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Digital Humanities

Digital Humanities Grant Opportunities for Art Historians

3D Photogrammetry For Cultural Heritage Workshop

CFP deadline December 1, 2017.

A one-week training workshop (March 25-31, 2018) at UCSC on photogrammetry for early-stage graduate students. Participants in this workshop will gain intensive hands-on experience in the techniques and processing workflow for photogrammetric recording for cultural heritage projects, presented within the context of a critical engagement in discussions of the politics of digital knowledge production. Click here for more information: ARC Photogrammetry Workshop Call UCSC.

 

Research Project: Ed Ruscha’s “Streets of Los Angeles”

CFP deadline January 19, 2018.

Scholars from a wide range of fields are invited to submit proposals for research projects investigating Ed Ruscha’s “Streets of Los Angeles” archive—including, but not limited to digital humanities, cultural geography, architecture, art history, photography, and visual culture. Interdisciplinary approaches and team-based projects are particularly encouraged. Selected researchers would collaborate with Getty Research Institute (GRI) staff as part of a larger research-technology project, which seeks to digitize and make publicly-accessible a portion of the archive in innovative ways. The goal is to publish resulting scholarship at the close of the project. For more details, click here.

 

Visualizing Venice Summer Institute: Advanced Topics in Digital Art History: 3D (Geo)Spatial Networks

CFP deadline Janurary 5, 2018.

This Getty Foundation supported workshop will support interdisciplinary teams focused on the hard questions of Digital Art History as a discipline, a set of methods, and a host of technical and institutional challenges and opportunities.

Participants will gather from June 4-16, 2018 in Venice, Italy at Venice International University, with follow-up activities taking place over the course of the 2018-19 academic year, and leading into a follow-on gathering in Summer of 2019 that will operate as a writing and digital publication workshop, building upon work done over the course of the year by the project teams and in collaboration with our wider network.

 

NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

CFP deadline January 16, 2018.

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (DHAG) support digital projects throughout their lifecycles, from early start-up phases through implementation and long-term sustainability. Experimentation, reuse, and extensibility are hallmarks of this grant category, leading to innovative work that can scale to enhance research, teaching, and public programming in the humanities.

This program is offered twice per year. Proposals are welcome for digital initiatives in any area of the humanities.

 

 

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Catalan Futurist Manifesto digitized

Manifest Català

From the early 20th century until the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Spain witnessed a flourishing of literary and artistic forms (painting, poetry, prose and film) on par with the experimentialism taking place across Europe and Latin America. According to Jennifer Duprey in Avant-Garde Cultural Practices in Spain (1914-1936), self-taught poet and radical journalist Joan Salvat-Papasseit found inspiration in both the formalist attributes articulated in F.T. Marinetti’s Manifesto del futurismo (1909) and in the social terms of compatriot Gabriel Alomar’s El futurisme (1905). “He was the only Catalan writer that had the conscience of the revolutionary character that the Futurist movement had from a social point of view, yet sustained that his particular point of view was a dialectical concept of tradition,” explains Duprey.

Last fall the UC Berkeley Library became one of three libraries outside of Spain to own an original broadside of Contra els poetes amb minúscula: primer manifest català futurista (Against lowercase poets: the first Futurist manifesto) published in 1920 and is now the first institution in the world to have digitized it. Salvat-Papasseit’s famous collection of poems L’irradiador del port, i les gavines (1921), now housed in The Bancroft Library, was featured in the exhibition No Legacy || Literatura Electrónica installed in Doe Library’s Brown Gallery last year.

L'irradiador del port, i les gavines / J. Salvat-Papasseit.

L’irradiador del port, i les gavines (Barcelona: Atenes A.G., 1921)

Workshop: Share Your Scholarship: Humanities Commons

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Share Your Scholarship: Humanities Commons
Tuesday, November 14th, 4:10-5:00pm
Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle Hall 117 (Level D)

Humanities Commons, a new platform developed by the MLA and other humanities organizations, offers a professional alternative to for-profit academic networking sites like Academia.edu. In this workshop, we’ll learn how to make your research available online, develop an academic portfolio, and connect with colleagues at other universities using Humanities Commons. We’ll also touch on eScholarship, the digital repository of the University of California. Please bring a laptop if possible. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2017-2018:

  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects
  • Digital Scholarly Editions with TEI
  • Scalar for Multimedia Digital Projects
  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects
  • Omeka for Digital Collections and Exhibits
  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.

