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HathiTrust Research Center UnCamp 2018

HathiTrust Research CenterThe UC Berkeley Libraries are excited to host the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) UnCamp, on January 25-26, 2018.

HTRC UnCamp 2018 aims to bring together researchers, developers, instructors, librarians, and other information professionals to showcase innovative research, participate in hands-on coding and demonstration sessions, and build community around themes of digital libraries, metadata, copyright, digital humanities,  computational text analysis, and digital pedagogy. The UnCamp will discuss topics relevant to understanding and utilizing the HathiTrust Digital Library, including:

  • Demystifying HathiTrust metadata
  • Fair use, copyright, and non-consumptive research
  • HathiTrust development, news, and updates
  • Digital pedagogy and text analysis curricula
  • Scholarly tools and methods for text analysis
  • Corpus creation

Register now for UnCamp

  • Early registration price of $100 through November 29, 2017.
  • Standard price of $150 begins on November 30, 2017.

HTRC UnCamp 2018 Keynote Speakers

HTRC is excited to welcome keynote speakers Elizabeth Lorang, David Mimno and Leen-Kiat Soh!

Dr. Lorang and Dr. Soh will be presenting about their Image Analysis for Archival Discovery (Aida) project, supported by National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) and Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Dr. Mimno will be discussing his text analysis work utilizing HathiTrust and HTRC data.

Call for Proposals: Priority Deadline of October 15

HTRC continues to accept proposals for panel presentations, lightning talks, and posters (more information on the CFP). These may address any aspect of digital text collections, computational text analysis, copyright and open access, digital pedagogy, and related topics, especially as these relate to the HTRC.

Proposals should be submitted through EasyChair:

  1. Please create an account at EasyChair if you do not have one already and then
  2. Submit your HTRC UnCamp proposal here

UnCamp Pre-conferences

The morning of January 25 will feature several pre-conference activities, free for HTRC UnCamp registrants, including:

  • HTRC Crash Course: What Is It and What Can I Do with It?
  • Mastering Metadata
  • Text Analysis FUN!damentals: Methods, Approaches, Tools and Techniques
  • Working with Restricted Collections: Technologies and User and Library Needs

About the HathiTrust Research Center and the HTRC UnCamp

The HTRC is a collaborative research center launched jointly by Indiana University and the University of Illinois, along with the HathiTrust Digital Library, to help meet the technical challenges of dealing with massive amounts of digital text that researchers face by developing cutting-edge software tools and cyberinfrastructure to enable advanced computational access to the growing digital record of human knowledge.

HTRC UnCamp 2018 is being organized with partners at Indiana University, University of California-Berkeley, University of Illinois, HathiTrust Digital Library, and the California Digital Library. The UnCamp will be hosted by the UC Berkeley Libraries in partnership with the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), the D-Lab, and the Academic Innovation Studio (AIS).

UPDATE: Elsevier Data Publishing Requirements

Last spring, we posted about data publishing requirements from Elsevier, Springer/Nature, and AAAS. At the time, Elsevier was the most lenient on their data publishing policies and used language that was suggestive and encouraging of data publishing. As of September 5th, 2017, that is no longer the case. Elsevier has signed on to the Transparency and Openness Guidelines (TOP) through the Center for Open Science. We talk and write a lot about transparency, openness, and sharing in science; however, there is a disconnect between the conversations and the daily workflows and practice of scientists. I was once told, after giving a workshop on data sharing, that I was an idealist trying to preach to realists. In order to close that gap, we need more publishers, like Elsevier, to make the ideal a reality, and enforce strict guidelines on data sharing and publishing.

Elsevier Logo

 

Let’s take a look at the 5 new data sharing requirements, which will be implemented for 1800 of Elsevier’s titles:

Option A:  you are encouraged to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article

Option B: you are encouraged to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • If you can’t do this, be prepared to explain why!

Option C: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • if you can’t do this, be prepared to explain why!

Option D: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article

Option E: you are required to

  • deposit your research data in a relevant repository
  • cite this dataset in your article
  • link this dataset in your article
  • peer reviewers will review the data prior to publication

The new Elsevier policy is similar in nature to Springer/Nature with their tiered system of requirements. It’s important to check with your individual journal to see which option it falls under. Ideally, you will always follow option E, where you make your data openly available, cited, linked, and provide the proper amount of metadata to go through the peer review process or be reused by another researcher.

 

If you have any questions about how to enrich the metadata of your dataset, or where to deposit your research data, please email researchdata@berkeley.edu!

 

 

Trial: Colonial America, with handwritten text recognition

Adam Matthew Digital (AMD) has completed three of five modules of Colonial America, an online resource that will include all 1,450 volumes of the CO 5 series from The National Archives, UK, covering the period 1606 to 1822. The Library currently has trial access to the three modules until October 16, 2017.

It is with the third module of Colonial America that AMD has implemented a technology that allows for full text searching of handwritten documents. The Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) application uses algorithms and artificial intelligence to determine possible combinations of characters in manuscripts.

