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Addressing fake news in the classroom

Newspaper spiral
Photo by Silke Remmery CC via Flickr

As an instructor, are you concerned that your students have a ‘dismaying’ inability to tell fake news from real? If so, you are invited to join a UC Berkeley faculty conversation on March 1st about how to help students navigate the rapidly changing online information landscape, and the proliferation of fake news and “alternative facts.” Faculty from Media Studies, College Writing, Integrative Biology, Political Economy and Journalism will lead this conversation on media literacy and the evaluation of sources for the classroom.

Beyond Hype, Hysteria, and Headlines: Addressing Media Literacy Gaps in the Classroom

  • March 1, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in the Academic Innovation Studio (117 Dwinelle)
  • Panel: Beverly Crawford (Political Science/Economy), Leslea Hlusko (Integrative Biology), Mike Larkin (College Writing), Jean Retzinger (Media Studies), and Edward Wasserman (Journalism). Moderated by Cody Hennesy (Doe Library).

You may also be interested in sharing the new library guide to Fake News, which can help students understand and detect fake news. Subject librarians are also available to help design research assignments, to visit the classroom and discuss the evaluation of resources, and you can always request a library workshop for your class.

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