Undergraduate Research Talk by Gabriella Wellons

Are you an undergraduate student who is curious about the research process? Would you like to hear about the experience of one of your peers? Join us Wednesday, November 8th for a talk by Gabriella Wellons, undergraduate in Art History.

Ancient Graffiti and Emulation of Moche Mural Wall Paintings 

Gabriella Wellons, History of Art

Wednesday, November 8th, 12:10-1:00pm

Moffitt Library, Fourth Floor

During her summer travel to north coastal Peru, UC Berkeley senior Gabriella Wellons created a graphic record of graffiti at the Huacas de Moche archaeological complex, the site of a former urban and religious center with two monuments (Huaca del Sol y Huaca de la Luna), located within the Moche Valley. Her honors thesis will explore the relationships between ancient graffiti, murals, and ceremonial spaces, and the possible purposes and meanings of incised imageries set within the context of Moche visual culture. Gabriella is a recipient of the Haas Scholars Program, Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program, International Studies Institute (IIS) Undergraduate Merit Scholarship, George A. Miller Scholars Program and the Digital Humanities at Berkeley Summer Institute Fellowship.
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Workshop: WordPress for Easy and Attractive Websites

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

WordPress for Easy and Attractive Websites
Wednesday, November 8th, 4:10-5:00pm
D-Lab, 350 Barrows Hall

In this hands-on workshop, we will learn the basics of creating a WordPress site, a web-based platform good for blogs, scholarly portfolios, and websites. By the end of the workshop, you will know how to post content, embed images and video, customize themes and appearance, and work with plugins. Please bring a laptop if possible. Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

Upcoming Workshops in this Series 2017-2018:

  • Share Your Scholarship: MLA’s Humanities Commons
  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects
  • Digital Scholarly Editions with TEI
  • Scalar for Multimedia Digital Projects
  • Publish Digital Books & Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks
  • Copyright and Fair Use for Digital Projects
  • Omeka for Digital Collections and Exhibits
  • By Design: Graphics & Images Basics
  • The Long Haul: Best Practices for Making Your Digital Project Last

Please see bit.ly/dp-berk for details.

Qu’est-ce que l’accès ouvert?

Qu’est-ce que l’accès ouvert?

In recognition of Open Access Week 2017, here’s a link to the French translation of Peter Suber’s important summary of the open-access movement published in 2012. The English edition is openly available too of course.

HathiTrust Research Center UnCamp 2018

HathiTrust Research CenterThe UC Berkeley Libraries are excited to host the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) UnCamp, on January 25-26, 2018.

HTRC UnCamp 2018 aims to bring together researchers, developers, instructors, librarians, and other information professionals to showcase innovative research, participate in hands-on coding and demonstration sessions, and build community around themes of digital libraries, metadata, copyright, digital humanities,  computational text analysis, and digital pedagogy. The UnCamp will discuss topics relevant to understanding and utilizing the HathiTrust Digital Library, including:

  • Demystifying HathiTrust metadata
  • Fair use, copyright, and non-consumptive research
  • HathiTrust development, news, and updates
  • Digital pedagogy and text analysis curricula
  • Scholarly tools and methods for text analysis
  • Corpus creation

Register now for UnCamp

  • Early registration price of $100 through November 29, 2017.
  • Standard price of $150 begins on November 30, 2017.

HTRC UnCamp 2018 Keynote Speakers

HTRC is excited to welcome keynote speakers Elizabeth Lorang, David Mimno and Leen-Kiat Soh!

Dr. Lorang and Dr. Soh will be presenting about their Image Analysis for Archival Discovery (Aida) project, supported by National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) and Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Dr. Mimno will be discussing his text analysis work utilizing HathiTrust and HTRC data.

Call for Proposals: Priority Deadline of October 15

HTRC continues to accept proposals for panel presentations, lightning talks, and posters (more information on the CFP). These may address any aspect of digital text collections, computational text analysis, copyright and open access, digital pedagogy, and related topics, especially as these relate to the HTRC.