The default search will search both metadata applied to documents and their text. When results are found in the text, they are displayed as snippets.

example of search results

 

 

 

 

 

Clicking on a hit will take you to the page where the word appears.

example of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This search function is ground-breaking, but not 100% accurate. I’ve searched for words that exist in a document and have retrieved no results. I have also searched for words that were written sloppily or with a long s and have retrieved results.

I am interested in your feedback on both the value of the database and your successes (or failures) with full-text searches. Email me at dorner@berkeley.edu.

(Please note that PDF downloads are not available during the trial.)

Maps & More: Hamilton!

Please mark your calendars for the first Maps and More pop-up exhibit of the semester!
Friday, September 22, 11 am – noon
Earth Sciences & Map Library, 50 McCone Hall
Hamilton, in Maps informational poster

You’ve listened to the musical, now put some names to places with maps related to Alexander Hamilton’s life and exploits. This month’s Maps and More collections show-and-tell event is offered in coordination with the On the Same Page program. Featuring maps and atlases from the Earth Sciences & Map Library collection, this exhibit helps put some geographic context to key events in Hamilton, from his birth in the West Indies to his years in Philadelphia and New York and his deadly duel on the banks of the Hudson.

 
We’re delighted to have history graduate student Nicole Viglini guest curating this pop-up exhibit. Nicole’s research interests include themes of race, culture, class, and gender in early and nineteenth-century America and the Caribbean.
 
We hope to see you there!
Susan Powell
Sam Teplitzky
 
ps: Save the date for next month’s Maps and More on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 11 am – noon with mapmaker Stace Wright of Eureka Cartography!

Digital Publishing Workshops for the Fall!

Digital Publishing Workshop Series

Whether you are looking to create a digital book, a companion website for a book, a scholarly portfolio, or a full-scale digital project, this workshop series is designed to get you up and running with the skills and tools you need for successful digital publications. No programming or coding knowledge is required. Technology workshops will be hands-on; bring a laptop if you can.

This semester you can try:

  • Web Platforms for Digital Projects
  • Designing in Drupal
  • WordPress for Easy and Attractive Websites
  • Share Your Scholarship: MLA’s Humanities Commons
  • HTML/CSS Toolkit for Digital Projects

Register at bit.ly/dp-berk

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Overleaf and ShareLaTeX – Joining Forces!

Overleaf and ShareLaTeX, online collaborative LaTeX editors, will soon be merging into one platform, utilizing their individual strengths. Both tools emerged on the market around the same time in 2012, seeing incredible growth and promise from users as longterm, useful tools. In January 2017, the UC-Berkeley Library subscribed to both tools in order to provide our researchers and students with pro account features of both tools. Both tools enable users to collaborate with groups and individuals on documents; simplify file directories; provide real-time previews; quickly identify errors; and provide access to excellent training tools and hundreds of templates from publishers and different types of documents, not just articles. If you regularly write documents in LaTeX, consider integrating one of these tools into your workflow. Both of them integrate with citation management software, git or GitHub, and provide revision history. Overleaf and ShareLaTeX contribute to a research workflow environment of transparency and preservation, both of which lend well to sharing and revisiting data and notation by others or your future self.
overleaf logo and ShareLaTeX logo
Individually, ShareLaTeX and Overleaf have focused on developing different strengths.
Overleaf:
  • WYSIWYG editor
  • publisher relationships for streamlined submission process
  • integration with Mendeley (which we also have an institutional subscription to!)
ShareLaTeX


The merger of the two platforms will focus on bringing together the strongest components of each tool. For now,  you can continue to create accounts on either platform and continue with your work. The founders of ShareLaTeX and Overleaf would like input from their users through this survey.


In the meantime, please join us at the Kresge Engineering Library to learn more about LaTeX and how to write in ShareLaTeX and Overleaf. We will be holding three workshops at the beginning of fall semester, in the Kresge Engineering Library Training Room:


August 24th, 4:00 – 5:00: Introduction to LaTeX
August 31st, 4:00 – 5:00: Typesetting in Math
September 7th, 4:00 – 5:00: Creating Tables, Figures, and Bibliographies


Please register through this form.


Please let us know if you have any questions about the Overleaf and ShareLaTeX merger, or the upcoming workshops.

New Books in Graduate Services July 2017

Let us now praise famous men : three tenant families

The Works of James Agee Volume 3: Let Us Know Praise Famous Men, An Annotated Edition with Supplementary Manuscripts by James Agee and Walker Evans edited by Hugh Davis

What is a people?

