Home » Arts & Humanities

Arts & Humanities

Summer Reading: Hag-Seed

Hag-Seed

Hag-Seed
Margaret Atwood
New York: Hogarth, 2016

A modern update to Shakespeare’s The Tempest, told from the perspective of a theater director who has been ousted from his post, and is plotting his revenge on his enemies while/through teaching Shakespeare-in-performance to prisoners, written by one of the best authors of our time. (And a good opportunity to revisit The Handmaid’s Tale.)

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

New Books in Literature

 

More new books
English and American Literature Research Guide

Summer Reading: Nonsense

Nonsense

Nonsense: The Power of Not Knowing
Jamie Holmes
New York: Crown Publishers, 2015

The very real perils and consequences of jumping to conclusions, of feeling total certainty and confidence, and the power of being able to handle ambiguity. (John Keats called this “Negative capability,” and he saw it most vividly in Shakespeare’s writing.) Told through a series of case studies ranging from the workplace to personal life. If our modern condition is one of unpredictability and increasing complexity, Holmes’ lessons for “how to deal with what we don’t understand” are particularly urgent.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

The hidden treasures in Italian Libraries

The ceiling in the reading room of the Biblioteca Vallicelliana in Rome.

The ceiling in the reading room of the Biblioteca Vallicelliana in Rome. Photo by Susan Wright for The New York Times

David Laskin’s article in yesterday’s New York Times gave a delectable overview of some of Italy’s historical libraries as not only keepers of intellectual treasures but as physical spaces to carry out research. While web portals such as Europeana or Internet Culturale are bringing us closer to Europe’s rare books and primary resources, conducting archival research in renaissance libraries such as the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in Venice, the Biblioteca Vallicelliana in Rome, or the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana designed by Michelangelo in Florence will never be completely replicated online.

UC Berkeley may not have paintings by Titian or Veronese decorating its reading rooms, but it is home to one of the most significant Italian collections on the West Coast with medieval manuscripts, incunabula, and early modern works in The Bancroft Library, and an extraordinary collection of 19th and 20th century Italian books and journal runs in the Main Stacks. The Library collects in all divisions of Italian history and literature, from the medieval and renaissance periods to the present. For the 20th and 21st centuries, the collection tends to focus more heavily on new literature(s), literary and cultural theory, cinema, historiography, Italian colonial presence in Africa, national and regional identity politics, and comparative studies with other Romance traditions. The Art History/Classics Library in Doe, the Hargrove Music Library, and the Environmental Design Library are all places on campus where the Italian collection continues to thrive.

Biblioteca Marciana

Biblioteca Marciana in Venice. Photo by Claude Potts

New Books in Art History

You can find these titles and other recent acquisitions on the Art History and Classics Library’s New Book Shelf.

 

 

 

Naieve

Naïeve schilders zien ons land

 

 

Summer Reading: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
Matthew Desmond
New York: Crown Publishers, 2016

The day-to-day experiences of landlords, tenants, movers, sheriffs, and others wrapped up in the economy of eviction. A great companion to last year’s On the Same Page pick, Just Mercy; at one point, Desmond writes, “If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods, eviction was shaping the lives of women. Poor black men were locked up. Poor black women were locked out.” Desmond makes the compelling case that stable housing is a precondition for civic engagement and democracy, because civic life begins at home, and is rooted in a community. After telling the unforgettable stories of a few to illustrate the plight of millions of Americans, he devotes the epilogue to making broader policy recommendations that aim to break the cycle of eviction.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

New Books In Graduate Services June 2017

Abstracts and brief chronicles of the time. I, Los, a chapter

Abstracts And Brief Chronicles Of The Time v.1: Los, A Chapter by Helene Cixous

Ego sum corpus, anima, fabula

Ego Sum: Corpus, Anima, Fabula by Jean-Luc Nancy

New Books in Art History

You can find these titles and other recent acquisitions on the Art History and Classics Library’s New Book Shelf.

 

 

 

 

Summer Reading List: Ready Player One

Ready Player One

Ready Player One
Ernest Cline
New York: Crown Publishers, 2011

The fantastic novel Ready Player One presents a world in which virtual reality technology becomes fully integrated with and inseparable from humankind’s lives. With the advancement of technology in our own world, there is a growing amount of hype and optimism around the diverse applicability of virtual reality but also a lack of thorough study of its implications. In about a generation’s time, virtual-reality technology should mature and if it indeed stays true to its current hype, it is our generation’s responsibility to conceive of some of its potential implications to better prepare ourselves for what’s about to dawn on us. Ready Player One serves as a cautionary tale as it explores those implications through the characters’ relationships, their sense of identity, and the greed for power.

This book is part of the 2017 Berkeley Summer Reading List. Stay tuned for more weekly posts!

Library Carpentry Sprint at UC Berkeley

The UC Berkeley Library is participating in the worldwide Library Carpentry Sprint happening on June 1st and 2nd, which is a part of the larger Mozilla Global Sprint 2017. Library Carpentry is a part of the Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry family, and it strives to bring the fundamentals of computing, as well as a platform for further self-directed learning in digital scholarship to librarians and library staff. The goal of this Library Carpentry sprint is to improve Library Carpentry lessons, as well as get input from archivists about how we can make our lessons more archivist friendly. That said, you do not need to be a librarian to participate. If you are interested in pedagogy or are familiar with digital tools taught in Library Carpentry workshops, we seek your input in improving Library Carpentry lessons.

This sprint will take place in the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), and you can drop by anytime between 9am and 5pm on June 1st and 2nd to help amend, update, and extend the existing Library Carpentry lessons. You can stay as long as you want, whether it be two hours or two days.

Besides improving already existing Library Carpentry lessons, this sprint will also focus on getting draft lessons for SQL, Python, web scraping, and other topics into final shape for launch. Participants can contribute code or content; proofread writing, visual design, and graphic art; do QA (quality assurance) testing on prototype tools or apps; or advise or comment on project ideas or plans. All skill levels are welcome—and needed—as there are many ways to participate. Basically, we want you to bring your own unique perspective to the Library Carpentry lessons.

If you are interested in participating, all the details for the UC Berkeley Library Carpentry event can be found here, and you can sign up on the Library Carpentry Sprint Etherpad, which can be found here. Towards the of the Etherpad you will find the UC Berkeley location. Just add your name under that location, and show up during the sprint.

Hope to see you there!

 

Show Your Support

Show Your Support button to donate to the Library

Library Events Calendar

Subscribe to Email