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Summer Reading: Silent Spring

Silent Spring

Silent Spring
Rachel Carson
Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002

Originally published in 1962, Silent Spring is credited with advancing the concepts of environmentalism that led to the founding of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and existing laws that protect the air and water. Currently the agency, the Clean Air Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Clean Water Act are threatened. Gaining knowledge of the basis for the creation of the Agency and these environmental regulations allows one to articulate a position for maintaining and strengthening them.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Summer Reading: Where Song Began

Where Song Began

Where Song Began: Australia’s Birds and How They Changed the World
Tim Low
New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016

Low’s book challenges expectations that all species originated from similar areas of the globe, instead arguing that most birds around the world today originated in Australia–and that they have influenced the world, including humans, to sing. He provides interesting insights into the size and aggressiveness of Australian birds, as well as odd and rare species, such as those with poisonous feathers.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Get Your Sci-Fi Fix with Hugo Award Winners

Itching to get your hands on this year’s Hugo Award Winners? Start your search at the Library. Don’t overlook Berkeley native Ursula Le Guin!

 


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Summer Reading: Making Sense of Science

Making Sense of Science

Making Sense of Science: Separating Substance from Spin
Cornelia Dean
Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2017

Cornelia Dean was a New York Times science writer for over thirty years and is currently a writer-in-residence at Brown University. Given her excellent previous work, I have every confidence that her new book, Making Sense of Science, will be well written and informative. The book is targeted for non-scientists who seek the background needed to evaluate scientific claims. Books like Dean’s are especially timely because of the anti-science climate that now reigns in Washington.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

New Books in Graduate Services August 2017

One-way street

One-Way Street by Walter Benjamin

Bronzeville boys and girls

Bronzeville Boys And Girls by Gwendolyn Brooks illustrated by Faith Ringgold

Vulnerability in resistance

Vulnerability In Resistance edited by Judith Butler, Zeynep Gambetti, and Leticia Sabsay

Border Towns.

Border Towns by C.S. Giscombe

The literary in theory

The Literary In Theory by Jonathan Culler

The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo : the forgotten history of America's Dutch-owned slaves

The Pinkster King And The King Of Kongo: The Forgotten History Of America’s Dutch-Owned Slaves by Jeroen Dewulf

Macavity's not there! : a lift-the-flap book

Macavity’s Not There?: A Lift-The-Flap Book by T.S. Eliot and Arthur Robins

Skimbleshanks

Skimbleshanks The Railway Cat by T.S. Eliot and Arthur Robines

A change of class

The Cambridge Edition Of The Works Of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Change Of Class edited by James L. W. West III

The dead and other stories

The Dead And Other Stories by James Joyce edited by Melissa Free

Observations : poems

Observations: Poems by Marianne Moore edited with a new introduction by Linda Leavell

The novel of the future

The Novel Of The Future by Anais Nin with a new introduction by Deirdre Bair

The man without a shadow

The Man Without A Shadow by Joyce Carol Oates

The mischievous muse : extant poetry and prose by Ibn Quzman of Cordoba (d. AH 555/AD 1160)

The Mischievous Muse: Extant Poetry And Prose by Ibn Quzman Of Cordoba Volumes 1 & 2 edited, translated, and notes by James T. Monroe

Strange vernaculars : how eighteenth-century slang, cant, provincial languages, and nautical jargon became English

Strange Vernaculars: How Eighteenth-Century Slang, Cant, Provincial Languages, And Nautical Jargon Became English by Janet Sorensen

Technics and time. 3, Cinematic time and the question of malaise

Technics And Time, 3: Cinematic Time And The Question Of Malaise by Bernard Stiegler

The waves

The Waves by Virginia Woolf edited with an introduction and notes by David Bradshaw

Summer Reading: Paying the Price

Paying the Price

Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream
Sara Goldrick-Rab
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016

Goldrick-Rab conducted this study of thousands of young people to understand the obstacles they face in completing a degree whether at a two-year or four-year college. She discovered what you probably already know. Young people from middle class and low income families alike confront many challenges just to get an education: rising tuition and fees; the high cost of living (rent, food, gas, books, etc); a complicated and insufficient Federal aid program; difficulties finding flexible work that allows students to pay for and stay in school full time. Politicians will tell you that they worked their way through college and so should you. But, only a generation ago, theirs was a very different world in which hard work and determination got you a degree. Implementing policies that will make college affordable for all can happen. But first, we as a society must agree that a college education is a right for all and not just a privilege for those who can afford it.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Remembering Playwright Sam Shepard

Today we remember Sam Shepard, who passed away this past Thursday due to complications from Lou Gehrig’s disease. Shepard left behind a rich legacy as a major American playwright, best known for True West, Fool for Love, and Buried Child, for which he won the Pulitzer in 1979. Part of the post-World War II generation, Shepard wrote bare-bones, atmospheric plays with surreal elements and dark humor, exploring American mythologies, dysfunctional families, and outsider heroes. Known in his youth as Steve Rogers (no relation to Captain America, we think!), Shepard was born in 1943 and lived in many different places before his family settled down in California. After a productive sprint in New York City’s Off-Off-Broadway scene, Shepard returned to San Francisco’s avant-garde Magic Theatre (started by a UC Berkeley graduate student), where he succeeded Michael McClure as Playwright in Residence. You can see Shepard onscreen, too: he acted in several films and appeared most recently in Netflix’s Bloodline.

Explore More:
Browse the Library’s Sam Shepard collection
Find criticism and biography
Explore related Bancroft holdings, including records from the Magic Theatre


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New in Transgender Literature

Looking for a new book to add to your summer reading list? Try one of these recently acquired novels and poetry collections that feature transgender characters, explore gender identity themes, or are written by transgender writers. Happy reading!

 

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Summer Reading: Our Kids

Our Kids

Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis
Robert D. Putnam
New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015

Can we reduce inequality and improve the lives of America’s youth in a generation? This book, an exploration of inequality in the lives of American children, may be a cautionary tale in its sobering portrait of what happened in the author’s own lifetime. Robert Putnam grew up in the Midwest in the 1950s and most of the kids in his hometown took advantage of all that the American dream had to offer and went on to live better than their parents. As he and his researchers studied working families all across the country, what they observed was increased separation between those with a college education and those without. Educated families have more stable jobs, parent differently, and live in vastly different neighborhoods, all of which adds up to greater advantages and more opportunities for their children. Of course, health problems, divorce, and other life traumas do not discriminate by class but upper middle class families have more resources and more social capital to draw on and a bigger cushion to protect them when they hit a rough patch.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Finding Jane

Hello fellow Janeites! Today we’re celebrating the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death. At only 41, she left behind a formidable oeuvre and some of the most beloved characters in British literature. (Although Mark Twain certainly didn’t seem to think so.) You can judge for yourself with a stroll through the Library book stacks: PR4034 (Level D in the Main Stacks) is as good a place as any to begin your journey to Pemberley.

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