What Is A People? by Alain Badiou, Pierre Bourdieu, Judith Butler, George Didi-Huberman, Sadri Khiari, Jacques Raciere with an introduction by Bruno Bosteels and a conclusion by Kevin Olson

Collected stories

Collected Stories by John Barth

Creative evolution

Creative Evolution by Henri Bergson with an introduction by Keith Ansell Pearson

Brecht on theatre : the development of an aesthetic

Brecht On Theatre: The Development Of An Aesthetic by Bertolt Brecht edited and translated by John Willett

Notes toward a performative theory of assembly

Notes Towards A Performative Theory Of Assembly by Judith Butler

The early stories of Truman Capote

The Early Stories Of Truman Capote by Truman Capote with a forward by Hilton Als

An outcast of the islands

The Cambridge Edition Of The Works Of Joseph Conrad: An Outcast Of The Islands by Joseph Conrad edited by Allan H. Simmons

The selected letters of Joseph Conrad

The Selected Letters Of Joseph Conrad edited by Laurence Davies

Theory of the Lyric

Theory Of The Lyric by Jonathan Culler

I greet you at the beginning of a great career : the selected correspondence of Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg, 1955-1997

I Greet You At The Beginning Of A Great Career: The Selected Correspondence Of Lawrence Ferlinghetti And Alan Ginsberg, 1955-1997 edited by Bill Morgan

Translation, Rewriting, And The Manipulation Of Literary Fame by Andre Lefevere

Collected essays

Collected Essays by Arthur Miller

The Norton Shakespeare

The Norton Shakespeare (3rd Edition) by William Shakespeare edited by Stephen Greenblatt, Walter Cohen, Suzanne Gossett, Jean E. Howard, Katherine Eisaman Maus, Gordon McMullan

Theory of prose

Theory Of Prose by Viktor Shklovsky

Danger on peaks : poems

Danger On Peaks: Poems (Deluxe Audio Edition) by Gary Snyder

Technics and time / Vol. 1, The fault of Epimetheus, transl. [from the French] by Richard Beardsworth and George Collins.

Technics And Time, 1: The Fault Of Epimetheus by Bernard Stiegler

Technics and time. 2 : Disorientation

Technics And Time, 2: Disorientation by Bernard Stiegler

Genres in discourse

Genres In Discourse by Tzvetan Todorov

Poems, in two volumes, 1807

Poems, In Two Volumes by William Wordsworth edited by Richard Matlak

Library Carpentry Sprint at UC Berkeley

The UC Berkeley Library is participating in the worldwide Library Carpentry Sprint happening on June 1st and 2nd, which is a part of the larger Mozilla Global Sprint 2017. Library Carpentry is a part of the Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry family, and it strives to bring the fundamentals of computing, as well as a platform for further self-directed learning in digital scholarship to librarians and library staff. The goal of this Library Carpentry sprint is to improve Library Carpentry lessons, as well as get input from archivists about how we can make our lessons more archivist friendly. That said, you do not need to be a librarian to participate. If you are interested in pedagogy or are familiar with digital tools taught in Library Carpentry workshops, we seek your input in improving Library Carpentry lessons.

This sprint will take place in the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), and you can drop by anytime between 9am and 5pm on June 1st and 2nd to help amend, update, and extend the existing Library Carpentry lessons. You can stay as long as you want, whether it be two hours or two days.

Besides improving already existing Library Carpentry lessons, this sprint will also focus on getting draft lessons for SQL, Python, web scraping, and other topics into final shape for launch. Participants can contribute code or content; proofread writing, visual design, and graphic art; do QA (quality assurance) testing on prototype tools or apps; or advise or comment on project ideas or plans. All skill levels are welcome—and needed—as there are many ways to participate. Basically, we want you to bring your own unique perspective to the Library Carpentry lessons.

If you are interested in participating, all the details for the UC Berkeley Library Carpentry event can be found here, and you can sign up on the Library Carpentry Sprint Etherpad, which can be found here. Towards the of the Etherpad you will find the UC Berkeley location. Just add your name under that location, and show up during the sprint.

Hope to see you there!

 

Library of Congress releases 25 million metadata records

The Library of Congress recently released 25 million metadata records for free bulk download at loc.gov/cds/products/marcDist.php. These MARC records make up the foundation for library catalogs, such as OskiCat, which have enabled library users to find and access library books and other media for decades. As the LOC describes the collection:

 

The data covers a wide range of Library items including books, serials, computer files, manuscripts, maps, music and visual materials.  The free data sets cover more than 45 years, ranging from 1968, during the early years of MARC, to 2014.  Each record provides standardized information about an item, including the title, author, publication date, subject headings, genre, related names, summary and other notes.

Reading Room at the Library of Congress
Library of Congress Reading Room, from https://www.loc.gov

The data is available in UTF-8, MARC8, and XML formats, and has been conveniently divided by media type including books, computer files, maps, music, and more.

We’ve added the resource to the public section of the Computational Text Analysis and Text Mining Guide, where you can find many other sources for large-scale text analysis projects. For more information, take a look at the LOC’s Getting Started (PDF) for details on accessing the data.

Questions?

Stacy Reardon, Literatures and Digital Humanities Librarian, sreardon [at] berkeley.edu

Cody Hennesy, E-Learning and Information Studies Librarian, chennesy [at] berkeley.edu

California Visual Resources Association Conference, UC Berkeley, June 12 + 13

CaVraCon

 

Registration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley on June 12+13. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend CaVraCon 2017.

 

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).

 

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! Please also see the website for information on travel, accommodations, and the conference venue, Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley.

 

The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:
Digitization
Digital Preservation
Copyright
3D/VR
Emerging Technologies
Digital Humanities
Digital Art History
Digital Exhibits
Digital Assets Management
Image Metadata

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