Proposals should be submitted through EasyChair:

  1. Please create an account at EasyChair if you do not have one already and then
  2. Submit your HTRC UnCamp proposal here

UnCamp Pre-conferences

The morning of January 25 will feature several pre-conference activities, free for HTRC UnCamp registrants, including:

  • HTRC Crash Course: What Is It and What Can I Do with It?
  • Mastering Metadata
  • Text Analysis FUN!damentals: Methods, Approaches, Tools and Techniques
  • Working with Restricted Collections: Technologies and User and Library Needs

About the HathiTrust Research Center and the HTRC UnCamp

The HTRC is a collaborative research center launched jointly by Indiana University and the University of Illinois, along with the HathiTrust Digital Library, to help meet the technical challenges of dealing with massive amounts of digital text that researchers face by developing cutting-edge software tools and cyberinfrastructure to enable advanced computational access to the growing digital record of human knowledge.

HTRC UnCamp 2018 is being organized with partners at Indiana University, University of California-Berkeley, University of Illinois, HathiTrust Digital Library, and the California Digital Library. The UnCamp will be hosted by the UC Berkeley Libraries in partnership with the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), the D-Lab, and the Academic Innovation Studio (AIS).

UPDATE: Elsevier Data Publishing Requirements

Last spring, we posted about data publishing requirements from Elsevier, Springer/Nature, and AAAS. At the time, Elsevier was the most lenient on their data publishing policies and used language that was suggestive and encouraging of data publishing. As of September 5th, 2017, that is no longer the case. Elsevier has signed on to the Transparency and Openness Guidelines (TOP) through the Center for Open Science. We talk and write a lot about transparency, openness, and sharing in science; however, there is a disconnect between the conversations and the daily workflows and practice of scientists. I was once told, after giving a workshop on data sharing, that I was an idealist trying to preach to realists. In order to close that gap, we need more publishers, like Elsevier, to make the ideal a reality, and enforce strict guidelines on data sharing and publishing.

Elsevier Logo

 

Let’s take a look at the 5 new data sharing requirements, which will be implemented for 1800 of Elsevier’s titles:

Option A:  you are encouraged to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article

Option B: you are encouraged to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • If you can’t do this, be prepared to explain why!

Option C: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • if you can’t do this, be prepared to explain why!

Option D: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article

Option E: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • peer reviewers will review the data prior to publication

The new Elsevier policy is similar in nature to Springer/Nature with their tiered system of requirements. It’s important to check with your individual journal to see which option it falls under. Ideally, you will always follow option E, where you make your data openly available, cited, linked, and provide the proper amount of metadata to go through the peer review process or be reused by another researcher.

 

If you have any questions about how to enrich the metadata of your dataset, or where to deposit your research data, please email researchdata@berkeley.edu!

 

 

Trial: Colonial America, with handwritten text recognition

Adam Matthew Digital (AMD) has completed three of five modules of Colonial America, an online resource that will include all 1,450 volumes of the CO 5 series from The National Archives, UK, covering the period 1606 to 1822. The Library currently has trial access to the three modules until October 16, 2017.

It is with the third module of Colonial America that AMD has implemented a technology that allows for full text searching of handwritten documents. The Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) application uses algorithms and artificial intelligence to determine possible combinations of characters in manuscripts.

The default search will search both metadata applied to documents and their text. When results are found in the text, they are displayed as snippets.

example of search results

 

 

 

 

 

Clicking on a hit will take you to the page where the word appears.

example of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This search function is ground-breaking, but not 100% accurate. I’ve searched for words that exist in a document and have retrieved no results. I have also searched for words that were written sloppily or with a long s and have retrieved results.

I am interested in your feedback on both the value of the database and your successes (or failures) with full-text searches. Email me at dorner@berkeley.edu.

(Please note that PDF downloads are not available during the trial.)

Maps & More: Hamilton!

Please mark your calendars for the first Maps and More pop-up exhibit of the semester!
Friday, September 22, 11 am – noon
Earth Sciences & Map Library, 50 McCone Hall
Hamilton, in Maps informational poster

You’ve listened to the musical, now put some names to places with maps related to Alexander Hamilton’s life and exploits. This month’s Maps and More collections show-and-tell event is offered in coordination with the On the Same Page program. Featuring maps and atlases from the Earth Sciences & Map Library collection, this exhibit helps put some geographic context to key events in Hamilton, from his birth in the West Indies to his years in Philadelphia and New York and his deadly duel on the banks of the Hudson.

 
We’re delighted to have history graduate student Nicole Viglini guest curating this pop-up exhibit. Nicole’s research interests include themes of race, culture, class, and gender in early and nineteenth-century America and the Caribbean.
 
We hope to see you there!
Susan Powell
Sam Teplitzky
 
ps: Save the date for next month’s Maps and More on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 11 am – noon with mapmaker Stace Wright of Eureka Cartography!

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