday defended how it handled an outbreak of the dangerous superbug that infected 10 infants in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. The newborns tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA between August and March. But the babies were successfully treated, and the parents were notified, hospital spokesman John Murray said.
According to Marian Hollingsworth, a member of the state’s Healthcare Associated Infection Advisory Committee, she filed a complaint with the California Department of Public Health in August. She said she was alarmed that neither the hospital nor county health officials alerted the public immediately.

How will the cigarette tax hike affect the Sacramento region?

from ABC 10

Smokers will soon have to shell out an extra $2 when buying cigarettes. A $2 cigarette tax hike goes into effect April 1st, months after being approved by voters. The tax is estimated to bring in $1 billion to $1.4 billion in revenue, most of which will be allocated to increase funding for the Medi-Cal health care program for low income residents, as well as tobacco prevention programs and tobacco-related disease research among other things. The $2.87 tax will place California in the nation’s top ten cigarette tax rate.
Yolo and Placer Counties have the lowest number of smokers in the state. Yolo County had a 9.4 percent smoking prevalence among adults between 2012 and 2014, the third-lowest in California, according to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). Placer County had a 9.8 percent smoking prevalence, the fourth-lowest in the state.

Humboldt County Has California’s Highest Rates of Gun Deaths, Suicides and Fatal Car Crashes

from Lost Coast Outpost

Humboldt County is a dangerous place to be, and a big part of the problem is us. That has to be one of the key takeaways from the latest annual County Health Status Profiles report from the California Department of Public Health.
Granted, we’re no longer the most dangerous county in the state, as we were back in 2010. Nor are we the second most dangerous, as we were in 2011. No, this year we wound up in the same position as last year: sixth among California’s 58 counties on the list of where you’re most likely to buy the farm. But what’s even more alarming is how Humboldt County residents seem more than willing to meet the Grim Reaper halfway, often cashing in our chips not through natural causes but with our own reckless behavior.
Here’s what we mean: Among counties with reliable data, Humboldt County has the highest rates of death from firearms, car crashes and suicides, and we’re second-highest in how frequently we die from drugs, chronic liver disease and unintentional injuries.

Richmond Instruction: PubMed Basics Hands-On

Wednesday, April 12, 2017, 10:00am-11:30am
Conference Room P-1246
850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA

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RSVP by Tuesday, April 11th to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

————————-

NON-BUILDING P OCCUPANTS: Please make sure to register so your name will be on the class participant list given to the Building P Security Desk for entry into Building P.

PLEASE NOTE: This class is limited to 16 participants. A waiting list will be created, if appropriate, for an additional class.

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Do you need to find scientific evidence for a public health program, intervention, issue, or concern?

* Do you get irrelevant citations when searching PubMed?

* Do you get too many or too few search results when searching PubMed?

* Are you already using PubMed and have some burning questions?

* Are you interested in a hands-on session so you can learn and practice using PubMed?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s PubMed Basics Hands-On class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Introduction to PubMed
2. Retrieving Full Text Articles Using the CDPH PubMed URL
3. Effective Keyword Searching Using Boolean Logic and Filters
4. Finding and Using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
5. Other PubMed Features

Class Objective:
PubMed is the primary literature database for most topics in public health; the database comes from the National Library of Medicine. This class will teach you the basic skills needed to search PubMed to identify and obtain the most relevant information you need to perform your job. The skills you learn will
save you time by allowing you to search PubMed in a more efficient and effective manner.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here.

Sacramento Instruction: Health Promotion/Health Education Resources class

Wednesday April 26, 2017, 1:30pm-2:30pm
Hearing Room 72.167
1500 Capitol Ave, Sacramento

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RSVP by Monday April 24th to Michael Sholinbeck at msholinb@library.berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2510.
Please obtain your supervisor’s approval before you RSVP.

————————-

Supervisors: Please encourage your staff to attend if appropriate.

* Does your work at CDPH involve health promotion, health communication, or health education?

* Are you interested in learning about toolkits and other resources that will help you develop a health intervention program?

* Interested in how to find literature on health education/promotion topics?

* Do you need to develop consumer health handouts?

* Want to know about quality sources for consumer health information, including non-English language handouts and materials?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then please come to the Sheldon Margen Public Health Library’s Health Promotion and Health Education Resources class!

Topics covered will include:
1. Resource Toolkits for Developing Programs
2. “Best Practices” in Health Education/Promotion
3. Finding Health Education Literature
4. Patient/Consumer Health Education Materials

(This class will not cover program evaluation resources; there will be a separate Program Evaluation class on Wed. May 24, 2017.)

Class Objective:
To introduce CDPH staff to quality health promotion and health education tools and resources that are freely available online. Use of these resources will assist with efficiently developing effective, evidence-based health promotion programs.

These training sessions are free to CDPH staff. A certificate of completion will be available for those who attend the class.

A schedule of other upcoming training sessions is available online here.

*New* Icons in PubMed for Articles Freely Available at Institutional Repositories

PubMed now has another way to let you know about more articles that you can get for free. These new institutional repository (IR) icons will link to the free full text of the article at an institutional repository when the article is not freely available from the journal or from PubMed Central.

When an IR is participating in this new feature, the linking icon will show up in the “Full text links” section to the right of the abstract in PubMed. This linking icon will appear for any IR article that does not have another free full text option. The “LinkOut – more resources” section (which you’ll find
below the abstract) will also have a direct link to the full text available from the IR. This area will include links to all the available free full text options.

There are only a few IRs participating in the free full text LinkOut at this time but these few already expand access to about 25,000 publications. The California Digital Library’s eScholarship program is a participant. Click on any a article title here to see the icon for eScholarship.

More information is available in the National Library of Medicine’s Technical Bulletin.

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